loading
2CommentsJoined May 17th, 2016

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • KimberlyL45 commented on deluges's instructable How to do a Western Union Splice9 months ago
    How to do a Western Union Splice

    This is my favorite splice - it is very strong/secure, very compact, and has the potential for cold welds to be created (you are essentially wirewrapping two wires together) with the solder shielding the splice from corrosion.It drives me nuts when people use crimp connectors (escpecially scotchlock splicers) or do a butt splice; strip the ends, put the wires together so they're both facing the same direction and twist them together, so when you lay the line back out, the splice is jutting off to the side (which seems to be the most common method - especially when hacks cut the stock wiring harness to install car audio and alarm systems). Just what the heck are you people doing? Put down that soldering iron, step back from the vehicle and never hack apart a wiring harness again. Ever. A...see more »This is my favorite splice - it is very strong/secure, very compact, and has the potential for cold welds to be created (you are essentially wirewrapping two wires together) with the solder shielding the splice from corrosion.It drives me nuts when people use crimp connectors (escpecially scotchlock splicers) or do a butt splice; strip the ends, put the wires together so they're both facing the same direction and twist them together, so when you lay the line back out, the splice is jutting off to the side (which seems to be the most common method - especially when hacks cut the stock wiring harness to install car audio and alarm systems). Just what the heck are you people doing? Put down that soldering iron, step back from the vehicle and never hack apart a wiring harness again. Ever. Also, what John said. Forgetting to slide the heat shrink tubing on before making these splices is the worst!

    For phone signals, sure. I have no problem with the 110 and similar terminal blocks or even crimp connectors. Phone systems are very low current and there is little risk involved.I've seen those crimp connectors misused for power for CCTV and AV systems, in autosound systems, and in higher power applications as well.Also when I went to insure a ZR-1 Corvette, the insurance company required me to have an aftermarket alarm installed. They would not insure if I installed it myself (they demanded a receipt, not just a demonstration at an insurance agent), so I had a shop install it. What did they use? Scotchlock splice connectors. Guess what? They killed the car - after a little over a year the computer started acting up, it intermittently would not start, etc. - after ripping out the dash ...see more »For phone signals, sure. I have no problem with the 110 and similar terminal blocks or even crimp connectors. Phone systems are very low current and there is little risk involved.I've seen those crimp connectors misused for power for CCTV and AV systems, in autosound systems, and in higher power applications as well.Also when I went to insure a ZR-1 Corvette, the insurance company required me to have an aftermarket alarm installed. They would not insure if I installed it myself (they demanded a receipt, not just a demonstration at an insurance agent), so I had a shop install it. What did they use? Scotchlock splice connectors. Guess what? They killed the car - after a little over a year the computer started acting up, it intermittently would not start, etc. - after ripping out the dash I discovered their hack job. I was pissed - PISSED - that they basically ruined a wiring harness in an exotic car.

    View Instructable »