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  • Grow Onions from Discarded Onion Bottoms

    I have made raised garden beds using mudguards from big trucks.(Have a truckie friend with access to these.) Tie 2 together with gal. wire as that on clotheslines. Securing the wire on the inner side of course and then lining with 1.8m weed mat (optional I suppose, depending on size of holes or damage to guards.) Initially, I half or one- third filled the beds with grass clippings or other garden waste or some rubble/detritus, then some fairly decent soil. Before any sowing happened, I added cow /sheep/whatever manure and compost. The underlying clippings etc. will break down but then each season there is new space for more manure and compost. Around plants, I mulch with pea straw. In the past couple of years, the sugar cane mulch is being chopped too coarsely resulting in some larger ...

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    I have made raised garden beds using mudguards from big trucks.(Have a truckie friend with access to these.) Tie 2 together with gal. wire as that on clotheslines. Securing the wire on the inner side of course and then lining with 1.8m weed mat (optional I suppose, depending on size of holes or damage to guards.) Initially, I half or one- third filled the beds with grass clippings or other garden waste or some rubble/detritus, then some fairly decent soil. Before any sowing happened, I added cow /sheep/whatever manure and compost. The underlying clippings etc. will break down but then each season there is new space for more manure and compost. Around plants, I mulch with pea straw. In the past couple of years, the sugar cane mulch is being chopped too coarsely resulting in some larger pieces not readily breaking down and I find them mouldy below the surface. Sugar cane is ok around larger plants on the ground. 2nd. or 3rd. cut lucerne hay is an excellent mulch on the ground. Where I live in a rural town (South Eastern Aust.,) the raised beds prevent rabbits, and to some extent - snails, getting stuck into everything. Very little snail bait is required in the beds and the blue tongues (lizards) are not affected by it's use.

    You need a good quality potting mix from your nursery/garden supplies. It will contain the required fertilizers and nutrients. Eventually, these will need topping up. The 'el cheapo' mixes don't contain all the good stuff but they also don't absorb water well. Your nursery people can advise you as to which plants require which nutrients. Because of the very hot conditions, it is not advisable to use terracotta pots as they dry out quickly. If you're really insecure about watering, I suggest purchasing a moisture measuring thingy at the nursery or garden supplies outlet. I paid about $12AUD for this thing and it's very useful for pots. (It will be cheaper in the U.S.) It will show how deep the moisture is. I have seen friends grow great veg. in fish bins. They are only about 30cm d...

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    You need a good quality potting mix from your nursery/garden supplies. It will contain the required fertilizers and nutrients. Eventually, these will need topping up. The 'el cheapo' mixes don't contain all the good stuff but they also don't absorb water well. Your nursery people can advise you as to which plants require which nutrients. Because of the very hot conditions, it is not advisable to use terracotta pots as they dry out quickly. If you're really insecure about watering, I suggest purchasing a moisture measuring thingy at the nursery or garden supplies outlet. I paid about $12AUD for this thing and it's very useful for pots. (It will be cheaper in the U.S.) It will show how deep the moisture is. I have seen friends grow great veg. in fish bins. They are only about 30cm deep x 70cm long approx. and 45cm in width. I suppose each would hold a 50litre bag of mix. You are a long way from the coast but there are similar sized storage containers on the market and you just need to drill holes. Don't forget to mulch, especially if pots are in sun and wind. Good luck.

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