Instructables

Phil B

  • Date JoinedJul 17, 2008
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Orangeboard

bbob710 months ago
I had a NordicTrack skier and the skis became warped over time. Does anyone make these skis-not from NordicTrak because the wood comes from China now...It seems like someone out there would be willing to cut a piece of redwood to fit these machines and make some money...
Phil B (author)  bbob78 months ago

I just noticed your inquiry. I do not remember if you posted it on my community post and I responded to it there. Wood will always move and change with humidity changes. The key is to balance stresses in a piece of wood with the stresses in another piece of wood. That means gluing up narrower strips of wood to achieve the width of the skis, but turning alternating pieces so the rings on one piece are up, the next piece down, then up, and so on. Doing this requires careful use of a hand plane or access to a joiner. I once did an Instructable on joining boards for gluing by using a drum sander. A router table can be used for this too. Basically, the wood moves between a fence and the spinning sanding drum or router bit. That reproduces the straight edge of the long fence on the pieces of wood for a nearly invisible joint.

ebony 411 months ago
hi i have a 30 year plus japanes floor jack 3 ton , 2 ball fell out , could you please tell me where they came from the check or overload valve and how they go in thanks ps can send picture if like
Bill WW2 years ago
Greetings from 100 miles up I-5.

I too have retired after about 40 years. Need to learn to weld and buy a welder, then our workshops will be similar.

Bill
Olympia WA
Phil B (author)  Bill WW2 years ago
Bill,

I probably should have taken a welding course at a community college or something similar, but there is also no reason why a new welder cannot learn on his own. Many have. Just do not weld anything on which people's lives depend until you know what you are doing.

A welder always looks like a big expense you will not use much and can forego, but once you have one, you will wonder how you ever got along without one and why you waited so long to buy one. The wire feed welders are especially easy to use, especially if most of your welding will be more like tack welds in specific spots on small things rather than running a long bead.

I thought the wire feed welder I bought could be fitted for gas shielding, but I was confused by the almost identical model number of a similar welder and later discovered it can use flux core wire only. I felt a little regret until I had the opportunity to use my son-in-law's big MIG welder on a log splitter project. I think I really prefer my flux core machine. Everything had to be just right on the MIG or it would spit and pop, but the flux core just digs right through a less than perfect surface on metal.

I doubt that I will get to Olympia very often. My wife was raised in Salem, OR and she still has family there, so our travels will likely be south rather than north. It is good to hear from you. Watch Tool King in Denver on the web. My wire feed welder came from them as a factory refurbished unit at a much lower price.

Phil
iceng2 years ago
Thanks for posting, Here is mine over the week end, It really works !

Iv never been in this position before.

What are the rules on asking you permission to post my copy of your Ladder easier to move ible ?

I would certainly give ample credit to your inventive skill
This was a first project that I made without ever leaving my workshop,
all the materials were at hand :)

If you say NO then I will not post.

A
Ladder1.jpgladder2.jpg
Your ible is way better than some of us deserve! After reading some of the comments, I think my first rule of soldering is to make sure item under test is not under power. My second rule is to ensure that all parts to be soldered are clean. Third is making a good mechanical connection if possible. Fourth rule is use the proper flux, and solder for the job. Fifth rule apply the proper amount of heat. Usually this involves available heat plus time heat is applied. Also one could employ heat sinks, buy em or make em. Have a nice day.
Phil B (author)  GyroGearLoose472 years ago
I am not sure I know for certain to which Instructable you refer. Could it be this one? http://www.instructables.com/id/Auto-battery-charger-for-6-or-12-volt-sytems/

Thank you.
Sorry I got carried away after reading your ible but really it was more directed at the soldering comments to the repliers who were talking about soldering.
Phil B (author)  GyroGearLoose472 years ago
That is fine. Thank you for reading it.
Sorryt again, I was refering to your multimeter article.
Phil B (author)  GyroGearLoose472 years ago
Thank you for your response to my question. The 6 or 12 volt battery charger 'ible was recently featured and has drawn some interest, despite having been first posted 3 1/2 years ago. I did mention using a heat sink in it when I discussed the bridge rectifier in the circuit. I thought perhaps you had seen it. For many years I have thought every home ought have an electrical meter for performing basic tests and people in every home ought know how to use it. About 20 years ago I prepared a handout on that. Finally, I decided to make those notes into an Instructable. I thought it was interesting that some people had come to have a meter, but had no idea what to do with it.
Have you posted the most instructables on this site?
Phil B (author)  PotatoCoffee2 years ago
According to the best information I have I am 2nd in the number of Instructables published per person. I believe the top contributor is Tim Anderson with around 240. Thank you for asking and for looking.
No problem! Thanks for replying! I hope you had a great day!