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  • Norm1958 commented on lonesoulsurfer's instructable Simple Mini Fire Piston1 week ago
    Simple Mini Fire Piston

    As my old buddy used to say, simplest is usually best. Your project proves it.To jump into the "Great O-ring Debate" the lubricant used depends on the o-ring material. The silicone plumbers/dielectric/brake assembly/o-ring lube is probably safe for most o-rings noting that some o-ring lubes swell the o-ring on purpose for a better static seal. General purpose black industrial o-rings are usually a synthetic rubber called nitrile or buna-n and using pretty much any oil or grease on them is ok. O-rings made for automotive brakes require a non petroleum base lubricant such as the silicone lube or vegetable oil. Silicone o-rings and o-rings for air conditioning would probably not be good choices as they are soft and don't do dynamic[moving] sealing for long. I don't know what plum...

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    As my old buddy used to say, simplest is usually best. Your project proves it.To jump into the "Great O-ring Debate" the lubricant used depends on the o-ring material. The silicone plumbers/dielectric/brake assembly/o-ring lube is probably safe for most o-rings noting that some o-ring lubes swell the o-ring on purpose for a better static seal. General purpose black industrial o-rings are usually a synthetic rubber called nitrile or buna-n and using pretty much any oil or grease on them is ok. O-rings made for automotive brakes require a non petroleum base lubricant such as the silicone lube or vegetable oil. Silicone o-rings and o-rings for air conditioning would probably not be good choices as they are soft and don't do dynamic[moving] sealing for long. I don't know what plumbing o-rings are made of but I suspect both nitrile and other things depending on application.The best thing to do is try. If the o-ring seems to get soft and swell or dry out and shrink and crack prematurely your using the wrong lube for the o-ring. O-rings also come in different hardness. If you choose one too soft it will wear out fast in dynamic[moving] application. If you choose one too hard it won't be flexible enough to deform under pressure and seal the pipe, especially at cold temperatures. Might have to keep the mechanism warm in your pocket until you need it. From experience I know that an everyday nitrile 70 durometer hardness o-ring is stiff as a frozen stick at -20f and won't seal anything. 90 durometer is even worse at cold temps.Sorry for the lecture, the project is beautiful in it's simplicity and usefulness. I applaud the author.

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  • Brilliant Angle Nail Trick From Old Carpenter

    Contrary to all the technical and critical advice I would like to say thank you.It's a great trick when there isn't room to swing back your hammer, and that happens a lot when you build every day.I would like to see anybody pull a 2x4 out of a plate with 3 of these nails in it, maybe not technically perfect but a Hell of a struggle.

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  • Norm1958 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-402 months ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Having been a mechanic for 40 years and lived in Northern BC for 20+ I can tell you using WD40 as a hand cleaner works really well especially when it's -40 and everything water based is frozen. As for arthritis, it is fairly popular with the old folks and I'm getting to the stage to try it. Just for comparison, some people use [real] turpentine for their joints.My unusual uses for WD are: 1] starting diesel engines rather than using ether. You have to shoot it in after the air filter and preferably right into the turbo or intake manifold. I'm told the propellant is propane and with the volatile solvent and light oil it ignites well and much gentler than ether. 2] As cutting oil for drilling steel, it seems to work well. Handy, nice finishes and good tool life.

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  • How to Cook a McDonalds Big Mac (But Better)

    I love it. Now a days In Canada we are so scared of fat 30% is considered obscene,I don't think you can even buy it made in stores. Adding bacon is brilliant, I see bacon taking it to a new level. "It's all in the sauce" someone once said. I must say this sauce is as good as any but it's a matter of taste and we are free to mix it up.I grew up on fat ground beef, it browns the patty well in a pan and the drippings are to die for. I'm pushing sixty, 5'9 and weigh 165 so it can't be that bad.

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  • HAND FORGED Cold Chisel, From a Rusty Old Coil Spring

    I love the chisel shape, just perfect for so many jobs the common chisel isn't.I would like to add my 2 bits about heat treating a chisel: I prefer a chisel with the striking end a little hard so it doesn't mushroom so much.What works for me is quenching the whole chisel to make it hard and then "drawing it back" aka "tempering". After hardening you polish so you can see the colours and heat the middle up gently with a torch, playing it around until you get the straw colour on the cutting end and a deeper colour on the striking end. Don't heat the middle red, or even deep blue because you will notice a "springiness" when hammering, the middle needs to be a bit hard also.Spring steel was a good choice, high carbon and alloyed for "repetitive" sho...

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    I love the chisel shape, just perfect for so many jobs the common chisel isn't.I would like to add my 2 bits about heat treating a chisel: I prefer a chisel with the striking end a little hard so it doesn't mushroom so much.What works for me is quenching the whole chisel to make it hard and then "drawing it back" aka "tempering". After hardening you polish so you can see the colours and heat the middle up gently with a torch, playing it around until you get the straw colour on the cutting end and a deeper colour on the striking end. Don't heat the middle red, or even deep blue because you will notice a "springiness" when hammering, the middle needs to be a bit hard also.Spring steel was a good choice, high carbon and alloyed for "repetitive" shock loading, like hammering.When using plain carbon steels like 1045 such as the stuff hydraulic cylinder rods are made, the hardening temp is really important. Don't push it beyond the lower end of the magnet test or you won't get full hardness, [which is fine if you don't want full hardness]. Saves a tempering step. Generally plain carbons are quenched in water for full shock value to get maximum hardness. Oil quench can be used which results in less hardness. A quench of water with oil on top gives a quench between the two if you are having trouble with cracking You can make a pretty good chisel out of 1045, follow the above advise.Axle steels such as 4140 and 4340 are different in that 4140 is usually oil quenched. 4340 because of it's alloys is "air hardening" in that it hardens on cooling in air. Quenching using oil or water in order of severity:-For maximum quench use water, circulate water and add salt if you want more cooling- Water with some oil on top, reduces shock wave and cracking-Oil- minimizes cracking depending on the oil used and you get really cool flames- Air cool- some steels [4340 for example] harden at air temperature, they can be modified through heat treatment, another topic for another day.That's my 14 bits.

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