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  • KDS4444 commented on The Rambler's instructable How To: Make a Leather Wallet3 days ago
    How To: Make a Leather Wallet

    Am curious: I don't see any description of the weight of the leather you used, and you don't seem to say what the dimensions are of the piece you cut. Do you know how thick the leather was? What the dimensions of it were? Thanks!

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  • Replacing the Screen on a Samsung NP300E5A-A01UB Laptop Computer

    Link away! Am glad you enjoyed.

    I am so glad it has found some use! Your response is very gratifying for me, and I just wish everyone who felt like that after following this Instructable would also take a quick moment to let me know. Just 'cause.

    This instructable only covers replacing the screen, it doesn't address faulty battery release mechanisms, about which I know nothing. Sorry.

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  • KDS4444 commented on aishair's instructable How to Install a Bidet4 months ago
    How to Install a Bidet

    What does this look like inside the toilet? Does it work well? Could you show us?

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  • KDS4444 commented on Luscious Luke's instructable Home Made Bidet4 months ago
    Home Made Bidet

    Classic: an Instructable with one step: "Here— do what I did." Not helpful.

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  • Simple Power LED Linear Current Regulator, Revised & Clarified

    I don't disagree with anyone who says that Dan's version is (mostly) correct (though as I have pointed out, he had at least one technical specification error with regard to the 100 K-ohm resistor, which I have corrected). My concern was with regard to the number of LEDs I ended up losing by following his instructions to the letter (i.e., not with an incorrect R1, but to the letter as Dan had intended it)— while I must admit that I did not specifically test the voltage being delivered at each point in my circuit, having gotten a damaging result SIX TIMES and then ONLY when there was a large difference between the voltage supplied by my power supply and that indicated as the limit of my LEDs brought me to the conclusion (possibly erroneous, I know) that this circuit was a potential...

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    I don't disagree with anyone who says that Dan's version is (mostly) correct (though as I have pointed out, he had at least one technical specification error with regard to the 100 K-ohm resistor, which I have corrected). My concern was with regard to the number of LEDs I ended up losing by following his instructions to the letter (i.e., not with an incorrect R1, but to the letter as Dan had intended it)— while I must admit that I did not specifically test the voltage being delivered at each point in my circuit, having gotten a damaging result SIX TIMES and then ONLY when there was a large difference between the voltage supplied by my power supply and that indicated as the limit of my LEDs brought me to the conclusion (possibly erroneous, I know) that this circuit was a potential LED death trap and that people needed to be warned about this. Also, although I mentioned here the six blue LEDs I lost by following Dan's Instructible, the fact is that I also lost half a dozen brand new and somewhat pricey white LEDs the same way, using a completely different MOSFET, transistor, and resistors (with the same ratings). I could find no other way of accounting for this other than an unknown design limitation of the original circuit. I shot a lot of cash on those LEDs and my deep frustration over this is a large part of what motivated me to create this revision of Dan's Instructible. My own attempts to contact him went unanswered (no idea why).Lastly, while I understand the usefulness of an electrical diagram and would never have attempted to build this circuit without one, I felt very strongly that having a less-technical and more-visually intuitive set of illustrations might also help electrical newbies create this circuit successfully. Again, this is not to say that what Dan posted was wrong, only that it was weak on a number of important details ("small", "large", etc.) and that it would have benefited from some images that were less schematic (not INSTEAD of the schematic diagrams! In ADDITION to them!). I did my best to give credit where it was due, as well as to point out some of the [in my opinion and experience] rather severe gaps Dan left. I would have been much happier to have had him respond to my questions on his Instructible! But I got nuthin'. And so here we have this.I would very much like to know if anyone else has attempted to create this circuit and had a similar LED-destruction problem like I did. I have a very hard time believing that the LEDs I lost while following Dan's version of this Instructible were ALL destroyed because of some mistake or another on my end. I made the circuit too many times to believe that. But unless someone else comes along and says, "Hey, I built this circuit and *I* had no problem even when there was a large difference between my power supply's voltage and that required by my power LEDs!" I am left standing by my claim that this circuit has limitations that Dan did not adequately examine or explain. I wish to God he had, but he didn't, and as near as I can tell he never will. If ANYone can either specifically refute my own findings or confirm them (either way!) I would be immeasurably grateful... Simply telling me that the circuit looks like it should work fine without having used it on some power LEDS to see what happens is not helpful, not to me nor to anyone else who might read this Instructible in the future.I have ranted. I am sorry. I will stop there.

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  • KDS4444 commented on SunderOrigami's instructable How to make a Gift Wrapping Bow!9 months ago
    How to make a Gift Wrapping Bow!

    Um, I don't see any video....

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  • Make a Japanese Garden Lantern out of Hypertufa

    Got your message, and yes, it absolutely makes a difference (and I should have made this clearer in the course of the Instructable). If your cement mix freezes, it will have a very difficult time curing and very well might crumble when it thaws (though I have never tested this). Also, lower temps mean longer cure times. Generally, there will never be any harm in letting a hypertufa object cure for LONGER than the recommended time, but there is always a risk of it coming apart if you only keep it moist and warm for a SHORTER time than recommended. Also, heating up your project will make it cure faster (if you had an oven you could put it in, and could keep in moist despite the heat, that would be ideal!). I live in LA, so I don't usually worry about such things, but yes, outdoor tem...

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    Got your message, and yes, it absolutely makes a difference (and I should have made this clearer in the course of the Instructable). If your cement mix freezes, it will have a very difficult time curing and very well might crumble when it thaws (though I have never tested this). Also, lower temps mean longer cure times. Generally, there will never be any harm in letting a hypertufa object cure for LONGER than the recommended time, but there is always a risk of it coming apart if you only keep it moist and warm for a SHORTER time than recommended. Also, heating up your project will make it cure faster (if you had an oven you could put it in, and could keep in moist despite the heat, that would be ideal!). I live in LA, so I don't usually worry about such things, but yes, outdoor temperatures will certainly make a difference at least as far as freezing goes. Once you are above freezing, hypertufa should cure fine, just needing more time (days) at the lowest temperatures.

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  • Simple Power LED Linear Current Regulator, Revised & Clarified

    Have now replaced this with a correctly marked image. Thanks for pointing it out to me.

    You are correct— I did not invert my results (1/1 ohm + ½ ohms=1/1.5=0.666 ohms of resistance)

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  • Charge Your Car Battery With Laptop Charger!

    I understand that the multimeter here is measuring the current flowing into the car battery, but can you explain what purpose this information serves? Simply knowing what the current is may not by itself have any bearing... Unless it does somehow. And if so, can you explain it? In other words, if I do NOT use a multimeter to measure the current btw the laptop adapter and the car battery, what will I be missing? (esp. given that I know the adapter can't put out more current than the battery can hold, just more voltage, which I am already measuring through the volt meter attached to the car battery in your design). Thanks!

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  • KDS4444 commented on Grathio's instructable Choosing The Resistor To Use With LEDs1 year ago
    Choosing The Resistor To Use With LEDs

    ...and hook them up in parallel, not in series...

    Also consider this: the little bouncer may actually get run over if the current is too fast-- i.e., you may destroy your resistor if it either isn't rated to withstand that kind of fast current OR if it doesn't provide enough outright resistance to the flow of the current. A resistor of 100,000 ohms rated for a certain wattage will be okay in a place where a resistor with the same wattage rating but only 5 ohms of resistance will get burned up by the same amount of current. A small bouncer who is able to say "no" to most everyone will be able to handle the situation without burning up, as will a "big" bouncer who says "yes" to lots of people. A fast current through a small (low wattage) resistor with a low level of resistance is what makes the resistor g...

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    Also consider this: the little bouncer may actually get run over if the current is too fast-- i.e., you may destroy your resistor if it either isn't rated to withstand that kind of fast current OR if it doesn't provide enough outright resistance to the flow of the current. A resistor of 100,000 ohms rated for a certain wattage will be okay in a place where a resistor with the same wattage rating but only 5 ohms of resistance will get burned up by the same amount of current. A small bouncer who is able to say "no" to most everyone will be able to handle the situation without burning up, as will a "big" bouncer who says "yes" to lots of people. A fast current through a small (low wattage) resistor with a low level of resistance is what makes the resistor get hot/ incinerate!

    I am sorry I didn't notice this reply two years ago. Let me see if I can get this right: what happens when you attach such LEDs to a 5V 700mAh power supply is that the LEDs will attempt to draw all the power they can from the power supply-- that supply is only RATED at 700 mAh, and so the POWER SUPPLY will start to overheat! (to say nothing of the LEDs, which will also likely go kaput). The mAh rating of any power supply is the amount of power (current) that it can safely PROVIDE without damaging ITSELF, it is NOT a measure of how much "power" or "current" it "provides" (per se). If your circuit only draws 20mAh from a 700mAh power supply, that's great! If your circuit tries to draw 1000mAh from the same power supply, the supply will be damaged, not the...

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    I am sorry I didn't notice this reply two years ago. Let me see if I can get this right: what happens when you attach such LEDs to a 5V 700mAh power supply is that the LEDs will attempt to draw all the power they can from the power supply-- that supply is only RATED at 700 mAh, and so the POWER SUPPLY will start to overheat! (to say nothing of the LEDs, which will also likely go kaput). The mAh rating of any power supply is the amount of power (current) that it can safely PROVIDE without damaging ITSELF, it is NOT a measure of how much "power" or "current" it "provides" (per se). If your circuit only draws 20mAh from a 700mAh power supply, that's great! If your circuit tries to draw 1000mAh from the same power supply, the supply will be damaged, not the circuit. Power LEDs don't limit their own current draw-- this must be managed by some kind of external circuit. Obviously, hooking a power LED up to a power supply that has a very high mAh rating will quickly destroy the LED, even if the voltage provided by that supply is within specs (unlike a regular LED, which will be fine no matter what the current supplied is-- so long as that current draw is lower than the rating of the power supply, the power supply will not be damaged either).

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  • KDS4444 commented on Dustint66's instructable Black and white headshots made simple1 year ago
    Black and white headshots made simple

    What would be great is if you could post an overhead diagram showing where your lights, camera, and stool are placed for each of these shots. It would also be handy if you described exactly what a "soft box" is for those who see your video and are not professional photographers. Thanks! I intend to use what I've learned in this video to take some headshots today.

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