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  • StefanV13 commented on StefanV13's instructable Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe1 year ago
    Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe

    Hey TitchThanks for the tips and info and taking the time to comment.. I found a lot of interesting new ideas in what you said - certainly some stuff that I will Google up on.The Japanese saws are something that I really wan to investigate. I've seen a lot of it in Youtube videos. Then, of course, I looked around and saw Cape Town South Africa around me. I have looked in hardware stores but have NEVER seen any of those saws.

    Hi BrianThanks for the comment, and kudo's for completing a strip canoe!I think your suggestion for a keel is a good one. I considered splitting the bottom of my canoe towards the end, and pushing a 4 mm. piece of ply into the slit to force it to bend outwards. Maybe on the next one!

    Thank you!

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  • StefanV13 commented on StefanV13's instructable Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe1 year ago
    Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe

    Hi T-ke. Yeah. I can imagine that will work well. I'm assuming you saw Rippa's comment on creating an angle scarf joint? Similar idea. Perhaps that scarf joint will be easier to position and get the two sheets flush because it can slide up and down... The outer layer of plywood is so thin that to sand it down till any inconsistency is flush often means sanding through the outer layer and hitting visible cross-grain.Having said that... this is a exploratory self build and if your skills with a router is supreme then your idea will definitely work. Adding that as a build option might give someone else the courage to proceed. There is no risk of the boat collapsing around the joint since the joint is strengthened by the 180 degree flow of the wood from one side to the other. The half-pipe ...

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    Hi T-ke. Yeah. I can imagine that will work well. I'm assuming you saw Rippa's comment on creating an angle scarf joint? Similar idea. Perhaps that scarf joint will be easier to position and get the two sheets flush because it can slide up and down... The outer layer of plywood is so thin that to sand it down till any inconsistency is flush often means sanding through the outer layer and hitting visible cross-grain.Having said that... this is a exploratory self build and if your skills with a router is supreme then your idea will definitely work. Adding that as a build option might give someone else the courage to proceed. There is no risk of the boat collapsing around the joint since the joint is strengthened by the 180 degree flow of the wood from one side to the other. The half-pipe shape adds a lot of rigidity to the joint. Plus, of course, the composite laminate of the glass.Either way, if I understand you correctly doing the joint that way would eliminate the need for that glued piece of wood? As Rippa said, it make a continuous piece of wood that looks nicer and I'm guessing makes the sanding a lot more straightforward.Send pics if you manage it!

    Hey rippa. Thanks for the comment. So 6 years hey? Sorry to hear about that. I'm hoping to go longer than that by keeping it hoisted against the roof in the garage, out of the sun.Your idea of scarfing (I think that's right?) the angle and joining the sheets that way is a good one. I can imagine that it would be strong enough, AND MAKE FOR SIMPLER SANDING!! I spent quite a few hours sanding and glassing that jointing panel. I'll keep that in mind for future projects. Thanks!

    Hi Ossum. Yeah! Cape Town rules. Good luck with the heat for the rest of the week.With regards to the loft shapes... Unfortunately I don't have a very brilliant solution. I figured out that the touching sides of the panels should be the same length, and that the length of the further edge determines the "roundness" or "bulge". So I built models for each generation of drawings. So sadly I can't offer a better solution.I use Blender 3D for my design stuff. I've always wondered how boats are made so that the water doesn't run back up the drive shaft from the prop. I can't think that a seal on a moving shaft can be that watertight?

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  • StefanV13 commented on StefanV13's instructable Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe1 year ago
    Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe

    A pleasure. Thanks for the comment.I was thinking about what would be cool about this build for a scout troop... and my conclusion is that it would be an amazing maths/dimensions exercise to mark out the measurements of the canoe panels on the plywood, and then to see those flat surfaces bend themselves into curves.Having a troop available might make lighter work of sanding, so that's a positive!Also, the experience of working with a composite building technique such as wood encased in fiberglass and resin might spark some future design ideas. Composites are the way of the future and this is a subtle and simple introduction.Good luck if you decide to go ahead and please don't hesitate to ask or share thoughts!

    Thanks for the compliment. The whole process took about 4 months of evening work and four or five weekend days. Would've been quicker if I just wanted a quick canoe. But the seats and holds added time... and the allure of that gleaming varnished finish sometimes seduces one to sand that little bit extra. But only sometimes...

    Thanks!

    Much appreciated comment. Thanks.

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  • StefanV13 commented on StefanV13's instructable Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe1 year ago
    Stich & Glue Plywood Canoe

    Hi there. Thanks for the comment. I'm guessing the build cost at around $200. Definitely under $250. I can post the panel measurements for sure. They are the same as in the computer drawing image, but I can give better instructions? No need to get into computer designa for this. Just measurements put onto the plywood sheets based on the drawings.

    Hah! Thanks. No story unfortunately. Standard old meranti-wood type garage door. Big and heavy!

    Hi there. Thanks for the comment. I'm guessing the build cost at around $200. Definitely under $250. I can post the panel measurements for sure. They are the same as in the computer drawing image, but I can give better instructions? No need to get into computer designa for this. Just measurements put onto the plywood sheets based on the drawings.

    A pleasure for sure to share the build and pics. Proud moments.

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