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  • Develop Slide Film With C-41 Chemicals AKA E-6(-)

    I've never heard of using sunlight, but of course even brief exposure would be ample. I've never tried it, but be sure to expose both front and back of the film as i mention below.Just guessing, but there might be a chance of the equivalent of 'solarization' using the sun, where the latent image is so overexposed that it begins to be destroyed.One of my references for an early Ektachrome process recommends 10 seconds exposure to a 250 Watt photoflood at one foot, to *each side* of the film. For safety (bulb shattering from water drops) I'd increase the distance to at least 2' and increase reversal exposure time to at least 30 seconds.To avoid the use of photofloods, you might use a standard 100W incandescent, and then a 25W or so compact fluorescent which would be rich in blue light.I ...

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    I've never heard of using sunlight, but of course even brief exposure would be ample. I've never tried it, but be sure to expose both front and back of the film as i mention below.Just guessing, but there might be a chance of the equivalent of 'solarization' using the sun, where the latent image is so overexposed that it begins to be destroyed.One of my references for an early Ektachrome process recommends 10 seconds exposure to a 250 Watt photoflood at one foot, to *each side* of the film. For safety (bulb shattering from water drops) I'd increase the distance to at least 2' and increase reversal exposure time to at least 30 seconds.To avoid the use of photofloods, you might use a standard 100W incandescent, and then a 25W or so compact fluorescent which would be rich in blue light.I used to use a slide projector focused on the film, and moved he film strip up and down to expose the full length.I don't think UV is needed, but blue is. It's worth noting that photofloods are richer in blue light than standard tungsten lamps. The topmost emulsion layer is blue sensitive only; then the yellow filter layer is beneath that, and finally red and green sensitive below those. Exposure to the back side of the film may be needed for either the antihalation layer or possibly the red and green sensitive layers.have fun!

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  • Develop Slide Film With C-41 Chemicals AKA E-6(-)

    Thanks for sharing this info! Having developed a great many rolls of reversal film in the days before chemical fogging agents were incorporated in the color developer, I have a few recommendations:1). Reversal exposure should be to very intense light to ensure high density in shadow areas (D-max). The older processes used reversal exposures of a couple minutes of the unwound film to a photoflood. If you do this, be *very* careful of stray water droplets shattering the bulb, and of course the shock hazards around electricity, especially with nearby water and wet hands.2). These processes used an actual stopbath after first development, a good idea given the reversal process. If you do this, probably best to follow with a water rinse to drop the film pH to a level closer to what C-41 blea...

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    Thanks for sharing this info! Having developed a great many rolls of reversal film in the days before chemical fogging agents were incorporated in the color developer, I have a few recommendations:1). Reversal exposure should be to very intense light to ensure high density in shadow areas (D-max). The older processes used reversal exposures of a couple minutes of the unwound film to a photoflood. If you do this, be *very* careful of stray water droplets shattering the bulb, and of course the shock hazards around electricity, especially with nearby water and wet hands.2). These processes used an actual stopbath after first development, a good idea given the reversal process. If you do this, probably best to follow with a water rinse to drop the film pH to a level closer to what C-41 bleach 'expects'.3). Experiment with your first development times. The first, or B &W developer, is generally regarded as more critical to the appearance of the final image than the color developer.

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