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  • JoeV24 commented on Jobar007's instructable 51 Cent-ish Fishing Lure1 month ago
    51 Cent-ish Fishing Lure

    Yeah - I collect 2x4s and 2x6s from construction sites and build them into bass guitars. I don't want to scoop your post, so I won't upload a pix here. Maybe I can get some pennies flattened by the train that goes through town tomorrow. The train is very slow and I bet the pennies will come out nice and flat.

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  • JoeV24 commented on Jobar007's instructable 51 Cent-ish Fishing Lure1 month ago
    51 Cent-ish Fishing Lure

    Uhh. Err. Balsa is technically a hardwood. It's an angiosperm.

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  • JoeV24 commented on stannickel's instructable Table for a Cheap Tablesaw4 months ago
    Table for a Cheap Tablesaw

    I make sure that all my cabinets and worktops --- including saw tables and drill press tables, routers, joiners, etc, have the same height of 34 inches from the floor. That way all your table/desk/tool tops are the same and it makes it very easy to have a long board spill over to another surface that's the same height. I sometimes retract the table saw blade and use the rolling table I built at a portable workbench.Since the project of choice for me is building guitars, then I use a Bosch direct-drive table saw much the same as yours and it suffices me well too. If I have something bigger to rip, I set up my aluminum channel fence and use my Skill-Saw worm drive that can make a nice cut too. I got rid of a ShopSmith as it was too large for me and I really like a tool to be single-purpos...see more »I make sure that all my cabinets and worktops --- including saw tables and drill press tables, routers, joiners, etc, have the same height of 34 inches from the floor. That way all your table/desk/tool tops are the same and it makes it very easy to have a long board spill over to another surface that's the same height. I sometimes retract the table saw blade and use the rolling table I built at a portable workbench.Since the project of choice for me is building guitars, then I use a Bosch direct-drive table saw much the same as yours and it suffices me well too. If I have something bigger to rip, I set up my aluminum channel fence and use my Skill-Saw worm drive that can make a nice cut too. I got rid of a ShopSmith as it was too large for me and I really like a tool to be single-purpose anyway.Once in a while I will put my portable table router on top of the table saw and use the extra height to make some precision cuts closer to eye level. And all my power tools - with a few exceptions - run on 220 VAC.

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  • JoeV24 commented on Mr-Mash's instructable Car Wheel Bicycle - the Learn to Weld Project4 months ago
    Car Wheel Bicycle - the Learn to Weld Project

    Just for more Steam Punk design, how about a second three speed hub in the rear wheel? That'd give you 9 forward gears and ONE of them should be to your liking!

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  • JoeV24 commented on FlorianBecker's instructable The ultimate wifi network4 months ago
    The ultimate wifi network

    I agree totally since I can Google almost anything including a do it yourself trepanation. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&u...

    I don't personally feel this is very 'tech-y' at all. Most of it, once the products were named is pretty much PNP. The only oddball part was the ip/pg system that sends via hardwire power lines in the house. (Hmmmm. I wonder, since Montana is on the same grid, if this could be used to allow interstate IPG comunication... AS WAS PROMISED for the whole world a few years ago? Huh?) I digress. Sorry.FWIW: I have a steel roof over my 24x65 mobile home here, a on-top-of-the-refrigerator, very antique Netgear before-rubber-ducky-antenna system and get almost no signal loss even in my tin workshop, 60 feet away from it. I even get 1/4 mile down the road to my neighbor and coverage in my horse pastures and my tractor barn, although truth be told, the tractor barn metal doors have to be open for ...see more »I don't personally feel this is very 'tech-y' at all. Most of it, once the products were named is pretty much PNP. The only oddball part was the ip/pg system that sends via hardwire power lines in the house. (Hmmmm. I wonder, since Montana is on the same grid, if this could be used to allow interstate IPG comunication... AS WAS PROMISED for the whole world a few years ago? Huh?) I digress. Sorry.FWIW: I have a steel roof over my 24x65 mobile home here, a on-top-of-the-refrigerator, very antique Netgear before-rubber-ducky-antenna system and get almost no signal loss even in my tin workshop, 60 feet away from it. I even get 1/4 mile down the road to my neighbor and coverage in my horse pastures and my tractor barn, although truth be told, the tractor barn metal doors have to be open for it to work well in there, but the horses don't complain.....yet. It must be the clear blue Montana sky here or some phenomenon under the steel roof that gets me this crazy range, but it sure works for me. I begin to believe that there are no valid rules on signal propagation - just voodoo science that sounds high-tech.

    You're welcome for nothing.

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  • JoeV24 commented on yourmechanic's instructable How to Test Your Car's Alternator4 months ago
    How to Test Your Car's Alternator

    One more step. Turn OFF all accessories, and with the engine running - turn your DVOM to the AC setting and read the value. Be sure to run this test as close to the anternator output lug as posible since the nearer you test to the battery, the "softer" the signal might be and create a false negative. The battery acts as a huge "sink" or shock absorber for voltage spikes, but it won't protect devices forever that need good electricity. The output voltage on the AC scale must not exceed 0.002VAC or there is likely a diode problem. Modern auto computers - and newer vehicles may have more than three units - thrive on purity and quality of your alternator's output. Sine waves or spikes in the digital signal can cause a lot of havoc with on board ECMs, ECUs, BCMs, TCMS a...see more »One more step. Turn OFF all accessories, and with the engine running - turn your DVOM to the AC setting and read the value. Be sure to run this test as close to the anternator output lug as posible since the nearer you test to the battery, the "softer" the signal might be and create a false negative. The battery acts as a huge "sink" or shock absorber for voltage spikes, but it won't protect devices forever that need good electricity. The output voltage on the AC scale must not exceed 0.002VAC or there is likely a diode problem. Modern auto computers - and newer vehicles may have more than three units - thrive on purity and quality of your alternator's output. Sine waves or spikes in the digital signal can cause a lot of havoc with on board ECMs, ECUs, BCMs, TCMS and such that can damage the computer or the system it controls. WARNING Analog meters should be used with serious caution for underhood testing as they may inadvertently get into a 5VDC signal or supply path and can load down the fragile system too much. You can damage sensitive electronics with analog meters and worse yet - test lights.

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