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4Instructables17,641Views16CommentsAustraliaJoined February 18th, 2017
Ex electronics tech, now sales rep living in the snowy region. Always tinkering fixing or building something in the workshop. I play guitar, I fix guitars, I build guitars. Any project that has wood, electronics or music - that's what I'm into.

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    I think that might be a question for the instructables team. When I'm downloading PDF's from this site, I just click the "Download" button at the top of the page (with the download PDF symbol). I'm using firefox as a browser and just tried it with my instructable and it came up no worries with a PDF extension to download.

    > something i had in mind of making (one day)Well, this one doesn't take long at all to knock up - maybe a saturday afternoon with a few tinnies!> I had some difficulty in fully understanding the operational aspects so would be very good to see a video demonstrating a vertical and horizontal cuts in both directions.I'll do a video, but it will take me a little while to getting around to it. But basically you just take the saw and slide out and rotate them saw 90 deg and then run the caddy along the top edge of the sheet to do horizonal cuts. Yes you'll eventually end up with a heap of sideward blade cuts through the caddy. I did notice that afterwards. What I'd suggest when making this is to offset the saw on the base and do a box cut around the caddy to cut the centre out of it. ...

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    > something i had in mind of making (one day)Well, this one doesn't take long at all to knock up - maybe a saturday afternoon with a few tinnies!> I had some difficulty in fully understanding the operational aspects so would be very good to see a video demonstrating a vertical and horizontal cuts in both directions.I'll do a video, but it will take me a little while to getting around to it. But basically you just take the saw and slide out and rotate them saw 90 deg and then run the caddy along the top edge of the sheet to do horizonal cuts. Yes you'll eventually end up with a heap of sideward blade cuts through the caddy. I did notice that afterwards. What I'd suggest when making this is to offset the saw on the base and do a box cut around the caddy to cut the centre out of it. I basically centered the saw blade in mine. If you do cut the centre out, you might have to make the caddy a bit wider for extra side support to help the caddy stay in shape.No, I left the manual switch alone for now so I could operate it once I have the saw is in place. However I did have plans to put an on/off switch box with a quick stop button and power point on the unit somewhere so I could plug the saw in and fix the manual button on. When that's done, I'll probably add a handle to the base as well to make it easier and also connect it up to a shop vac as well at some point.And of course you could rotate the saw and run it upwards (much like doing conventional cuts) - just requires a lot more effort on my behalf! I chose to do it top to bottom because the weight of the saw will help while doing the cuts (similarly the way it's done on commercial units). The down side is the handles reversed. But because the saw base is square, you can run the saw anyway you like, up/down, left/right (if you're left handed). I don't find it too difficult with the saw at the top - I just use my pinky for the power button. And remember, a 1200mm sheet is only about 300mm off the floor so the blade will start at about 1500mm off the floor - may be high for vertically challenged people, but I'm 1.8m.

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  • Killawhat commented on Killawhat's instructable Create an Organising Wallpaper for Men4 months ago
    Create an Organising Wallpaper for Men

    Your right, I could have sworn it had a title when I put it up there. I've fixed it and done a quick edit. Hope you enjoyed the instructable and got some ideas

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    Glad you found it useful. I don't have a lot of room, so any tools I can get out of the way is great. It's super quick and easy to build as well.

    Just to confirm, you'd like to see some cuts of the machine being used? Or you'd like to see me cutting the materials up for construction of the machine? If it's the first, as I said at the end, I'll probably do a small video using it when I get chance. Let me know

    Sorry, not too sure. I think that's more to do with the instructable site. I just write the content, upload pictures. It's all created online - Instructables do the rest. I'll look into it with them. Glad you found it useful.

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  • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon

    Yeah, the actual frame is only 1200mm wide if you take the supports off (which extend it to 2400mm). Just flips down from the ceiling. But you could mount it to the wall as well. Currently, I don't have any wall space in my shed, so it had to flip down from the ceiling. You might notice from the cover photo that it flips down in front of one of my benches and then out of the way when I don't need it.

    I'll see what I can do

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    • DIY Shop Built Flip Down Panel Saw for Under $50 in an Afternoon
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  • Grounding an ESD Mat and Wrist Band at Home.

    Unfortunately I wouldn't follow your advice as it is quite dangerous what you're suggesting. The reason being is that there is no protection from your mat to ground (it's a dead short). So if something goes wrong working on mains voltage gear - poof - you're dead. Yes I know you said don't work on live equipment - sometimes it's unavoidable. The fact remains - it's dangerous what you propose.What you should do is connect your mat to ground via a 1M resistor. The wrist strap should also be connected to this ground point. Then go from that ground point to your mains earth. Much safer and the correct way of eliminating static discharge.Here's a link - have a read on how to do it correctly (sorry won't let me put direct links in) Search esdjournal for grounds/fsg.htm

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  • Killawhat commented on notsosharp's instructable A Portable Panel Saw7 months ago
    A Portable Panel Saw

    The track systems a good, sturdy and light weight way to go. Unfortunately, pretty expensive here in Oz. I reckon I could get hold of some steel C channel and it could work similarly and probably wouldn't increase the weight too much - and depending on price. That's where the T track profile works well, keeping it's rigidity over long lengths and not flexing too much.As for folding, I'm sure you could get those top supports to fold up and tuck away inside the unit. Might have to make them a little less wide and maybe make the main unit a little wider to accommodate. I think if they were only 1200mm long, it wouldn't make much difference as you really only need the support more-so where you're cutting. I'm sure a 2.4m span would be enough for even 3.6m sheets. But hey, you build the unit...

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    The track systems a good, sturdy and light weight way to go. Unfortunately, pretty expensive here in Oz. I reckon I could get hold of some steel C channel and it could work similarly and probably wouldn't increase the weight too much - and depending on price. That's where the T track profile works well, keeping it's rigidity over long lengths and not flexing too much.As for folding, I'm sure you could get those top supports to fold up and tuck away inside the unit. Might have to make them a little less wide and maybe make the main unit a little wider to accommodate. I think if they were only 1200mm long, it wouldn't make much difference as you really only need the support more-so where you're cutting. I'm sure a 2.4m span would be enough for even 3.6m sheets. But hey, you build the unit for your purpose and it fits your purpose. Which is what it's all about!I did have a question though. It wasn't really clear how you did your counter weight system. Any chance of a picture with that system disassembled (or maybe a sketch)? Couldn't quite picture how you did it. I seen the counter weight slides in the support post, there's a wire attached to the saw over a pulley to the weight. How does that second pulley work?

    Thanks for the ideas. Like most T-track and the like, hard to locate in Australia. That's OK, the actual design has given me an idea of doing it another way before I build my panel saw. A much easier design than some I've seen with rollers on round tube (more traditional panel saw designs). I like the idea of it being portable (I was going to have mine swing down from the ceiling in the shed and store it between the rafters). I might look at another way of doing those side supports so they're even more portable and fold up together. I'm a bit over struggling to cut 8x4' sheets on the table saw! (even though I have a little extra room in the shed now.One improvement I can see is adding an adjustment for the alignment of the saw blade. I can't imagine that anyone would get the saw blade 1...

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    Thanks for the ideas. Like most T-track and the like, hard to locate in Australia. That's OK, the actual design has given me an idea of doing it another way before I build my panel saw. A much easier design than some I've seen with rollers on round tube (more traditional panel saw designs). I like the idea of it being portable (I was going to have mine swing down from the ceiling in the shed and store it between the rafters). I might look at another way of doing those side supports so they're even more portable and fold up together. I'm a bit over struggling to cut 8x4' sheets on the table saw! (even though I have a little extra room in the shed now.One improvement I can see is adding an adjustment for the alignment of the saw blade. I can't imagine that anyone would get the saw blade 100% square with the frame. Otherwise you'll be tearing out the edge of panels (be a problem with Malemine). You could just have a pivot on one edge and an adjustment on the opposite edge.As David R asked if you could rotate the saw base. I've seen a few designs where the base is clamped in and you just pull it out, rotate it and clamp it back in. I've also seen one using a large Lazy Susan bearing with the saw blade cutting in between the inner ring of the bearing. Although to cut sheets horizontally I reckon you'd need some rollers on the base supports. You could make them easy with some dowel and plastic plumbing pipe over them for the rollers. Can easily replace them if they wear.+1 for the power cord to go over the top.

    Thanks for the info. The local aluminium suppliers around Canberra are a bit scarce with these sorts of profiles and Carbitec pulled up stumps a couple of years ago here (even when they were here, you had to wait as they didn't carry a lot other than router bits and a few tools). And these companies only seem to do 1220mm length (maybe they do longer if requested). But, always handy to order online if I get stuck. I night use it to replace what I have on the table saw currently.

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  • Killawhat commented on addictedToArduino's instructable Easy 2x4 Electronics Enclosures7 months ago
    Easy 2x4 Electronics Enclosures

    Cool idea. I've been using some 100x50 box aluminum with the top cut off and some 50x100x5mm wood ends for stomp boxes. Depending on what you're putting in the wood box, RF signals could be a problem. If that's the case there's some conductive metal paint you can buy to paint on the inside as a shielding (you can get it from most guitar supply places - it's what they use to shield guitar cavities with). Definitely a quick and cheap way of getting a project up and going.

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  • Killawhat commented on Killawhat's instructable Handy Spaced Powerboard for Work Space7 months ago
    Handy Spaced Powerboard for Work Space

    Exactly. I'm currently moving the workshop around and I'll be adding another similar one to under the bench for the power tools.

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  • Killawhat's instructable Handy Spaced Powerboard for Work Space's weekly stats: 7 months ago
    • Handy Spaced Powerboard for Work Space
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      1 comments
  • Killawhat's instructable Easy Wall Mount Timber Storage Rack's weekly stats: 7 months ago
    • Easy Wall Mount Timber Storage Rack
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      2 comments
  • Killawhat commented on Killawhat's instructable Easy Wall Mount Timber Storage Rack7 months ago
    Easy Wall Mount Timber Storage Rack

    Hope you found it useful - Cheers

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