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  • Kevanf1 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw3 weeks ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    Yes it will :) In this case it would be rather difficult as the steel must be really clean but you certainly can solder steel to steel or to brass/copper etc. I used to do it for a living on small pumping units.

    Owned one for over 30 years but sometimes they can be a bit unwieldy (arthritis in my hands) so I opt for the lighter hammer through screwdriver. It does the same job :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw1 month ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    Two things I use. I have a set of 'hammer through' screwdrivers. The shaft has a cap that enables the screwdriver to be hammered without damaging it and one of these usually gets me out of trouble. Alternatively, if I am trying to remove a seized nut, bolt or screw out of metal then I pop a small nut over the top of the screw head. Then I run a quick bean of weld inside that nut. Let it cool then get a spanner or socket on the nut and the underlying screw etc should unscrew very easily.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on thediylife's instructable DIY Cordless Cold Heat Soldering Iron1 month ago
    DIY Cordless Cold Heat Soldering Iron

    It's an amazing idea but I have to echo the thoughts of of others and say that I think you are in for a world of hurt with this. I can only see cold joint after cold joint and a lot of frustration because of it :( Ok, in an emergency which is the intention it's a case of what do you have to lose? This is why I carry a USB soldering iron and a power bank with me. Very low wattage but it does the job lovely and the iron is ultra cheap.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on kess_gr's instructable DIY Sheet Metal Bender Brake 2 months ago
    DIY Sheet Metal Bender Brake

    Ah, but I am plainly not 'any engineer' :D I'm afraid I have not looked at or even seen a press brake close up. So I thought this was fine as it was. I'll take a look at the You Tube video to see the modifications. I'll still be building one later this year :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on kess_gr's instructable DIY Sheet Metal Bender Brake 2 months ago
    DIY Sheet Metal Bender Brake

    Really? Having gone through the Instructable there certainly is provision for different thicknesses of material and they can be clamped down. I like this version of a bending brake and will hopefully make it myself later this year. Thank you to 'kess_gr'.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on SpecificLove's instructable Survival Whistle from a Soup Can2 months ago
    Survival Whistle from a Soup Can

    Some of us have been trying and trying to whistle with the fingers in the mouth technique for a long time. In my case 50 years. I've had plenty of people who have shown me how to do it. Sadly I simply can't :( So this is a very good Instructable for those of who are unable to whistle very loudly. I can whistle a tune just not loud. I do actually carry a policeman's style whistle with me most of the time as I am disabled and fall a great deal but this is a great back up plan, thank you.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on danthemakerman's instructable Marking Knife from Saw Blade3 months ago
    Marking Knife from Saw Blade

    I recently watched an episode of 'Forged in Fire' where a contestant used an old mower blade to create a knife. They said it was 'high carbon' steel at the the time. So are there low and high carbon steel type mower blades being used? His knife was very tough and kept an excellent edge even through the various tests it was was put through.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on MicahS23's instructable Wood Beam Fireplace Mantel3 months ago
    Wood Beam Fireplace Mantel

    i did a similar mantle piece about 30 years ago and it's still in place going strong :) I just happened to have a piece of floor joist left over from some work that was done on our house. I cut it to length and then I built a big bonfire. I placed the joist on the outside of the lit bonfire and let it char turning it evenly on all sides. Once it was blackened I removed it and let it cool. I then got to work with a sharp axe and took a few notches out along its length. Next step I got some 60 grade oxide paper/sandpaper (it's that long ago I'm not sure what the abrasive paper actually was that I used other than it being 60 grit). I smoothed the notches over and gently went over the burned parts to give a varying shade effect. I found this far easier and much more pleasing than tr...see more »i did a similar mantle piece about 30 years ago and it's still in place going strong :) I just happened to have a piece of floor joist left over from some work that was done on our house. I cut it to length and then I built a big bonfire. I placed the joist on the outside of the lit bonfire and let it char turning it evenly on all sides. Once it was blackened I removed it and let it cool. I then got to work with a sharp axe and took a few notches out along its length. Next step I got some 60 grade oxide paper/sandpaper (it's that long ago I'm not sure what the abrasive paper actually was that I used other than it being 60 grit). I smoothed the notches over and gently went over the burned parts to give a varying shade effect. I found this far easier and much more pleasing than trying to stain it. After this it was washed down with white spirit to remove any grease and dust then left to dry after which I applied about 3 or 4 coats of exterior quality polyurethane varnish. That finish has lasted all these years and looks very good, to me at least :)

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  • Get rid of steering wheel shake when braking.

    It's standard practise here i the UK to do a complete brake fluid change every 2 years. That is if the vehicle is serviced properly. The exception to this would be if silicon brake fluid is used. Silicon is not hygroscopic so therefore does not absorb moisture from the atmosphere. It may not be a lot but a small amount of water does get absorbed over time into standard old fashioned(?) brake fluid. Most vehicle manufacturers deem 2 years to be the time when the fluid needs changing before the percentage of moisture (water) is at such a level to be dangerous. It boils from the heat caused by braking thus turning to steam in the lines and of course lessening the braking effect.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on smurray2's instructable Making plastic with glue4 months ago
    Making plastic with glue

    Not all plastics are actually waterproof. Initially they may seem to be but some do absorb water over time. Nylon is the most famous one I can think of off the top of my head. Crazy really because (standard) fishing line is made of nylon monofilament...

    Hmm, very interesting. I see this being useful to make cheap worm like lures for fishing purposes. The one thing I wonder about is air bubble inclusion in the mix? Does air get trapped or does it dissipate as it sets? If it doesn't I suppose placing it on top of a washing machine on a spin cycle might agitate the trapped air and cause it to rise?Wonderful instructable, well done :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on lonesoulsurfer's instructable Simple Fire Piston5 months ago
    Simple Fire Piston

    2 imperial pints as in a quart(er) of a gallon :) I'm not sure if the US pint is slightly different to a UK pint but the ratio is the same :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on Xexos's instructable Water Casting Copper5 months ago
    Water Casting Copper

    I love your idea for a crucible well done :) I'm going to take this idea and use it for when I melt lead for making fishing weights. Thank you and well done on a brilliant Instructable.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on pjkumpon's instructable Make a Back Yard Pergola6 months ago
    Make a Back Yard Pergola

    Fantastic, well done and thank you. There is another way of holding the main supporting posts in place. Over here in the UK we can purchase a long spiked post holder that is driven into the ground. It has to be driven in perfectly level but that is actually quite easy. It does mean that the whole concrete slab process can be omitted saving a lot of time.

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  • Make Your Own Organic Plant Fertilizer for FREE

    Great 'bible' well done :) I've personally been using coffee grounds and banana skins as plant food for decades. Both are an excellent slow release food if you lay them on the surface of pot plants. Egg shells (lightly crushed) are also a fantastic slug/snail deterrent as well as a slow release food if crumbled up on the surface around plants. I then have my standard composters into which paper, cardboard, tea bags and veg peelings go.A good source of coffee grounds is your local Starbucks coffee shop. Certainly in the UK they bag the used grounds and offer it free to anybody who wants it and I don't think you have to buy a coffee from them :)

    That should of course say "great 'ible' :) Though, you could always start a composting/plant food making 'bible'. Again, well done.

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  • Turn Your Old 2.5'' Or 3.5'' Hard Drive Into Portable

    If from Staffordshire (in the UK) it would be something like excellent, brilliant, very good :) We don't all speak as though we were extras in Mary Poppins :)

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  • How to Remove a Stuck Nut (without stripping threading)

    I found out about vinegar working to loosen up siezed nuts and bolts purely because I used it to derust a load of very corroded fasteners that I had. I found that all the stuck nuts and bolts were magically (or so it seemed) nicely loose :) The same happened with the cola. If you don't normally buy cola then rest assured that the very cheapest stuff is great. No need to splash out on expensive stuff just for this purpose. It would be a heck of a lot cheaper than cans of WD40 too. Here in the UK I can get 2 litres of supermarket cola for 10 pence. While even a small can of WD40 is around 200 pence (£2.00). Again, thank you for a very good instructable, hope to see more as time goes by :)

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  • How to Unscrew a Nut that's Stuck on a Bolt (without ruining threads)

    Good instructable :) Have you ever tried a couple of even simpler and available in pretty much every household products? I refer to the use of cola or vinegar (it doesn't matter what sort but the very cheapest is just as good as top brands). I've had great success with both in loosening up a stuck thread. With the vinegar I have used both malt and distilled stuff but the malt is cheapest. It takes roughly the same amount of time as using WD40. I confess that my preferred penetrating oil is proper stuff in the guise of 'Plus Gas' but I don't know if you can get that outside of the UK which is why I mention cola and vinegar.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on seamster's instructable Restore a rusty toolbox6 months ago
    Restore a rusty toolbox

    Very nice bit of work in keeping a perfectly good toolbox in use. I despair at people automatically going out and buying new just because something has a spot of rust on it :( I mean, if you have the toolbox then you have tools. If you have tools then use them to repair the toolbox. In my case I have my very first toolbox that I bought about 40 years ago. Over the years it got rusty and when I finally got around to repainting it I found it was holed through the rust :( I was gutted. However I decided to cut the bottom out and use a piece of decent thickness steel that had been destined for throwing out until I begged it (and a few more bits) to repair it. I welded it in place (I'm lucky enough to own a very good quality MiG welding machine plus I learned to MiG weld at college) ...see more »Very nice bit of work in keeping a perfectly good toolbox in use. I despair at people automatically going out and buying new just because something has a spot of rust on it :( I mean, if you have the toolbox then you have tools. If you have tools then use them to repair the toolbox. In my case I have my very first toolbox that I bought about 40 years ago. Over the years it got rusty and when I finally got around to repainting it I found it was holed through the rust :( I was gutted. However I decided to cut the bottom out and use a piece of decent thickness steel that had been destined for throwing out until I begged it (and a few more bits) to repair it. I welded it in place (I'm lucky enough to own a very good quality MiG welding machine plus I learned to MiG weld at college) and painted it up. It's now nearly as good as new. The hinges are a lot looser than when new but I could easily rivet them up again in the future if I want :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on ambercollective's instructable How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance6 months ago
    How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance

    There are a number of options open to me with my Land Rover ambulance. I could swap the engine out and drop in a 200/300 Tdi from a later Discovery and realistically get around 30mpg and speeds of 70mph+. I would have to fit a rear anti roll bar though for those speeds.... Or, I could fit later Range Rover or, again, Discovery axles and again up the mpg and mph but still retain the original and very strong engine. I don't yet know what I will do but if I can pick up a cheap 200/300 Tdi engine then I would be tempted to go down that route.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on ambercollective's instructable How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance6 months ago
    How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance

    I bought an ex-ambulance about 5 years ago. Mine is a bit different though :) I have a 1968 series 2a Land Rover, Marshall (of Cambridge, England) bodied field ambulance. I'm still renovating/refurbishing it to my own requirements. These old trucks will do around 20mpg with the standard 2.24 litre petrol engine in them. Some had a diesel which might do a mile or so more to the gallon. Top speed is anything from 50 to 70mph accoring to who you speak to. Mine does a max of 50mph but I'm hoping that can be improved on by some basic engine work. A lot of people swap out the engine for a modern diesel which gives far better economy and makes the old beasts capable of keeping up with modern traffic. Why buy one? Well, if you are going off road you'll certainly not get stuck as you w...see more »I bought an ex-ambulance about 5 years ago. Mine is a bit different though :) I have a 1968 series 2a Land Rover, Marshall (of Cambridge, England) bodied field ambulance. I'm still renovating/refurbishing it to my own requirements. These old trucks will do around 20mpg with the standard 2.24 litre petrol engine in them. Some had a diesel which might do a mile or so more to the gallon. Top speed is anything from 50 to 70mph accoring to who you speak to. Mine does a max of 50mph but I'm hoping that can be improved on by some basic engine work. A lot of people swap out the engine for a modern diesel which gives far better economy and makes the old beasts capable of keeping up with modern traffic. Why buy one? Well, if you are going off road you'll certainly not get stuck as you would with a standard civilian ambulance :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on Drunken Woodworker's instructable Wooden Block Plane6 months ago
    Wooden Block Plane

    Wow! So easy to do, well done. I wonder if there is anywhere that gives the different throat angles (front and rear) for other types of plane. I know that bamboo rodmakers covet a specific plane because the angle of the blade is very much more 'upright' than most other planes. Then there is a miniature plane that I have been pondering in my head for about 6 months (been ill so nothing has been done about it yet). I need to make a plane in miniature using a chisel cutting blade from a craft knife. I did say it was miniature :) It's intended for stripping the fronds from birds feathers without suddenly digging into the main feather and ruining everything. For making natural fishing floats (bobbers to you guys in the US) of course :)

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  • A Guide for Buying LED's on E Bay ---- Part TWO

    Very true :( There are also a lot of eBay sellers ho are now offering low lumen LED's that are being overdriven to give a higher light output. They will work for a few hours but they soon burn out. For this reason I have stopped buying LED bulbs off eBay. I have found that various DIY outlets here in the UK are now selling GU 10 equivalent bulbs at a much more reasonable price than they used to. I'd rather pay twice what I could pay for them on eBay and have the guarantee of them working properly for the 50,000 hours (or whatever they claim) rather than about 20 hours and then burning out :( Very good instructable though, thank you.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on tim_n's instructable The REAL ginger beer recipe!9 months ago
    The REAL ginger beer recipe!

    Actually, that is the way a ginger beer plant is started. I have some rather old beer and wine making books and every one states the same method of creating your own ginger beer plant. There is no mention of this rabid scientific interest though :( Anyway, the ginger beer plant is indeed a yeast colony with other living cultures mixed in it. If you think about it there has to be yeast somewhere for the fermentation process to happen. Yeast eats sugar, grows and excretes carbon dioxide with a by product of alcohol being created. It is perfectly possible to make ginger beer with either bread yeast, beer yeast or champagne yeast. Use a bread yeast and the brew may taste somewhat yeasty. Beer yeast is probably the best to start your own ginger beer plant with as wine or champagne ye...see more »Actually, that is the way a ginger beer plant is started. I have some rather old beer and wine making books and every one states the same method of creating your own ginger beer plant. There is no mention of this rabid scientific interest though :( Anyway, the ginger beer plant is indeed a yeast colony with other living cultures mixed in it. If you think about it there has to be yeast somewhere for the fermentation process to happen. Yeast eats sugar, grows and excretes carbon dioxide with a by product of alcohol being created. It is perfectly possible to make ginger beer with either bread yeast, beer yeast or champagne yeast. Use a bread yeast and the brew may taste somewhat yeasty. Beer yeast is probably the best to start your own ginger beer plant with as wine or champagne yeast is more highly tolerant of alcohol and you could end up with a way too potent a brew; not really what you want with ginger beer.

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  • Kevanf1 commented on HomebrewSupply's instructable Hard Ginger Ale9 months ago
    Hard Ginger Ale

    Sounds great and this is one I shall try. I used to make ginger beer decades ago. Proper, alcoholic ginger beer not for children :) I loved that but I lost the recipe and despite getting a copy of the book that I know it was in that recipe is not in my revised edition :( Therefore I shall try your recipe. You do make the comment that if you over spice the ale then there is no way back. Yes there is I am pleased to tell you :) Make another neutral batch (just ginger in it, no spices) and blend them until you have a palatable brew one again :) Easy and you get double the amount ;)

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  • Remove Seized & Stripped Screws from Motorcycle Engine Covers

    Ah, I didn't know that WD40 were now doing a 'dedicated' penetrating fluid. Good news in that case. Though, I'm an old fuddy duddy and will stick to my 'Plus Gas' ;) Hope that motorcycle's behaving :)

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  • Remove Seized & Stripped Screws from Motorcycle Engine Covers

    Be careful when using those tapered screw removers. They need an almost perfectly centred hole to be drilled in the stuck screw or bolt and then they can actually cause more problems than they solve. If that extractor breaks off, and they are harder (more brittle) than standard drill bits, then you may end up with a piece of very hard metal stuck and a drill bit will not bite into it :( I know of a lot of professional mechanics who will not even allow those things into their workshop....

    I note that you are using WD40 as a penetrating fluid. Personally I will not use this as I prefer a substance called 'Plus Gas'. It's better than WD40 in that it works faster and more effectively. It is roughly about the same sort of price but is a dedicated penetrating fluid rather than a catch all lubricant and penetrating fluid just in case :) The best way of working with any penetrating fluid is to soak the fitting over a number of days. Every few hours give it a little spray. Maybe heat the fitting first with a heat gun as this will draw some of the penetrating oil into the recalcitrant fitting. If this is done over a couple or three days it should (fingers crossed) make easing the screw out a lot easier. Nice little bike (I remember them from the 70's) and very good instru...see more »I note that you are using WD40 as a penetrating fluid. Personally I will not use this as I prefer a substance called 'Plus Gas'. It's better than WD40 in that it works faster and more effectively. It is roughly about the same sort of price but is a dedicated penetrating fluid rather than a catch all lubricant and penetrating fluid just in case :) The best way of working with any penetrating fluid is to soak the fitting over a number of days. Every few hours give it a little spray. Maybe heat the fitting first with a heat gun as this will draw some of the penetrating oil into the recalcitrant fitting. If this is done over a couple or three days it should (fingers crossed) make easing the screw out a lot easier. Nice little bike (I remember them from the 70's) and very good instructable, thank you :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on Hazard™'s instructable Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks9 months ago
    Cracking Single Dial Combination Locks

    Despite what others have said I see where you are coming from with your argument. However, there is one very good reason for using this 'Instructable'. What if you or a friend forget what the combination is? Ok, you could use bolt cutters and destroy the lock :( Or use this method to relearn the combination and use the lock again. Or maybe not and just go and buy a decent keyed lock instead :)

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  • Kevanf1 commented on sixsmith's instructable Dirt Cheap Charcoal9 months ago
    Dirt Cheap Charcoal

    A friend and I used to be able to get both saltpetre and sulphur (called flowers of sulphur on the box) from a local chemist (pharmacy) back in the late 1970's. Yes, we too made black powder, though we didn't go quite as far as ball rolling it. This was of course in the UK as you may be able to tell from the different spellings :) We could certainly have done with this method of making charcoal though as we used to steal ours from art classes at school. Mind you, it being willow tree charcoal it was particularly fine stuff :) Great Instructable, well done.

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  • The simplest FM transmitter... Without coil/inductor

    Eavesdropping or spying on conversations in a different room or location. Place your morals in the box outside the door ;)

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