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34Instructables780,558Views321 CommentsCarrollton, IL
Jack of All Trades, Master of One: Being Me!

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  • Kurt E. Clothier commented on Kurt E. Clothier's instructable United States Photo Map1 week ago
    United States Photo Map

    Well, there are two ways to do it that I can think of.1) You can repeat steps 9 - 14 for the images you want to put in a single state - place each image in its own layer [CTRL + SHIFT + v]. (You might only want to select a portion of the image with the selection tools and paste that since you will be limited on space.) Then move and adjust them individually on the map. You can resize them from here too by dragging the corners of the highlighted image area. I recommend holding [SHIFT] while you drag a corner which will maintain the aspect ratio (width : height) as you drag the corner. When you are happy with the arrangement of the images, merge them all into one layer before moving on to Step 15. (On the "layers" tool box, the fourth button from the left is the "merge"...see more »Well, there are two ways to do it that I can think of.1) You can repeat steps 9 - 14 for the images you want to put in a single state - place each image in its own layer [CTRL + SHIFT + v]. (You might only want to select a portion of the image with the selection tools and paste that since you will be limited on space.) Then move and adjust them individually on the map. You can resize them from here too by dragging the corners of the highlighted image area. I recommend holding [SHIFT] while you drag a corner which will maintain the aspect ratio (width : height) as you drag the corner. When you are happy with the arrangement of the images, merge them all into one layer before moving on to Step 15. (On the "layers" tool box, the fourth button from the left is the "merge" button which will merge the current layer with whatever layer is below it.) 2) Pause after Step 8 above. You can expand the canvas of one image [CTRL + SHIFT + r] to increase the image width of height. Then paste the other image(s) you want to use into new layers of the first image. Move them all around and resize them as you like. Merge all of these image layers into one, and then continue with this merged image into step 9.I actually did method 2 in the example picture I gave you because it's a bit faster, but for the best layout I would recommend method 1 because you can see how each image will fit into the state boundary. I also highly recommended you make a copy of the .pdn map file so you have a backup. Then you can play around with method 1 without worrying about ruining whatever you've already done. Similarly, make copies of any image files you are altering so you don't accidentally save changes to them and mess up the original image.I don't really have time to demonstrate this as a proper instructable at the moment, so hopefully you can get it from what I've said here!

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  • Kurt E. Clothier commented on Kurt E. Clothier's instructable United States Photo Map1 week ago
    United States Photo Map

    That would be really fun, and you would definitely need to split up a states like CA that have so many teams.You can definitely do that - it's all just image manipulation. It all depends on how you'd want to split the state, like having two pictures stacked, then outline the both of them. This doesn't look particularly good, but I just did it as a quick example:

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  • Zener Diode Shunt Regulator

    If I understand what you're asking, you are saying that VCC would be charging a super cap, so the current through R1 is in the opposite direction of my schematic.Like my circuit, there will always be current flowing through R1, but in your circuit it would often be very minimal. Similarly, there will always be current flowing through the Diode, even when it's value is not reached - it's called leakage current, and you'd have to consult a datasheet for an actual value, but I've seen it range from pico to micro amps.As for actually charging the cap, the diode would serve no purpose. Capacitors will store as much potential as they can (and explode if you go above their rated value). If the cap has 2V, and you attach it to a 3.3V line, it will immediately draw current until it is also 3.3V....see more »If I understand what you're asking, you are saying that VCC would be charging a super cap, so the current through R1 is in the opposite direction of my schematic.Like my circuit, there will always be current flowing through R1, but in your circuit it would often be very minimal. Similarly, there will always be current flowing through the Diode, even when it's value is not reached - it's called leakage current, and you'd have to consult a datasheet for an actual value, but I've seen it range from pico to micro amps.As for actually charging the cap, the diode would serve no purpose. Capacitors will store as much potential as they can (and explode if you go above their rated value). If the cap has 2V, and you attach it to a 3.3V line, it will immediately draw current until it is also 3.3V. You can calculate how long this takes if you know the voltage differential (3.3 -2), the capacity (Farads), line/load resistance, and possibly the maximum discharge rate of your source VCC.If you then connect the cap to a 5V source, it will draw more current until it reaches 5V. It will NOT go above 5V, because that is all the potential available to it. However, the circuit I have shown is for providing a zero-current reference or regulating source voltages, and it is a good trick when your source could vary between an acceptable potential and something a bit too high (like 4 rechargeable batteries at 1.2V each vs 4 alkaline batteries at 1.5V each.). This circuit is not meant for charging purposes of any kind.Lastly, connecting a 2V source to a 3.3V zener diode would have essentially no effect, except for the tiny leakage current I talked about earlier.

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  • Buick Instrument Panel Cluster Repair

    Electrical issues can be confusing...It might help to know the year and model car you have, and more importantly, the brand and product number of the installed stereo.The stereo absolutely MUST be grounded. That doesn't mean you have to ground the metal stereo chassis to the car chassis, but there MUST be a ground connection to the car chassis somewhere. Sometimes it's in a separate harness with accessory and and constant 12V, sometimes it's in the harness with the speaker wires.The stereo wire colors are not a standard. You cannot just go by those alone. Most reputable brands stick to similar things, but not always - it's a bit of a mess. Consult the manual on what the wires actually do, and if you used the receiver harness already in the car, those colors usually are standard (and fou...see more »Electrical issues can be confusing...It might help to know the year and model car you have, and more importantly, the brand and product number of the installed stereo.The stereo absolutely MUST be grounded. That doesn't mean you have to ground the metal stereo chassis to the car chassis, but there MUST be a ground connection to the car chassis somewhere. Sometimes it's in a separate harness with accessory and and constant 12V, sometimes it's in the harness with the speaker wires.The stereo wire colors are not a standard. You cannot just go by those alone. Most reputable brands stick to similar things, but not always - it's a bit of a mess. Consult the manual on what the wires actually do, and if you used the receiver harness already in the car, those colors usually are standard (and found on the internet).How did you connect the stereo wires to the car wire harness? Solder? Crimp tubes? Twist them together and tape over them (I've seen people do this enough to warrant me asking...)? The antenna connection is usually just a plug/jack (like a bigger headphone jack).As for the power, typically, it is a red wire that is "switched power" so it is only on when your key is on (also called accessory power). This is what actually powers the stereo. The constant power is typically a yellow wire, and it is wired to a constant (fused) power source and keeps your radio from losing its settings (time, favorite stations, etc - although, the auto industry is decades behind when it comes to this technology). You should take a volt meter and measure these power source.Have the dash lights always turned on a while after you start the car? That's common in a lot of cars, but I want to make sure it isn't a new thing.Without me able to physically inspect things, there isn't much else I can do for you. If can double check the stereo manual for connections, but that's about it. It might be time to take it into a car audio shop (that does installations) for help. If it really is some other external power issue, it needs to be taken care of by a professional.

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  • Buick Instrument Panel Cluster Repair

    Well, this doesn't have anything to do with the instrument panel cluster, but I have done a bit of work with stereos and other auto wiring harnesses.Who installed the stereo? How do you know it is wired correctly?Stereos typically need three power connections: Always On 12V (essentially, straight from the battery with an inline fuse), Accessory (12V Only when key is on), and Ground (to the car chassis). There is absolutely no reason any sort of "power surges" or "redirects" would take place if it is wired correctly, unless you also installed a high power amplifier or something else that the alternator cannot generate enough current to keep running. Given that your radio works with the headlights (which will draw significantly more power than the radio does), I doubt ...see more »Well, this doesn't have anything to do with the instrument panel cluster, but I have done a bit of work with stereos and other auto wiring harnesses.Who installed the stereo? How do you know it is wired correctly?Stereos typically need three power connections: Always On 12V (essentially, straight from the battery with an inline fuse), Accessory (12V Only when key is on), and Ground (to the car chassis). There is absolutely no reason any sort of "power surges" or "redirects" would take place if it is wired correctly, unless you also installed a high power amplifier or something else that the alternator cannot generate enough current to keep running. Given that your radio works with the headlights (which will draw significantly more power than the radio does), I doubt that is happening.In the harness that connects the stereo to your speakers and accessories, there is also typically a wire that goes to your dash lights. This is for the illumination of the stereo display to change with your dash light brightness. In my opinion, this wire is not connected to the right thing, so when your dash lights kick on, the stereo is shutting off as a safety precaution. Sometimes electronic devices have a component that act like a circuit breaker and trips when too much current passes (called an MCB). They will automatically reset after so often (so you don't have to do it manually like the breaker panel in a home).In my opinion, either the stereo is installed incorrectly, or you have some other short in a wiring harness. I once had a cluster of wires overheat and fuse together, but this completely drained my battery overnight.

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  • Team Valor Light Up Badge for Pokemon GO

    Awesome little project, and thanks for the shout out! For anyone interested, here's the inspiration for the Hot-Glue-LED combo: http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Large-LED-Lit-...Also, team Mystic, represent!

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