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A second year electrical engineering student in British Columbia, Canada. At school we only do mostly theory and calculus, so in my spare time I fix tube radios and build electronics projects to learn in my spare time, as it's much more fun than coursework. I hope to be able to design circuits in the future. I'll be looking for a co-op next year, so if there are any potential employers out there, please let me know.

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  • S.Leung commented on robives's instructable 3D Printed Geneva Drive5 months ago
    3D Printed Geneva Drive

    In watches this mechanism appeared in modified form as "Geneva stop work," which was attached to the mainspring barrel. From Hooke's law we expect the force exerted by a spring to be linear with it's deformation, but in reality this is not the case for nearly unwound or tightly wound springs. The stopwork prevents the spring from either fully being wound or fully unwinding, thus (hopefully) ensuring the spring operates only in this linear region. In modern (the past 80 years or so) times improved spring alloys and escapement design have apparently alleviated the need for this mechanism as it is almost never seen today. Also automatic winding watches cannot use this system as their springs must be able to slip in their barrels. This picture shows the mechanism quite clearly: ht...see more »In watches this mechanism appeared in modified form as "Geneva stop work," which was attached to the mainspring barrel. From Hooke's law we expect the force exerted by a spring to be linear with it's deformation, but in reality this is not the case for nearly unwound or tightly wound springs. The stopwork prevents the spring from either fully being wound or fully unwinding, thus (hopefully) ensuring the spring operates only in this linear region. In modern (the past 80 years or so) times improved spring alloys and escapement design have apparently alleviated the need for this mechanism as it is almost never seen today. Also automatic winding watches cannot use this system as their springs must be able to slip in their barrels. This picture shows the mechanism quite clearly: https://chronometerbookdotcom.files.wordpress.com/...Also from the website of a fellow making his own watch from scratchhttp://watchmaking.weebly.com/geneva-stop-work.htm...

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