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  • Build a Microwave Transformer Homemade Stick/Arc Welder

    good thinking...oil is used as a coolant...but it might be harder to get then water and also the fact that oil has higher viscosity (oil is more has more stickiness than say, 'water', it doesn't transport the heat away as well as something that is 'less viscous' (like water)...so it will end up cooling it...but won't dump the heat as easily as something that is thin like water...still you could use it if you had it....(more is better (MOST OF THE TIME)....overdesigned things NEVER BREAK....anyone who tells you different is a moron;) good luck man.

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  • Build a Microwave Transformer Homemade Stick/Arc Welder

    Ahsan...sorry that you ran into so much trouble...I wish they were as wasteful over there as they are here (I have 8 transformers that I pulled from microwaves thrown to the garbage....free.....hahasad but true.Anyhow you have to limit the current...a 5 pound transformer can only handle about 5 amps for a minute or so before the wire insulating the loops in the coil melts and shorts out... the problem is also that as it gets hotter it becomes easier for the insulation to melt (in the coils of the transformer especially....), so you need more experience then this to make a properly grounded setup before you do this, (and it isn't even safe WITH such a setup....but one way that I have sloppily thrown together a cooler is by putting the transformer inside acontainer and then putting that c...see more »Ahsan...sorry that you ran into so much trouble...I wish they were as wasteful over there as they are here (I have 8 transformers that I pulled from microwaves thrown to the garbage....free.....hahasad but true.Anyhow you have to limit the current...a 5 pound transformer can only handle about 5 amps for a minute or so before the wire insulating the loops in the coil melts and shorts out... the problem is also that as it gets hotter it becomes easier for the insulation to melt (in the coils of the transformer especially....), so you need more experience then this to make a properly grounded setup before you do this, (and it isn't even safe WITH such a setup....but one way that I have sloppily thrown together a cooler is by putting the transformer inside acontainer and then putting that container into something shallow like a cookie pan or maybe just put mesh in the bottom of a bigger container to allow water to contact the bottom of the container that the transformer is in (metal is good for conduction of heat...but it makes it more dangerous)....then the outside of the transformer will not get much hotter than 100 Celsius (that is the boiling point of water.....assuming you keep it with water in it contacting the whole bottom surface....that will help the overall heat to disipate faster...but at a cost of safety more or less....sorry I cant be of more help....not too much time these days.

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  • Build a Microwave Transformer Homemade Stick/Arc Welder

    Where N is the number of turns on transformer “x” or “y”respectively, you can create two equations and two unknowns and solve for thenumber of turns that you made and then check to see if the voltages 120V X Nx…outof transformer X is what it theoretically should be (or close to it)…if not,then think about why…25/Nx (240)+20/Ny (240)=17.68 volts andNx(120) + Ny(120) =240 volt6000/(Nx)+ 4800/(Ny) = 17.68 volt120(Nx) + 120(Ny) = 240 VoltDivide the 2 equations gives -à((120(Nx)^2)/6000) + ((120(Ny)^2)/4800) = (240 Volt/17.68 Volt)(3(Nx)^2/150) + (3(Ny)^2/120) = 13.575Volt/Volt….-->Then solve for nx or ny and plug it back into one or theother equation to get the other then check the voltage in each transformer tomake sure that it ...see more »Where N is the number of turns on transformer “x” or “y”respectively, you can create two equations and two unknowns and solve for thenumber of turns that you made and then check to see if the voltages 120V X Nx…outof transformer X is what it theoretically should be (or close to it)…if not,then think about why…25/Nx (240)+20/Ny (240)=17.68 volts andNx(120) + Ny(120) =240 volt6000/(Nx)+ 4800/(Ny) = 17.68 volt120(Nx) + 120(Ny) = 240 VoltDivide the 2 equations gives -à((120(Nx)^2)/6000) + ((120(Ny)^2)/4800) = (240 Volt/17.68 Volt)(3(Nx)^2/150) + (3(Ny)^2/120) = 13.575Volt/Volt….-->Then solve for nx or ny and plug it back into one or theother equation to get the other then check the voltage in each transformer tomake sure that it is somewhat close to the values you got (it wont be exactbecause of impedance and nothing is theoretically perfect (resistence andlosses will make sure of that…., but it should be near the values….

    In general, if you add the two sources in series then you add the voltage....BUT...also you have to take into account that IF the transformers are different sizes and or different number of turns, or different size wiring, then the impedances of the individuals dont add together like 1volt + 1 volt = 2 volts...but rather 1 + 1 = 1.3 volts (a made up example).Can you do anything about it....well if you want more voltage, more turns of wire and perhaps smaller wire if needed...or....if you want and can get another transformer of the same size and make them identical in design, then the theoretical voltage should add up like the 1 volt + 1 volt = 2 Volt example above.....so another words, to simplify things you should have the same transformers because the impedance will be the same in eac...see more »In general, if you add the two sources in series then you add the voltage....BUT...also you have to take into account that IF the transformers are different sizes and or different number of turns, or different size wiring, then the impedances of the individuals dont add together like 1volt + 1 volt = 2 volts...but rather 1 + 1 = 1.3 volts (a made up example).Can you do anything about it....well if you want more voltage, more turns of wire and perhaps smaller wire if needed...or....if you want and can get another transformer of the same size and make them identical in design, then the theoretical voltage should add up like the 1 volt + 1 volt = 2 Volt example above.....so another words, to simplify things you should have the same transformers because the impedance will be the same in each respectively.I am not an electrical engineer (I am a mechanical engineer), but I think that is the information you need. Hope it helps.

    It depends on the breakers for the circuits...I assume that with a 240 volt mains, it would be be connected to a 50 amp breaker.....so that means that the mains will dump 240 Volts at 50 amps...ie 240*50 Volt Amps....or 1200 Volt amps...ie 1.2KVa....if the breaker was a 30 amp breaker off your mains then it would be 240 Volts times 30 Amps to equal 720Volt Amps or 0.72KVa.....That means that with the same voltage ...bigger breaker is better....so 50 amp would be better than 30 amp....now comes the safety part...In order for the TRANSFORMERS to handle MORE AMPS they have to be bigger (the weight of the metal has to be bigger ....that way it doesn't over heat (the metal in the transformer can distribute the heat better if it is more massive...more surface area to get rid of the heat faste...see more »It depends on the breakers for the circuits...I assume that with a 240 volt mains, it would be be connected to a 50 amp breaker.....so that means that the mains will dump 240 Volts at 50 amps...ie 240*50 Volt Amps....or 1200 Volt amps...ie 1.2KVa....if the breaker was a 30 amp breaker off your mains then it would be 240 Volts times 30 Amps to equal 720Volt Amps or 0.72KVa.....That means that with the same voltage ...bigger breaker is better....so 50 amp would be better than 30 amp....now comes the safety part...In order for the TRANSFORMERS to handle MORE AMPS they have to be bigger (the weight of the metal has to be bigger ....that way it doesn't over heat (the metal in the transformer can distribute the heat better if it is more massive...more surface area to get rid of the heat faster and more volume to take up the created electric flux field....Also the wires need to be bigger to handle more amps....there are rules of thumb, but if you get 10 gauge wire...and just make sure that it doesnt get much hotter than will burn you, then you should be okay...you just make sure to turn it off before it gets that hot....(also remember that just because the surface is not hot enough to burn you doesnt mean that the wires in the inside of the transformer (the ones you cant touch) are not getting hot enough to burn you. The heat burns through the insulation creating a short so dont destroy your transformer by letting it get to hot...there is much more too it, but hopefully that helps....more transformers are better than less....and also if your stick wont start an arc, then it is likely too low of a voltage (so add another transformer in series....and if the welder sounds more like it is cooking bacon in grease, then that means that your amperage is too low for what you are welding...so increase it...(one way to increase it would be by using less wraps of thicker wire...good luck man.

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  • JaredD23 commented on johnl375's instructable DIY: How to make a Low Cost 3D Scanner3 months ago
    DIY: How to make a Low Cost 3D Scanner

    Very great...thanks for putting forth the effort to share your hard work and thinking....working together creates a world in which we all can do much more together than individually!

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  • Easy $0 Wire-wrapping Tool for Electrics. Drill compatible

    all you have to do to correct the whole breaking is use a different method to make a loop for the wire to be held in...(for instance, make a loop that sits at the end like the eye of the needle that is attached somehow to the rest of the tube)...then us that loop instead of cutting the ink tube).

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