Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • LindaR162 commented on whamodyne's instructable Concrete Lightbulb Wall Hook3 months ago
    Concrete Lightbulb Wall Hook

    All fluorescenct bulbs, including cfls, contain mercury, so to avoid poisoning, dismantling is not recommended.

    When concrete is poured for construction, vibrators are used to remove air bubbles. You would have fewer bubbles with some vibration. I wonder if a vibrating toothbrush would work? You could try either holding it to the outside of the bulb (carefully, to avoid breakage) or put the toothbrush (whole or truncated) into the concrete. Alternatively, anything that vibrates would transfer vibration if you held the bulb against it, although for this to be most effective and safest, it would be helpful to mold the outside of the bulb in concrete to cradle and protect it and to better transfer the vibration.

    View Instructable »
  • LindaR162 commented on theabion's instructable Rescuing Cast Iron5 months ago
    Rescuing Cast Iron

    I don't know what the big deal is about detergents on cast iron. I grew up using cast iron and we always just plopped it into the dishwater and washed it. (Drying it afterwards is a good idea, as is recoating it with your seasoning fat, but if you've been frying in it for years and treating it well, you can get away with a lot.) If it's well seasoned, it's not a problem. I, too, don't like the idea of one dish continuing on to the next. If you have a pan that is seasoned, DON'T put it in the oven cleaning cycle or into a fire to clean, as it will take ALL the seasoning out and you'll be starting back as if you just bought a new pan. Put up with the crust on the outside and think of all the lovely meals that pan has given you. One other suggestion: season with bacon grease. It's ...

    see more »

    I don't know what the big deal is about detergents on cast iron. I grew up using cast iron and we always just plopped it into the dishwater and washed it. (Drying it afterwards is a good idea, as is recoating it with your seasoning fat, but if you've been frying in it for years and treating it well, you can get away with a lot.) If it's well seasoned, it's not a problem. I, too, don't like the idea of one dish continuing on to the next. If you have a pan that is seasoned, DON'T put it in the oven cleaning cycle or into a fire to clean, as it will take ALL the seasoning out and you'll be starting back as if you just bought a new pan. Put up with the crust on the outside and think of all the lovely meals that pan has given you. One other suggestion: season with bacon grease. It's mostly just lard with salt, and perhaps a preservative, depending upon what bacon you buy. In either case, it never seems to go rancid on your pan. Vegetable oils, on the other hand, seem to leave a gooey residue and go rancid quickly. Some oils may be better than others (I haven't made a study); if I was guessing, I would try coconut or palm oil. If you're not a vegetarian, definitely go with the lard or bacon grease.

    You need to wipe all the grease off. I've been using cast iron cookware for almost 60 years and have never noticed bugs being the least bit interested.

    View Instructable »
  • Adventure Time: Finn's Hat + Pattern

    My printer doesn't do "fit to page" or anything like that, so I was surprised to find that the A-B piece (part 2) would not align with the adjoining pieces. Because the hat is symmetrical, I just used the mirror image of the other side.I'm planning to change the round top to oblong, and I have changed the shape of the back lower edge a bit. All before I even get the fabric out! Photos later...

    View Instructable »