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  • Kwolf12's instructable Resole Hiking Boots's weekly stats: 1 week ago
    • Resole Hiking Boots
      4,169 views
      46 favorites
      4 comments
  • Kwolf12 commented on Kwolf12's instructable Resole Hiking Boots1 week ago
    Resole Hiking Boots

    Thanks! Paracord is just one of those ubiquitous good tools to have, isn't it? I forgot to show in that step that I'd stuffed my boot full of socks to give the paracord something to push back against.

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  • Kwolf12 entered Resole Hiking Boots in the Glue Challenge 2016 contest 2 weeks ago
  • Kwolf12 commented on AdrianD3's instructable Post-Apocalyptic Boots2 weeks ago
    Post-Apocalyptic Boots

    Like anything else you might build, this is something you work up to--but like many other things, as you start trying, you find you can do it. It takes time, yes; tools, yes, but it's not unapproachable. I've made a lot of things with leather at this point and have never had instruction beyond reading snippets here and there. I think I'm ready to make my own boots now--I need water-boots because I'm going out into the muck quite often. Won't be able to buy what I want, going to have to make it!

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  • Kwolf12 commented on DIYfootwear's instructable Resole your Birkenstocks2 weeks ago
    Resole your Birkenstocks

    ThomasL180, if you haven't fixed those shoes yet, here's how you could get started: Rather than taking the sole entirely off, cut it down to a thin layer and attach the new sole to that layer. Go get a dovetail saw or another very fine-toothed saw. Get some painter's tape and use it to make a precise line around the edge of your sole, so you can see that you're making a perfectly level cut. Here's what I did with a heel repair to illustrate how to tape so you have a precise edge to make that cut, except that you're removing the entire sole.

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  • Kwolf12 commented on marcus2015's instructable Make your own lye2 months ago
    Make your own lye

    Nifty, LeNeveu2. Could you go into a short bit of detail on how you do that and where the wood-ash lye comes into it? I produce a lot of acorn flour, so I end up with huge amounts of tannin and a boiled concentrate does a great deal of the treatment on my hides. But I'm curious about other ways people tan their hides.

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  • Simple Cardboard fire starter from a tuna can(Video)

    I like these things. I've made them and used them for cooking out in the woods. Keep the lid and flatten it back down, then punch a hole in the center big enough for the wick, and place that on top with the wick poking out. That way, you can reduce the amount of flame and it makes a more efficient cooking device or a longer-lasting light source.

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  • Kwolf12 commented on ehudwill's instructable Solar Oven Mark II5 months ago
    Solar Oven Mark II

    Great job and great explanations! Thank you, I'll be looking at this as one of the parts of the one I'm planning to make. By the way, the solution to your in-between-box insulation is PERLITE. Doesn't hold heat, but it's awesome insulation that takes far greater heat than you'll generate--thousand degrees F or higher. It's 90 degrees outside and I am NOT going to turn our oven on if I can avoid it, so this is how I'm hoping to get our pizzas cooked!

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  • Kwolf12 commented on Boreal House's instructable Harvesting Birch Bark5 months ago
    Harvesting Birch Bark

    We're experiencing a terrible infestation of emerald ash borer here in Madison, Wisconsin, so the City Forestry has to go around and cut down many, many street trees. I've just discovered the ability to peel off the cambium with a knife and some string! Yah-hoo! Ash trees, since they're not a sustainable material for bark-harvest, aren't typically used in bark crafts, but I figured I'd see what I can make. Why not? Poor trees are dead, might as well not waste the materials. Of course, I will bake the finished product in a dry heat to be SURE there are no ash-borer eggs or larva still hanging around! Now I'm trying to figure out how to get the cambium separated from the bark--it's a very fibrous and flexible layer, so I'm thinking it would make a good craft material. Anyone have ...see more »We're experiencing a terrible infestation of emerald ash borer here in Madison, Wisconsin, so the City Forestry has to go around and cut down many, many street trees. I've just discovered the ability to peel off the cambium with a knife and some string! Yah-hoo! Ash trees, since they're not a sustainable material for bark-harvest, aren't typically used in bark crafts, but I figured I'd see what I can make. Why not? Poor trees are dead, might as well not waste the materials. Of course, I will bake the finished product in a dry heat to be SURE there are no ash-borer eggs or larva still hanging around! Now I'm trying to figure out how to get the cambium separated from the bark--it's a very fibrous and flexible layer, so I'm thinking it would make a good craft material. Anyone have any ideas about that?

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