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  • How to make a foldable Pikler Triangle (climbing frame)

    As an retired Engineer-by-training, I generally do my best to follow the KISS principle..."Keep It Simple S______". Hence I opted for the less expensive and easier to get hex bolts rather than the socket cap screws. That said, I'm new to the Instructables community and am still coming to terms with the paradox between "Keep it simple" (although it may not be the best looking) vs. "make it fancy" (and perhaps better looking/more elegant).BTW, to seal the wood and protect the project, I made and applied a beeswax finish instead of using polyurethane. My daughter requested the beeswax finish based, in part, about her concerns over toxicity. The beeswax finish was pretty easy to make...basically using a water bath/double boiler to melt one part beeswax pel...see more »As an retired Engineer-by-training, I generally do my best to follow the KISS principle..."Keep It Simple S______". Hence I opted for the less expensive and easier to get hex bolts rather than the socket cap screws. That said, I'm new to the Instructables community and am still coming to terms with the paradox between "Keep it simple" (although it may not be the best looking) vs. "make it fancy" (and perhaps better looking/more elegant).BTW, to seal the wood and protect the project, I made and applied a beeswax finish instead of using polyurethane. My daughter requested the beeswax finish based, in part, about her concerns over toxicity. The beeswax finish was pretty easy to make...basically using a water bath/double boiler to melt one part beeswax pellets with three parts of food or medical/cosmetic grade mineral oil. Mineral oil is often used to oil wooden chopping blocks, bowls, and other kitchen utensils.Here are links to two different "formulas"...one suggesting you measure the parts by volume and the other by weight... http://www.toymakingplans.com/website/how-to/non-t...http://www.instructables.com/id/Simply-Gorgeous-an...I measured mine by volume and made a total of a quart of finish. I needed only about 1-1/2 cups of finish to cover the Pikler Triangle AND the 6' long slide with three coats. As such, I have plenty of finish left over for touch up and/or for other projects. I think that the finish has a very long shelf life.I applied the first coat with a microfiber rag while the mixture was still warm and liquid. After a couple of hours, I wiped everything down with a second microfiber rag to even out the finish. I applied the second and third coats at two day intervals by simply wiping the cooled semi-paste mixture with the first rag and again wiping everything down after a couple of hours with the second rag. I used disposal gloves to keep my hands clean while applying/buffing the finish.Time will tell how well this beeswax/mineral oil finish holds up to use. One nice thing about this, and other oil finishes, is that they can be easily touched up when necessary. Another good thing is that this finish will not harm my new granddaughter... or the dog...when they decide to chew on it. ;-)

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  • How to make a foldable Pikler Triangle (climbing frame)

    Thanks,statestraveller, for sharing these wonderful plans. I just finished a Pikler Triangle and a 6' long slide/ramp for my 2-1/2 year old granddaughter and she loves it. While I suspect she'll outgrow it soon, it will be ready for her one-month old little sister when she's ready to pull herself up on it. Rather than using the adjusting screw/knob or the hitch pin to support the Triangle in the open position, I extended the Pivot Piece by 3/4" so that I could stack 2 - 3/4" x 3/4" x 5" pieces to it. They were attached by 1-1/4" #8 screws and provide continuous support over a 5" length rather than concentrate the load on the screw or pin. I added a 2" hook & eye gate hook with spring slide lock to keep prying little fingers from messing with t...see more »Thanks,statestraveller, for sharing these wonderful plans. I just finished a Pikler Triangle and a 6' long slide/ramp for my 2-1/2 year old granddaughter and she loves it. While I suspect she'll outgrow it soon, it will be ready for her one-month old little sister when she's ready to pull herself up on it. Rather than using the adjusting screw/knob or the hitch pin to support the Triangle in the open position, I extended the Pivot Piece by 3/4" so that I could stack 2 - 3/4" x 3/4" x 5" pieces to it. They were attached by 1-1/4" #8 screws and provide continuous support over a 5" length rather than concentrate the load on the screw or pin. I added a 2" hook & eye gate hook with spring slide lock to keep prying little fingers from messing with things. I also used simple 5/16" x 2-1/2" hex bolts with washers and nylon lock nuts to serve as my pivot. While they are not as elegant as the flat-head socket cap screws suggested, they were much cheaper and readily available at my local Home Depot and Ace Hardware store. Finally, I adjusted the spacing between rungs to 3-7/8"...meaning I drilled the holes in the side rails every 4-7/8". The building code where I live specifies that a "4" diameter ball" must not be able to pass between the rungs on stair railings. I took that as a reasonable, local standard and deducted 1/8" from the spacing just to be on the safe side.I've included a close up picture of the pivot piece showing the 3/4"x3/4" pieces and the gate hook as well as a picture of the triangle in collapsed position...a question that had been raised earlier.

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