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  • Tomo46 commented on Tomo46's instructable Simple Solar Rust Removal4 months ago
    Simple Solar Rust Removal

    Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had ...see more »Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had it.

    Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had ...see more »Shoot away with precise questions. Solar panel has a positive (+) red and negative (-) leads. The negative has to make electrical connection to the piece you want to de-rust. The positive has to make contact with a scrap piece of metal (rod, bike cables in my case). The reaction takes place between the anode and cathode in the elecrolyte liquid. As you might know, pure (distilled) water does not conduct electricity well, so baking soda is added (I think I saw Na in the formula). Once the two pieces connected to electricity are dipped into the liquid, you will see bubbles, higher the current, more bubbles (O2 on one side, H on the other). I am guessing iron oxide gives up its oxygen as a result of electrolysis, turning rust back into iron. One of the pictures has the full setup as I had it.

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