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1Instructables83Views76CommentsNoVAJoined October 27th, 2015
At my age, it's "too late to grow up and start worrying about the rules". (t/h Steven Havill, in Bitter Recoil) Motto: "Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without." Theme song: I Did It My Way.
  • OneBirdieMa commented on jessyratfink's instructable Unusual Uses for Dryer Sheets1 month ago
    Unusual Uses for Dryer Sheets

    What great ideas -- in the 'ible, and in the comments as well! Almost makes me wish I used dryer sheets! For anyone who says, "Whaaat?" Meaning how do I deal with static from laundry put through the dryer? Believe it or not, a pinch or two of lavender buds. The laundry does NOT come out smelling of lavender but it does come out free of static. (NB I don't use dryer sheets precisely because of the fragrance. Most fragrances and I are mutually exclusive.) And, for the second part of the meaning of "Whaaat?, the laundry comes out soft for me enough without the assist.

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on jessyratfink's instructable Perfect Oven Sweet Potato Fries1 month ago
    Perfect Oven Sweet Potato Fries

    One gazillion Karma Points! These are one of our favorites. All I need now is to make a trip to the grocery store . . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on bekathwia's instructable Cat Portrait Patches1 month ago
    Cat Portrait Patches

    Excellent! I'm sad for you, losing your kitty, but there's always the Rainbow Bridge . . . we all cross one day. // Your work is beautiful. Might I suggest a blanket stitch binding for the edge? If the fabric really is too soft/flexible, try cutting the patch a little large and then fold or roll the edge under to give it more body. // I make patches for my husband's baseball caps, to cover what he's no longer interested in advertising on top of his head. Just another suggestion for using patches!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on bekathwia's instructable Hair Braiding for Absolute Beginners3 months ago
    Hair Braiding for Absolute Beginners

    What a gift! I have long, still-very-thick (I'm getting on in years) hair and have bemoaned having only one way to braid my hair. I've searched everything online I could think of and found nothing worthwhile -- et Voila! An 'ible to keep me happy with my hair while it grows -- another six inches and I'll be sitting on it -- if it's not braided! Many thanks!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on Scout II's instructable Cardboard Box Template3 months ago
    Cardboard Box Template

    Excellent! Both of them! Thank you very much!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on jessyratfink's instructable DIY Moisturizing Bath Bombs4 months ago
    DIY Moisturizing Bath Bombs

    OK, more, after I get over laughing. I saw the comment with thanks for the link to citric acid and went and found it. So I tried the others too. Third time's a charm: Amazon.com comes up with 'frequently bought together' and it's Argo Cornstarch and Citric Acid and Baking Soda . . . MORE SERIOUSLY, I do have an alternative to suggest for the food coloring, however: Esco, at https://www.escofoods.com/food-coloring.html, sells water-based, liquid food coloring with which I've had very good luck. (I use them for coloring everlastings in the drying process. They keep just fine, sealed tight in regular shelf storage, in case keeping quality is of concern.)

    Wonderful! TYVM! Two questions: (1) suggestions on where to get a mold like that in your picture? and (2) have you ever weighed the amount of baking soda you use?. A weight would be easier to duplicate than 'a little less than'.

    In a regular grocery, look for 'sour salt' in the vicinity of regular salt and/or kosher foods. Sour salt is citric acid . . . but do read the label to make sure things haven't be changed since I started cooking etc.

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on mxx's instructable Soda Bottle Top Fidget Toy4 months ago
    Soda Bottle Top Fidget Toy

    Very nice. I shall now overbrain how to turn this into a toy for my parrots....

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on VoxDeVaux's instructable Kraft Paper Floor5 months ago
    Kraft Paper Floor

    Very very nice! I have a thousand sq. ft of old carpet to take up and hardwood to refinish. This might give me an alternative . . . . Thanks so much for posting this, including the problems you've had.

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on YdnicR's instructable Penny Floor5 months ago
    Penny Floor

    Spectacular! Thank you so very much!!!!

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  • Rustic Shelf With Hammer Head Hooks

    Oh, you are right, they are not kindly in the edge department! Maybe I'll intentionally dull them . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread5 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    Sorry to be so slow in replying. Yes, I slash those loaves. They are baked at 490 degrees so the outside hardens fast -- and how else to allow the insides to continue to expand and cook! My husband gave me a very fancy lame a couple of Christmases ago but I'm afraid I just use a very sharp knife and have at it on each and every one! One day maybe I'll get to doing an 'ible on the making . . . . hah! Is there an 'ible about stretching time???? I am going to try your loaf when (not if, cause it always happens) I run out of the boules in my frozen stash. Thanks again.

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  • How to Make the Best Pecan Fudge Crunch Bars

    I just love reading English! I'm not fluent myself, being a thorough-going American, but I am learning to translate back from the mother tongue! (Bad joke over. Sort of.) Please correct me if I'm wrong: "plain flour" masquerades as 'white' (bleached or unbleached) flour over here, right? And 'soft light brown sugar' -- thank G*d you've given the weight 'cause I only know packed brown sugar measurements, and 135 grams means 2/3 cup packed brown sugar. But when it comes to "fudge pieces", I'm lost! Does this mean chocolate fudge? The real kind, cooked to the soft ball stage, using milk (or cream?) and baking chocolate and sugar and and and over hot water? (Lest some American reading this think, "Whaaaa?" just remember that in Brit-speak "biscu...

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    I just love reading English! I'm not fluent myself, being a thorough-going American, but I am learning to translate back from the mother tongue! (Bad joke over. Sort of.) Please correct me if I'm wrong: "plain flour" masquerades as 'white' (bleached or unbleached) flour over here, right? And 'soft light brown sugar' -- thank G*d you've given the weight 'cause I only know packed brown sugar measurements, and 135 grams means 2/3 cup packed brown sugar. But when it comes to "fudge pieces", I'm lost! Does this mean chocolate fudge? The real kind, cooked to the soft ball stage, using milk (or cream?) and baking chocolate and sugar and and and over hot water? (Lest some American reading this think, "Whaaaa?" just remember that in Brit-speak "biscuit" is entirely different than in Americanese. // Only recommendation I'd make would be to toast the pecans before topping the bars with them. Best would be before they are chopped, stove top in a skillet over medium heat stirring every minute or so and pulling them when they become fragrant; put on cutting board and when cool chop them. If the pecans are already in pieces, do the same but be very careful because they will burn much more easily.... // I envy you SEVEN of those bars! And you got yourself up off the floor how long after eating the 7th one? I AM glad to know they are safe 'cause they're now on my bake soon list. // I want to give you an award for the literary value in your last three sentences. Many thanks for this recipe 'ible (recip-'ible?) -- RB, Alexandria, VA USA

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on Boreal House's instructable Harvesting Birch Bark5 months ago
    Harvesting Birch Bark

    I have dwarf paper birch and I harvest the very thin layer that the tree sheds all on its own. I get smaller pieces and larger pieces but all are quite thin by 'bark' standards; they are quite like soft paper -- well, most of them. I use decoupage techniques and materials to affix the pieces to paper (kraft paper best so far) or corrugated cardboard boxes) and even on one very successful occasion to the front of a plastic notebook cover. (I came across it on my husband's desk just the other day and couldn't believe how 'woodlike' it looked -- nevermind that I'd made it!) As far as I know this shedding is perfectly normal and peeling the shedding away from the tree should be harmless. I have noticed that, after a season or two, a sort of scab or shallow scar has formed where the the...

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    I have dwarf paper birch and I harvest the very thin layer that the tree sheds all on its own. I get smaller pieces and larger pieces but all are quite thin by 'bark' standards; they are quite like soft paper -- well, most of them. I use decoupage techniques and materials to affix the pieces to paper (kraft paper best so far) or corrugated cardboard boxes) and even on one very successful occasion to the front of a plastic notebook cover. (I came across it on my husband's desk just the other day and couldn't believe how 'woodlike' it looked -- nevermind that I'd made it!) As far as I know this shedding is perfectly normal and peeling the shedding away from the tree should be harmless. I have noticed that, after a season or two, a sort of scab or shallow scar has formed where the there were twigs on a given branch and it comes off with the shed bark, leaving a perfectly smooth and sound surface behind. Magical, that! I'm going to go look at the projects and see what ideas I can glean . . . . Thanks, Boreal House, for the post!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on RobinJ66's instructable How to Re-Engineer Paper Back into Wood5 months ago
    How to Re-Engineer Paper Back into Wood

    Question: in lieu of a large dowel, how about an old rolling pin? Then the layers could be rolled flatter and flatter . . . . If it could be done, would it be OK to slip the laminated layers off the dowel/rolling pin so it exists to serve another day?

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on In The Kitchen With Matt's instructable Easy No Knead Bread5 months ago
    Easy No Knead Bread

    Excellent! This is the best description of proving yeast I've come across, and the first "no knead" recipe that has seemed reasonable to me, if only because the ingredients are very close to what I use per loaf for a mega-huge batch of boules I turn out about once a month. The one thing I do differently is use between 1/8th and 1/4th whole wheat flour in place of the all purpose (white) flour. (The attached picture is of the loaves turned out one morning some time back.) I've scanned the most recent comments and want to make two points with respect to the sugar and salt components: The bread can be made with no sugar at all, BUT a pinch (or a little more) of sugar primes the proof, so to speak; this little amount is consumed by the yeast as it ramps up its business of le...

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    Excellent! This is the best description of proving yeast I've come across, and the first "no knead" recipe that has seemed reasonable to me, if only because the ingredients are very close to what I use per loaf for a mega-huge batch of boules I turn out about once a month. The one thing I do differently is use between 1/8th and 1/4th whole wheat flour in place of the all purpose (white) flour. (The attached picture is of the loaves turned out one morning some time back.) I've scanned the most recent comments and want to make two points with respect to the sugar and salt components: The bread can be made with no sugar at all, BUT a pinch (or a little more) of sugar primes the proof, so to speak; this little amount is consumed by the yeast as it ramps up its business of leavening the bread. As for making it with NO salt, unless you have a special flour or liquid to use, use at least a small amount of salt because it is necessary for the process of the growth of the yeast. Thanks, Matt!

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  • Rustic Shelf With Hammer Head Hooks

    Very nice! If it were me, I'd've put the claws up and the heads down, and used the heads for . . . . I've got no immediate idea! BUT I want to offer a LARGE TYVM b/c I've got a very old rake head I want to mount with teeth up to hang things (like brooms) from. (Please pardon dangling participle; tyvm, your zero-tolerance grammatical error 'ible commenter :). Back to comment.) Esp. I thank you for showing how to use the D-rings for hanging the shelf itself. Little by little it comes together . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on opersing's instructable Bookcase/Wine Rack/Guitar Holder7 months ago
    Bookcase/Wine Rack/Guitar Holder

    That is spectacular! Brilliant! I'm going to do the next 20 draft designs and see where that gets me . . . thanks so very much!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on makendo's instructable Solar analemma chandelier8 months ago
    Solar analemma chandelier

    My expertise is more with fiber arts (the hoity-toity name for sewing and needlework) -- and what comes to mind has to do with fabric on a stretcher -- eventually to be hung from (on?) a ceiling . . . . but given that I'm about to purchase a new house, it seems, it seems unlikely I'll get to anything that creative any time soon. Thanks esp. for the post of the analemma with solar eclipse. // Question: do you happen to know if anyone has ever compared the analemma with the shape of the Mobius strip? I know, nothing to do with each other, but it doesn't hurt to ask . . . .

    This is brilliant! I've wanted to do my own analemma photos over a year where I live -- but sadly my inspiration in this case runs far ahead of my abilities! THIS, however, I may be able to translate into something I CAN do. Thank you so much!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on ashten.elliott's instructable Peanut Butter Cheerio Clusters8 months ago
    Peanut Butter Cheerio Clusters

    Oh, la! Shades of Killer Brownies . . . . my brain is drooling.

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on Adam Gabbert's instructable Secret Compartment Floating Shelf8 months ago
    Secret Compartment Floating Shelf

    This looks great, but I want to weigh in on the sub-topic of damaged digits. About 60 years ago, when I was a young, young thing, I was helping my dad in his workshop. He was using a router. He left the room for a minute and there was this very nice pile of sawdust that had collected right where I could see it -- so I reached up to grab it and the router grabbed my [left index] finger and put a very nice piece of a slice on the inside of it . . . . It was a CUT, guys and gals, but my father was a military officer and the neighborhood was filled with military families so I immediately had two military doctors attending my cut finger, and got taken to the Naval Hospital in Bethesda Md. where I got seven shots and four stitches and a flexible metal splint on the finger and a CAST up to ...

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    This looks great, but I want to weigh in on the sub-topic of damaged digits. About 60 years ago, when I was a young, young thing, I was helping my dad in his workshop. He was using a router. He left the room for a minute and there was this very nice pile of sawdust that had collected right where I could see it -- so I reached up to grab it and the router grabbed my [left index] finger and put a very nice piece of a slice on the inside of it . . . . It was a CUT, guys and gals, but my father was a military officer and the neighborhood was filled with military families so I immediately had two military doctors attending my cut finger, and got taken to the Naval Hospital in Bethesda Md. where I got seven shots and four stitches and a flexible metal splint on the finger and a CAST up to my elbow. which I got to wear for six weeks . . . . Fast forward about thirty years and I had no contact with power tools or anything of the sort, until I was livng in and rehabbing an old old house in New England and they guys all got to use saws and I got fed up and picked one up and chipped in my assistance and have had not a day of fear of saws or anything (except needles) since then. I have a little tiny scar on my finger, and a budding retirement occupation learning to DIM (as in DIY, but myself, not yourself) about anything. I've even gotten to use a [small] chainsaw to take down a [small] oak -- picture attached. Anyone who's got the fear of buzzes or whatever, it's time to go will come, promise. It just takes time (and God!)

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  • Nucleus Colony -or- How to Start a Beehive

    Jennifer! Thank you so much! I'm in NoVA with friends who've kept bees elsewhere and I've wanted to keep bees since -- well a long time. We must surmount the difficulties of living and beekeeping in Suburban Small Holding Hell (where neighbors use chems to manage lawns, shrubs, grubs, weevils, etc. etc. etc. and that wreaks havoc with bees . . . . ). This will help bring me up to speed with their velocity, AND, anyone with info on IPM for suburbia X beekeeping please give me link or cite . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on randofo's instructable Apple Cake9 months ago
    Apple Cake

    Excellent! I just got a peck of apples, and this will take up a few of them! Two notes, one question: Note 1. Using orange juice especially you can get away with substituting 1/8th to 1/6th of the white flour with whole wheat and not risk the kind of brash edge on the flavor that ww sometimes adds. I personally like the ww combo flavor but not everyone does . . . .. Note 2. Light brown sugar would probably work as well as granulated -- use an equal weight (NOT volume) substitution, which is to say 300 grams. Question: when you say 1 to 1 cinnamon to sugar you are talking volume proportions? So, for instance, 1 tablespoon each cinnamon and sugar? (I usually use a proportion of 6 sugar to 1 cinnamon (e.g., 4 Tbsp sugar to 2 tsp cinnamon) but I also 'louse it up' these days by us...

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    Excellent! I just got a peck of apples, and this will take up a few of them! Two notes, one question: Note 1. Using orange juice especially you can get away with substituting 1/8th to 1/6th of the white flour with whole wheat and not risk the kind of brash edge on the flavor that ww sometimes adds. I personally like the ww combo flavor but not everyone does . . . .. Note 2. Light brown sugar would probably work as well as granulated -- use an equal weight (NOT volume) substitution, which is to say 300 grams. Question: when you say 1 to 1 cinnamon to sugar you are talking volume proportions? So, for instance, 1 tablespoon each cinnamon and sugar? (I usually use a proportion of 6 sugar to 1 cinnamon (e.g., 4 Tbsp sugar to 2 tsp cinnamon) but I also 'louse it up' these days by using brown sugar rather than granulated white. And I'm not usually putting it on an entire cake, but on buttered toast . . . . )

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on thepocketmerlin's instructable Bookcase Secret Entrance9 months ago
    Bookcase Secret Entrance

    There is what I'd call veneer tape that can be glued (old fashioned) or ironed (newer fashioned) on. I have a mahogany countertop on the wet wall in my kitchen and you'd never believe it is made of plywood (admittedly marine but still plywood). I'm sure it's sold lots of places; if i recall correctly mine came from Boucher lumber.

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  • Live Off the Land : Survive With Edible Weeds

    OK, I'm taking a print to the garden. I recognize most of these but would do better to connect them directly. I'll stay clear of the nightshade, myself . . . Anyone else old enough to remember Stalking the Wild Asparagus? It may be old enough now to be on gutenberg or freading or check Alibris or other used book shops or sites. It was 'the bible' to us'n's who were young when it was published . . . probably wan't where wild eating began but it was the 60s iteration. Thanks for the reminder!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on skitz's instructable Raise Backyard Chickens!10 months ago
    Raise Backyard Chickens!

    I sound so hoity-toity virtuous about spelling etc. but I shall tell you a story to disabuse you of any such notion. For many many years I worked as a legal secretary, beginning about the time computers moved into law (among other) offices. Word Perfect (a gem!) gave way to Word (the less said) and with Word came SpellCheck and everyone immediately became hyperdependent on it. I had a short brief to turn out for one of my young attorneys, and it was something to do with (as I recall) public housing. Being young (but older than my attorneys), I decided to read over the copy before turning over to my legal darlin's -- and discovered that "public" had been spelled "pubic" through out. Well! I thanked God (after I picked myself up off the floor), went through and m...

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    I sound so hoity-toity virtuous about spelling etc. but I shall tell you a story to disabuse you of any such notion. For many many years I worked as a legal secretary, beginning about the time computers moved into law (among other) offices. Word Perfect (a gem!) gave way to Word (the less said) and with Word came SpellCheck and everyone immediately became hyperdependent on it. I had a short brief to turn out for one of my young attorneys, and it was something to do with (as I recall) public housing. Being young (but older than my attorneys), I decided to read over the copy before turning over to my legal darlin's -- and discovered that "public" had been spelled "pubic" through out. Well! I thanked God (after I picked myself up off the floor), went through and made sure EVERY pubic was turned back into public . . . . it was years later I read Lynn Truss and got the phrase 'zero tolerance' but I correct to this day out of the depth of horror in memory. // I looked at several of your 'ibles and am quite +++ impressed. Keep up the good work!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on skitz's instructable Rustic Dry Goods Shelf10 months ago
    Rustic Dry Goods Shelf

    Nice! Here's another option: take drawers from abandoned cabinets and turn them into shelves. When I remodeled my kitchen I did this with shallow drawers for spice jars and deeper drawers for canning jars and such-sized containers. They are mounted to the wall with a version of a French-cleat. I did these before I knew about Instructables or I'd have done a step-by-step. I have a few more drawers to re-purpose so if/when I get around to them . . . . right! There are Instructables about repurposing drawers that can give anyone who's interested enough info to get started -- and finish! It really is astounding how lovely foodstuff stored in jars can be when kept in view -- and how much more positive reinforcement of scratch cooking methods can you get than looking at what you're sta...

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    Nice! Here's another option: take drawers from abandoned cabinets and turn them into shelves. When I remodeled my kitchen I did this with shallow drawers for spice jars and deeper drawers for canning jars and such-sized containers. They are mounted to the wall with a version of a French-cleat. I did these before I knew about Instructables or I'd have done a step-by-step. I have a few more drawers to re-purpose so if/when I get around to them . . . . right! There are Instructables about repurposing drawers that can give anyone who's interested enough info to get started -- and finish! It really is astounding how lovely foodstuff stored in jars can be when kept in view -- and how much more positive reinforcement of scratch cooking methods can you get than looking at what you're starting with?

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on skitz's instructable Raise Backyard Chickens!10 months ago
    Raise Backyard Chickens!

    I lived in Denver 40+ years ago and it had the same pattern of precipitation. On paper it reads semi-arid, and the old storm-drain set up was based on that notion -- so when it rained IT RAINED HARD and the highways and roadways would flood. Compare that with where I was born, in Hawaii. At sea level it's tropical, and there's a LOT of rain but it comes mostly in small daily doses (with the occasional typhoon/hurricane to keep things interesting). And where I live now (mid-Atlantic, inland) is one of those relatively unpredictable meteorological grab-bags. Lesson: don't look at just annual precip figures, esp. if you are new to an area.

    This is spectacular! HOWEVER would someone please get the headline writer's spell check to recognize that it is a chicken COOP not a coup. OK, now that that's out of my zero-tolerance proofreader mentality, I'll go back to the +++++ response. Where I live (NoVA) has about the opposite weather/climate of Phoenix -- beginning with hot means humid, and all the rest of the mid-Atlantic temperate zone/four season malarkey. Still, ventilation (or at least the option to increase or decrease it) is probably the most important thing to consider here, too. That said, I describe where I live as suburban small-holding hell, which means among other things AND THIS IS MOST IMPORTANT the county has regulations regarding the number of farm animals (e.g. chickens) a suburban homeowner may host on ...

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    This is spectacular! HOWEVER would someone please get the headline writer's spell check to recognize that it is a chicken COOP not a coup. OK, now that that's out of my zero-tolerance proofreader mentality, I'll go back to the +++++ response. Where I live (NoVA) has about the opposite weather/climate of Phoenix -- beginning with hot means humid, and all the rest of the mid-Atlantic temperate zone/four season malarkey. Still, ventilation (or at least the option to increase or decrease it) is probably the most important thing to consider here, too. That said, I describe where I live as suburban small-holding hell, which means among other things AND THIS IS MOST IMPORTANT the county has regulations regarding the number of farm animals (e.g. chickens) a suburban homeowner may host on a given lot. They can be gotten around, but it's important to do this BEFORE investint time, energy and money in a chicking-loving agricultural project. Finally, we do have predators -- mammalian and avian -- so here having the chickens always under cover is imperative -- as well as having the cage tight to the ground if mobile or sunk a foot or two if a permanent structure. Now I shall proceed for my own benefit to digest this 'ible thoroughly and add it to my collection of information on the subject. One of these days . . . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on Technovation's instructable A cardboard device: THE SHIRT FOLDER10 months ago
    A cardboard device: THE SHIRT FOLDER

    I thought it was DOC and that's why I needed an MD to prescribe something so I could unfixate myself . . . . nice to know it's COD so it will be paid for on delivery . . . .

    I've always thought this video was a fake demo, jumping a point that would be considered sleight of hand but it didn't actually exist . . . ifisher1, I do origami and this shirt fold video is NOT like that. At least, not the origami I've always done.

    Ah ha! That's what I was talking about about 7 hours later (see above). TYVM!

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  • How to Lose 100+ Pounds and Keep it Off For Life

    I will have to read this very closely but on one quick scan, I'd say A++++ -- and better than anything else I've read on the subject. [NB Weight loss falls in my area of professional interest which was/is clinical dietetics. Much of my work involved getting folks to GAIN weight, which is actually harder to do than to LOSE weight, but such is the effect of illness on the human being, physically as well as mentally.] The biggest congratulations are due for your metaphor! I shall burst a bubble: it's not strictly speaking a metaphor. I used to tell my Wt Loss clients/classes that if the day came when they were tired of looking at what they did with food they could just turn their attention to their finances -- individuals tend to have the same relationship with money as they do with ...

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    I will have to read this very closely but on one quick scan, I'd say A++++ -- and better than anything else I've read on the subject. [NB Weight loss falls in my area of professional interest which was/is clinical dietetics. Much of my work involved getting folks to GAIN weight, which is actually harder to do than to LOSE weight, but such is the effect of illness on the human being, physically as well as mentally.] The biggest congratulations are due for your metaphor! I shall burst a bubble: it's not strictly speaking a metaphor. I used to tell my Wt Loss clients/classes that if the day came when they were tired of looking at what they did with food they could just turn their attention to their finances -- individuals tend to have the same relationship with money as they do with food. If, miss_ali1984, you have given even just one individual one piece of information to make possible for them dealing with this seemingly-insurmountable difficulty you should get a medal. PS For those of you whose eyebrows went off the forehead at the statement that it's harder to gain than lose weight intentionally, (1) take my word for it and (2) pray you never have to find out how true it is for your own self!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on Darthorso's instructable Understanding Italian Gestures11 months ago
    Understanding Italian Gestures

    Oh, I forgot to say, from the island of my birth, MAHALO!

    This is spectacular -- and I won't insult you by trying my faux-Italian made up words on you! I know three people who will be on the floor within two minutes of even beginning to look at this -- and that's after I pick myself up and can actually contemplate watching certain Italian mysteries and understanding the 'lingo' I've missed before.

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  • How to Make a Delicious Caramel (on Your First Attempt!)

    You know, that's a good idea! Have to be in colder weather tho'. Transporting caramels in hot weather -- well, I don't think so! I don't even make them in hot weather! And I don't know how we'd handle the anonymity/privacy bit: finding a point equidistant from those of us contributing our wares would the the worst of the logistics. Maybe not such a good idea -- except as an idea!!!

    You know, I think I've never taken a pic of the caramels I make! I will take a pic when I next make a batch. Be a while yet, though; I get a knee replaced on Wednesday and won't be trucking in the kitchen for a while after that.

    "From scratch" is one of those nice old phrases -- I do wonder what folks think when I say it in a conversation! (I'm the same way -- from the beginning, and not just with cooking.)

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  • How to Make a Delicious Caramel (on Your First Attempt!)

    Bravo! Caramel with cream! In other words REAL caramel! I'll have to try this one, for sure. Thanks for posting this!

    And this isn't real caramel. condensed milk doesn't make real caramel. IMNSHO. But I am a caramel snob.

    The consistency of the final caramel will depend on the temperature the mixture reaches while it is cooking. A degree or two makes a HUGE difference in the outcome -- AND the accuracy of the thermometer being used to measure the temp. My usual caramel recipe is actually for a soft caramel to use as a topping -- two degrees more and I get something cutable -- though admittedly it makes squares that flatten and ooze over time . . . refrigeration is such a blessing!

    Use whipping cream or table cream. As for the sugar, I haven't the time right this moment to look up the conversion, but because caramel shouldn't be dependent on the texture of the sugar, there should be a weight equivalent that will work.

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on jordi D's instructable Convertible Bench/table1 year ago
    Convertible Bench/table

    A-plus! We had three like this that were sold commercially 10+ years ago -- and still have two of them. Just on the look-see yours is better in every respect. They have been moved all over our yard and put in bench and table positions with relative ease. (I say relative because there is a point at which osteoarthritis has a comment to make on every activity, even the easiest!) (One tad fancier and it would go in the dining room!)

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  • 37 Unusual Uses for Lonely Socks

    I'm going to be on crutches soon -- knee replacement coming up! -- and I'm trying to figure out how to cushion the hand-holds since I have a wrist and hand that think that any pressure is for -- torture. Don't know if socks will do the trick but . . . Ust occurred to me I should find the crutches I yarn bombed and put it on Instructables. TYVM!

    A small pillow: take a number of socks -- if a lot of socks, some should likely be larger than others. Take one or two and roll it or them together as if they were going to be put away. Tuck this into another sock and fold it over so it's smooth. Repeat until you have a size that might be of use: under a knee, for instance, or in a car against a window in order to nap. If it gets soiled -- trash it. Easy enough to make another!

    I darn socks -- good ones, hiking socks. I'm going to experiment with doubling the thickness of the heel to elevate the foot just a bit. (Cranky achilles tendon.) When I have time. HA! (68 yoa and I had more free time when I was employed full time).

    If you have something filled with rice, soybeans, or anything else tasty to insect critters, just toss it in a warm (like 180 - 200 degrees) oven for a while, until it's heated through. DO NOT DO THIS IF THE FABRIC IS POLYESTER OR OTHER UN-NATURAL FIBER 'cause some of them have low melting temps and this is NOT a mess you want to try to clean up!

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 11 unusual uses for straws1 year ago
    11 unusual uses for straws

    There's another instructable about melting down plastic and forming it into -- other things . . .

    Ever need to add a drop or two to something and lack and eyedropper? Use a small diameter straw, insert one end into the liquid to be dropped (dripped?), cover the other end and lift the straw out and over the whatever to be dripped (dropped) on. Release the airtight hold on the straw gently to make sure of getting only the small amount desired . . . . inspired to add here as I recalled how to do this because I need to put one drop of almond extract in a dish of apricot puree to be dried as fruit leather . . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on asergeeva's instructable DIY Lavender Dryer Bags1 year ago
    DIY Lavender Dryer Bags

    My experience is -- just throw in some dried lavender buds! The screen will collect them as the dryer runs, then they can be brushed off into the trash with the rest of the lint. BUT I don't use this for fragrance so much as to eliminate static (and therefore cling) on certain fabrics. What I've also done in the past is take the stems from the lavender, trim them even at one end and angled at the other and use apiece of twine or raffia or string to bind the stems together to be used as a brush for the screen. I'm planning for a craft fair to do a small container of lavender buds with a brush like this for dryer assistance (or some such name) . . .

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  • OneBirdieMa commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 11 unusual uses for straws1 year ago
    11 unusual uses for straws

    Instructable is great, comments could be combined for another one-two-or-three. Thank you all!

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