author
98CommentsArkansas USAJoined December 4th, 2012

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • The Smallest Workshop in the World

    Really nice job. Makes me feel guity that I'm doing not nearly as much with a great deal more room. Please make more Instructables.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Joebarteam's instructable Computer Control Box1 week ago
    Computer Control Box

    Agree on the labels making a project look like it was done well. Hate to admit that I often (usually?) quit when I can see that it works and I can control it, so my projects look like some amateur did it.

    View Instructable »
  • Raspberry Pi - NAS (Network Attached Storage)

    Same here on the enclosure.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on 4DIYers's instructable How to Make Money Selling Lawnmowers 1 month ago
    How to Make Money Selling Lawnmowers

    RushBayou Like a lot of things, ethanol is neither good nor bad. I didn't intentionally badmouth it. Certainly you can store ethanol in a closed container and it'll be good for a long time. The situation is when fairly pure ethanol is exposed to the air, it attracts moisture. If the ethanol is in a mixture with gasoline, the trace quantities of sulfur and some other stuff that came through the oil refining process are a part of the package. Some of the compounds that are formed when these combine with the moisture are not good for the metal parts of the carburetors. It's not much of a problem if the fuel is fresh and going through the engine regularly. It's when the mixture sits for weeks at a time, like all winter, that the parts will degrade. .

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on 4DIYers's instructable How to Make Money Selling Lawnmowers 1 month ago
    How to Make Money Selling Lawnmowers

    Yes, to Beach-Hank. Ethanol in lawn mower gas is a killer. Would be great if somebody would warn people. I thought the people who told me were just cranks until I found out why. For those who don't know, the ethanol attracts water from the air. If you leave fuel in the tank for a little while, the water plus the sulfur in the gasoline--just a very little l that came out of the crude oil, not added to the gas--will form sulfuric/sulfurous acids and other corrosive stuff. These eat the few brass and other metal parts of the modern carburetors. Not much metal in there, but there is a little and they're important parts.So the lesson is don't use fuel with ethanol in small engines. Just don't. Distant second best is run the tank and carburetor dry when you shut the mower down. But w...

    see more »

    Yes, to Beach-Hank. Ethanol in lawn mower gas is a killer. Would be great if somebody would warn people. I thought the people who told me were just cranks until I found out why. For those who don't know, the ethanol attracts water from the air. If you leave fuel in the tank for a little while, the water plus the sulfur in the gasoline--just a very little l that came out of the crude oil, not added to the gas--will form sulfuric/sulfurous acids and other corrosive stuff. These eat the few brass and other metal parts of the modern carburetors. Not much metal in there, but there is a little and they're important parts.So the lesson is don't use fuel with ethanol in small engines. Just don't. Distant second best is run the tank and carburetor dry when you shut the mower down. But who can remember to do that every confounded time?

    View Instructable »
  • The MacGyver Bat Tumbler (Make a Crime Fighting Vehicle Out of Junk and Readily Available Items.)

    Great job--and a LOT of work. I like it. You mentioned a width of 108" early on. Is that street legal? Been too long since I studied for truck licensing, but I hope you're not having a problem with that. After some width, you're required to have marker lights on a truck. Shouldn't be too hard to incorporate some LEDs or something kind of meet that expectation. Hope you enjoy it a lot and be careful. You don't have the NHTSA to tell you how crash-worthy it is.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Honus's instructable Convert Old Cordless Tools to Lithium Power1 month ago
    Convert Old Cordless Tools to Lithium Power

    It's actually not mainly a resistive load. The ohmic resistance of a drill-sized DC motor is quite low. If you've ever used a circular saw ("skill-saw") and stalled it, you may have blown the fuse/breaker and wondered why. With a locked armature, about the only thing limiting the current is that resistance. No, it's not a transformer, but the inductive component is doing most of the current limiting. Look up variously called "back emf" or "counter emf." This is he voltage generated opposite the polarity of the supply. Under no-load condition, it will be almost as much as the supply, but opposite. That's why the current is lowest then. When the load increases, the "generator" effect diminishes so the difference between the supply and back-e...

    see more »

    It's actually not mainly a resistive load. The ohmic resistance of a drill-sized DC motor is quite low. If you've ever used a circular saw ("skill-saw") and stalled it, you may have blown the fuse/breaker and wondered why. With a locked armature, about the only thing limiting the current is that resistance. No, it's not a transformer, but the inductive component is doing most of the current limiting. Look up variously called "back emf" or "counter emf." This is he voltage generated opposite the polarity of the supply. Under no-load condition, it will be almost as much as the supply, but opposite. That's why the current is lowest then. When the load increases, the "generator" effect diminishes so the difference between the supply and back-emf is greater and the current goes up. In the USA, if there is a drop in the supply voltage from the electric company, we call it a "brown-out." Air conditioner motors slow down, the cooling fans for the motors slow down, the current through the motor starts climbing, the additional current through the armature and fields creates more heat, and you hope the thermal limiter works before the motor burns up.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Not_Tasha's instructable Unusual Uses for Nail Polish1 month ago
    Unusual Uses for Nail Polish

    This Instructable seems to be bringing out some more "mature" readers.Almost 70 years ago, I received a plastic put-together model of a Model T roadster for a birthday. The instructions suggested clear nail polish if you didn't have model airplane glue, so that's what we used.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on RyanM415's instructable Arduino Car Display2 months ago
    Arduino Car Display

    Definitely looking like big boy toy time at my house.

    View Instructable »
  • Repair the Odometer/PRND321 LCD Display on a '99-'06 GM/Chevy Truck

    Great help for me! I downloaded and printed it, but wish I had printed it in color. It was, doubtless, the pin you said, though I soldered the next pin, too. I never accomplish anything in a "reasonable" amount of time, but it was just after lunch when I started and was still quite sunny, hot, and muggy long before supper when I finished. It worked on the first test and is still working. You don't mention taking the battery cable loose. Far as I can tell, there is no fire hazard and no likelihood of shorting anything out. The hazard is your sanity and the warning "bell" that tells you the key is in the ignition with the door is open. Take the battery loose or disconnect the bell.Another comment mentioned the pin/peg in addition to the three white clips holding ...

    see more »

    Great help for me! I downloaded and printed it, but wish I had printed it in color. It was, doubtless, the pin you said, though I soldered the next pin, too. I never accomplish anything in a "reasonable" amount of time, but it was just after lunch when I started and was still quite sunny, hot, and muggy long before supper when I finished. It worked on the first test and is still working. You don't mention taking the battery cable loose. Far as I can tell, there is no fire hazard and no likelihood of shorting anything out. The hazard is your sanity and the warning "bell" that tells you the key is in the ignition with the door is open. Take the battery loose or disconnect the bell.Another comment mentioned the pin/peg in addition to the three white clips holding the display. It's in Step 4, the last picture. You can see the three pins and a white peg next to the pin on the left. The clips were fairly easy, but it was a pain getting the display loose from the white peg. I wiggled and twisted it after I got the three clips loose and it took patience and tested my tranquility. Annoying to put back on, too. I'm not certain it would have caused a problem if I had broken or clipped it off, but I was careful and it's still there.Thanks! It's 2017 now and the truck is a 1999. Wonder how long into the future this procedure will be done using these instructions..

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on zaphodd42's instructable Make PVC Look Like Wood2 months ago
    Make PVC Look Like Wood

    Nice instructable. Many long years ago, I was at a car show and saw the metal dashboard of one car where the person restoring it had simulated the original simulated wood dash. He painted it black and scratched it with a toothpick before the paint dried. I like your method a lot better and the idea of simulating simulated wood is a little strange. Back during the previous millennium, my father called the tool you're using a "shoe rasp." He said it was originally used by blacksmiths to shape the hoof of a horse before nailing on a shoe. He and I used the rasp on wood. They're still sold, though it may take a little effort to find one. My guess is that now it is quite rare for one of them to ever touch a horse or for the younger people working in the hardware store to kn...

    see more »

    Nice instructable. Many long years ago, I was at a car show and saw the metal dashboard of one car where the person restoring it had simulated the original simulated wood dash. He painted it black and scratched it with a toothpick before the paint dried. I like your method a lot better and the idea of simulating simulated wood is a little strange. Back during the previous millennium, my father called the tool you're using a "shoe rasp." He said it was originally used by blacksmiths to shape the hoof of a horse before nailing on a shoe. He and I used the rasp on wood. They're still sold, though it may take a little effort to find one. My guess is that now it is quite rare for one of them to ever touch a horse or for the younger people working in the hardware store to know the origin of the name. Likely most shoe rasps are used for wood and plastics, as you and I are doing.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on randofo's instructable Simple Bots: Wobbler3 months ago
    Simple Bots: Wobbler

    Thank you for putting the video first. Several times I have been interested by a title, but had to look for a while to see what the project was actually going to do. Your way is more efficient.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Paige Russell's instructable Tripod Floor Lamp3 months ago
    Tripod Floor Lamp

    Great opportunity to show off an older tripod that is interesting but not as useful for photography any more.>>All camera and surveying tripods (new & vintage) have the same >>thread size for screwing on cameras and scopes (1/4-20F).Well, it depends on which "vintage" we're talking about. My high school math teacher gave me an automatic-winding Robot-Berning 35mm camera, with its tripod, that a relative had brought home from Germany after WWII. Camera and tripod had some thread I had never seen, near 5/16" and presumably metric. In the box of stuff that came with it was an adapter to 1/4-20 so I could use the tripod with other cameras. A friend had a Leica camera, also older than we were, and it had the same tripod socket.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on diytronics's instructable Programmable Automatic Blind Opener4 months ago
    Programmable Automatic Blind Opener

    As a middle position, rather than two full Arduinos, perhaps one Arduino doing the heavy work and an ATTiny85 or similar to monitor the sensors.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on johnzhu's instructable Full Function Portable Workbench W/Plans5 months ago
    Full Function Portable Workbench W/Plans

    This is great! I don't do nice woodworking, but a portable workbench should be great for all kinds of projects. The ones that came to mind first were patching holes in sheet rock, lawn mower engines, and working on electrical or Arduino and Raspberry Pi stuff. Having an interchangeable surface of plywood or chipboard would be useful when changing from dirty to cleaner tasks. Making it a stand-up bench is something I wouldn't have thought of, even though the bench in my shop is at standing height. I don't have the Ridgid toolbox your mention, so adapting it and my two-wheel "hand truck" to each other and accommodating need to go through doors in our house will be things to work on. Well done!

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Alex in NZ's instructable Electronics Components Storage Cabinet II5 months ago
    Electronics Components Storage Cabinet II

    This looks great. I just picked up some boxes that look similar to the ones you're using. I will adapt the dimensions to fit those boxes and make my small part storage much more useful.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on darbinorvar's instructable Super Bright Tunable Led Light Panels5 months ago
    Super Bright Tunable Led Light Panels

    Very nice project and quite useful. I am thinking this might be what I want over my workbench.-------------------------I regret that many of the recent instructables--not just yours, by any means--are putting much important information into video form. Video is a great way to show tool use and parts fabrication, plus assembly and how the final products are used. It also feels "modern" and "technical." However, it is less effective for transmitting information someone might want to copy, like a circuit hookup or a parts list. And last, It is a problem for people with slow Internet or limited data packages--much of the world--as well as for people like me with severe hearing loss. It really helps if the important information is also given in the text. Keep it up...

    see more »

    Very nice project and quite useful. I am thinking this might be what I want over my workbench.-------------------------I regret that many of the recent instructables--not just yours, by any means--are putting much important information into video form. Video is a great way to show tool use and parts fabrication, plus assembly and how the final products are used. It also feels "modern" and "technical." However, it is less effective for transmitting information someone might want to copy, like a circuit hookup or a parts list. And last, It is a problem for people with slow Internet or limited data packages--much of the world--as well as for people like me with severe hearing loss. It really helps if the important information is also given in the text. Keep it up. Great instructable.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on notsosharp's instructable A Portable Panel Saw6 months ago
    A Portable Panel Saw

    This is great! You have dealt with many of the problems of having a panel saw. At my former home, I had to drive a long way or cut it freehand. Wish I could have had this panel saw then. .

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Yonatan24's instructable Build Your Own Drill Press for FREE!6 months ago
    Build Your Own Drill Press for FREE!

    I had one of the HF 8" drill presses and it was great while I had it. Then I moved and had to leave it. Now I have a shop again and am slowly rebuilding my tool collection. The Skil drill press is a 10", so is slightly larger and heavier than the HF was, though not much heavier. Since it seems okay to mention a dealer, I got the Skill drill press from ToolBarn in Omaha Nebraska USA. It is currently $114, plus $9 shipping. Unfortunately for Yonotan, I can't find any indication they will ship outside the USA..

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Yonatan24's instructable Build Your Own Drill Press for FREE!6 months ago
    Build Your Own Drill Press for FREE!

    I'm quite aware that low-priced drill presses can be bad news, but the Skil 10" drill press has had some good reviews and tests on websites. It's also available for a wide range of prices, which I don't understand. If you'll do a web search for it and look at a building where cows live, the price there is quite a pleasant surprise. That's where I bought mine several months ago and I think it's pretty good, compared with the competition.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Karlstrom's instructable Build Your Own Microcontroller6 months ago
    Build Your Own Microcontroller

    Answering in a general way, many digital components can start oscillating on their own when they shouldn't. A few 0.1 uF capacitors, preferably ceramic, across the power lines and in selected signal areas will often stop the undesired oscillation. You put them in because they're cheap insurance. They're 0.1 uF because you bought a pack of 100 of them cheap so you'd have them handy. The old 7805 voltage regulator COULD oscillate in very rare circumstances and a 0.1 from output to ground would prevent it. The 330 ohm resistors are a common size to limit current through a cheap LED in a 5 volt circuit. Again, it's this value because you bought a bag of 100 or 500 when you bought the big bag of cheap LEDs, so you would have them on hand. You probably wouldn't notice the difference i...

    see more »

    Answering in a general way, many digital components can start oscillating on their own when they shouldn't. A few 0.1 uF capacitors, preferably ceramic, across the power lines and in selected signal areas will often stop the undesired oscillation. You put them in because they're cheap insurance. They're 0.1 uF because you bought a pack of 100 of them cheap so you'd have them handy. The old 7805 voltage regulator COULD oscillate in very rare circumstances and a 0.1 from output to ground would prevent it. The 330 ohm resistors are a common size to limit current through a cheap LED in a 5 volt circuit. Again, it's this value because you bought a bag of 100 or 500 when you bought the big bag of cheap LEDs, so you would have them on hand. You probably wouldn't notice the difference if you used 270 ohms or 390 ohms. The 10K resistors are a common size to hold an unused input high or low. The 100 ohm resistors are also a common size, with lots of uses. If you have an input with a 10K resistor holding it high, a 100 ohm resistor to groundcan be used to pull it low when you need it.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on shatrovmaxim's instructable CNC Miil Box6 months ago
    CNC Miil Box

    Thank you. One thing I like about instructables is so many of the projects provide ideas that can be modified to meet a different need. I don't have a CNC or have these tool bits to put away, but I have a large number of specialized screwdrivers and nut drivers. As you said at the beginning--such tools are stored in boxes so sorting and finding what is needed is a problem. With some adapting, this will be much better than the other ideas I have seen or imagined.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw6 months ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    One way to get the pressure is to chuck the appropriate screwdriver bit in a bit brace, if you have such an older technology tool in your shop. You can put quite a bit of force pushing the screwdriver tip into the damaged screw while you try to turn it.

    Without the implied personal attack, a "left-hand" drill bit is going to try to advance while rotating counter-clockwise. Use it to drill a hole through the center of a stuck bolt/screw. As you are removing the core, you are also weakening the bolt. At some point, the threads often come loose from what it's screwed into and will back out and follow the drill bit's path. A limitation, of course, is the bolt/screw has to be big enough you can drill through its center without engaging and damaging the threads. If the bolt is very small, drilling without breaking the bit is a challenge. Holding the drill steady is difficult, so using a drill press is helpful you can get the part into place in the drill press. A problem with some hand-held drills is the chuck is threaded onto ...

    see more »

    Without the implied personal attack, a "left-hand" drill bit is going to try to advance while rotating counter-clockwise. Use it to drill a hole through the center of a stuck bolt/screw. As you are removing the core, you are also weakening the bolt. At some point, the threads often come loose from what it's screwed into and will back out and follow the drill bit's path. A limitation, of course, is the bolt/screw has to be big enough you can drill through its center without engaging and damaging the threads. If the bolt is very small, drilling without breaking the bit is a challenge. Holding the drill steady is difficult, so using a drill press is helpful you can get the part into place in the drill press. A problem with some hand-held drills is the chuck is threaded onto its shaft and might come loose while you are using it in reverse.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on AroundHome's instructable Drill Press Table and Fence6 months ago
    Drill Press Table and Fence

    Thanks for a well-done explanation. I just got a drill press and this would be a nice addition.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on LetsMakeWithSteve's instructable How to Make a Shelf/Bike Rack7 months ago
    How to Make a Shelf/Bike Rack

    In addition to the craftsmanship and methodology, this one contains one more factor--a core idea that can be adapted and expanded to make it fit a need. I'm a Trail Watcher. I carry small tools, tire patches, and odd items to help somebody stranded on the trail. I need a bigger box on this rack. No problem at all--make it twice as tall as it is wide and put a shelf/divider in the middle. There is nothing to keep you from making it floor to ceiling--well, except for possibly looking really strange. Maybe only single guys should do that. I don't have great grandchildren yet, but I can see adapting something like this to park a jogging stroller and "diaper bag." Perhaps a folding umbrella and cover for the baby. Well done, Steve.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on korinM's instructable Cardboard Shelving without screw nor glue...7 months ago
    Cardboard Shelving without screw nor glue...

    Wonderful creativity. Thank you for making the instructable.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on MK DIY's instructable MK: DIY Milling Table for Drill Press7 months ago
    MK: DIY Milling Table for Drill Press

    I was wishing for something like this yesterday, when I had about 50 holes to drill in four rows. I used a framing square and a pencil and got the job done, but if I had very many of those parts to make, I'd use your idea. If I understand correctly, you are using plywood (looks like the spruce, pine, or fir we get in the USA) for all the parts. As soft as woods those are and with their coarse grain, I would expect the parts rubbing together will wear rather quickly. You might think of replacing one side with a very hard wood (maple comes to mind) and providing some sort of lubrication. Easiest lubrication might be to rub a cheap candle on the surface. The candle wax won't get as dirty as some other lubricants might. Another option would be to lay a strip of sheet metal, maybe alum...

    see more »

    I was wishing for something like this yesterday, when I had about 50 holes to drill in four rows. I used a framing square and a pencil and got the job done, but if I had very many of those parts to make, I'd use your idea. If I understand correctly, you are using plywood (looks like the spruce, pine, or fir we get in the USA) for all the parts. As soft as woods those are and with their coarse grain, I would expect the parts rubbing together will wear rather quickly. You might think of replacing one side with a very hard wood (maple comes to mind) and providing some sort of lubrication. Easiest lubrication might be to rub a cheap candle on the surface. The candle wax won't get as dirty as some other lubricants might. Another option would be to lay a strip of sheet metal, maybe aluminum, on one side for the wood to rub against. Use the candle wax or something on this, too. Should help with the sticking that is probably making the table move unevenly. . .

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on nicengineering's instructable Low Budget CNC7 months ago
    Low Budget CNC

    Calling this a "Low Budget CNC" takes me back. In 1978 I set out to design a CNC programming trainer that could be sold to technical schools for less than $5000. The first one was controlled by a Commodore PET and a later version by a Commodore 64. All the electronics were ordinary ICs, like AND and OR gates, counters, etc., connected to discrete transistors to operate the stepping motors. Control was in 6502 assembly/machine language. Because so much of the effort was volunteer labor by very talented people and a part of the materials was from surplus and recovered sources, I never had a good idea what it would cost to build one. However, we ended up with one in each of five schools and they were used for several years. Definitely never sold any for profit. When the Ard...

    see more »

    Calling this a "Low Budget CNC" takes me back. In 1978 I set out to design a CNC programming trainer that could be sold to technical schools for less than $5000. The first one was controlled by a Commodore PET and a later version by a Commodore 64. All the electronics were ordinary ICs, like AND and OR gates, counters, etc., connected to discrete transistors to operate the stepping motors. Control was in 6502 assembly/machine language. Because so much of the effort was volunteer labor by very talented people and a part of the materials was from surplus and recovered sources, I never had a good idea what it would cost to build one. However, we ended up with one in each of five schools and they were used for several years. Definitely never sold any for profit. When the Arduino came along, I began having dreams of how much much easier it would have been to design and build the first ones and how much their capabilities could have been enhanced. Well done! I am truly impressed.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd followed Kandrix7 months ago
      • Wooden Fidget Hand Spinner under $1
      • Handheld Flood/Spot Light (2-10k lumens)
      • DIY 15 Watt Stereo Amplifier (Portable)
  • UncleEd commented on p_leriche's instructable Fibreoptic Christmas Tree Upgrade7 months ago
    Fibreoptic Christmas Tree Upgrade

    Thank you for the instructable. I'm disappointed I just put all the Christmas stuff away so can't check out the little tree, but now I can have several months to perfect my color system. I like that you included the small controllers as possibilties.

    View Instructable »
  • How to use circuits.io for Arduino projects (and embed projects on other sites)

    Yes. I just like the flash effect on the LED. We could suppose that with 16V and 2A, this one is going to be dark rather quickly.

    View Instructable »
  • How to use circuits.io for Arduino projects (and embed projects on other sites)

    +1 on recommending the circuits.io site. Its capabilities are impressive. A time or two, it found hookup errors I hadn't noticed. (My paper and pencil diagram were correct but I hadn't connected it that way.) It's also funny if you leave out the current limiting resistor on an LED.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on AshokK17's instructable Arduino (Increase Power Port Pins)8 months ago
    Arduino (Increase Power Port Pins)

    Thank you. I like the idea of having a neat and convenient place to plug things in, but you might caution that having more places to plug in doesn't "create" more power. All of the power has to come either through the USB connection you're using or the Arduino's on-board regulator. Both of these are quite limited in capacity, particularly the on-board regulator. Personally, I would be reluctant to add a total load greater than two or three LEDs to this connector, for fear of overloading the regulator and having it shut down. That protects the regulator, but might result in an intermittent failure that will be terribly difficult to troubleshoot. .

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on AshokK17's instructable Arduino (Increase Power Port Pins)8 months ago
    Arduino (Increase Power Port Pins)

    If that is a REGULATED 5V 6A power supply, and I'm hoping it is, it will be fine for powering an Arduino or other electronic devices. The 6A may be more current capacity than you need, depending on what else you have connected to it. More capacity than you need is a nice condition, like having more money than you need to pay your bills. Don't plan on connecting a 7805 to it, not that you would need to, because the 7805 needs roughly 7.5V or above at its input. Below 7.5V and there won't be enough difference between the 5V output and the input voltage to operate the electronics in the chip. The higher you go above the 7.5V, the greater the amount of heat (watts = voltage dropped x current) the regulator has to dissipate, which might mean a heat sink. If it gets too hot to keep your ...

    see more »

    If that is a REGULATED 5V 6A power supply, and I'm hoping it is, it will be fine for powering an Arduino or other electronic devices. The 6A may be more current capacity than you need, depending on what else you have connected to it. More capacity than you need is a nice condition, like having more money than you need to pay your bills. Don't plan on connecting a 7805 to it, not that you would need to, because the 7805 needs roughly 7.5V or above at its input. Below 7.5V and there won't be enough difference between the 5V output and the input voltage to operate the electronics in the chip. The higher you go above the 7.5V, the greater the amount of heat (watts = voltage dropped x current) the regulator has to dissipate, which might mean a heat sink. If it gets too hot to keep your finger on, its thermal protection circuit may shut it down. There is an upper input limit around 25-30V, but you'd ordinarily try to avoid having the regulator deal with that much difference, if you could.

    View Instructable »
  • Hundreds of LEDs on Arduino: a New Way From the Past

    Thank you. I'll go looking.

    View Instructable »
  • Hundreds of LEDs on Arduino: a New Way From the Past

    This is interesting. Is there a convenient and reasonably priced source for these chips? I don't think I've ever seen them. (You aren't surprised, I can tell.)

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on stoppi71's instructable Arduino Segway9 months ago
    Arduino Segway

    A big problem with specifying the motors is the starting loads are so much greater than the running load. Worse, the motors are starting, stopping and changing speed every few seconds while adjusting the direction to stay on course. The torque output will be changing constantly. Having motors with plenty of capacity may help their lifespan.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Barzok's instructable Led Matrix Arduino Clock10 months ago
    Led Matrix Arduino Clock

    Truly elegant in its simplicity. One of the few I've considered building. Well done!

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on lingib's instructable CNC Drum Plotter10 months ago
    CNC Drum Plotter

    Nice job! Been a while since I've seen a drum plotter. Years ago, they were commonly used for very specific purposes, such as weather maps, but other hard-copy means have pretty much taken their place.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on woodshopcowboy's instructable Stackable Shop Storage Boxes 11 months ago
    Stackable Shop Storage Boxes

    Really nice and definitely useful. I may have to learn to use a router.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on powertothepeople's instructable Portable Arduino Prototyping Box12 months ago
    Portable Arduino Prototyping Box

    Nice job and thank you for using materials and tools I have on hand. The projects with laser/plasma cutters and 3D printers are interesting, but I don't have access to those in my part of the rural South. Scrap plywood, glue, a drill and bits, a saw, and a few wood screws are much easier to locate in my shop.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on jimustanguitar's instructable De-Rust Your Old Table Saw12 months ago
    De-Rust Your Old Table Saw

    Thank you for the warning not to use silicones on the saw table. I probably would have used it, never thinking about its possible effects on nice finishes.

    View Instructable »
  • How to Unscrew a Nut that's Stuck on a Bolt (without ruining threads)

    I used to think the way you are in the first few sentences. If you're right next to the store that sells the threaded rod, you can do it. Problems come (1) when the store that has the rod is miles away or the size you need is not available that day and time is an issue or (2) when the threaded rod/bolt/whatever is a part of something valuable that you can't replace in quickly or cheaply.If you get ten mechanics over 40 years old, you can probably get thirty ideas about the best penetrating oil. The "best" only counts when you're at the store buying it. Otherwise, the best is what you have or can find on short notice. When the can is missing or empty, 10 weight oil mixed with kerosene works pretty well. Or oil mixed with diesel fuel. Or mixed with gasoline, if sparks and ...

    see more »

    I used to think the way you are in the first few sentences. If you're right next to the store that sells the threaded rod, you can do it. Problems come (1) when the store that has the rod is miles away or the size you need is not available that day and time is an issue or (2) when the threaded rod/bolt/whatever is a part of something valuable that you can't replace in quickly or cheaply.If you get ten mechanics over 40 years old, you can probably get thirty ideas about the best penetrating oil. The "best" only counts when you're at the store buying it. Otherwise, the best is what you have or can find on short notice. When the can is missing or empty, 10 weight oil mixed with kerosene works pretty well. Or oil mixed with diesel fuel. Or mixed with gasoline, if sparks and fires are not nearby. Or kerosene or diesel fuel alone, if there isn't any oil handy. And you can get a few drops of oil from wiping off the dipstick with your finger. Depends on how desperate you are. .

    View Instructable »
  • Homemade Table Saw Fence Mechanism

    It's a great project and I may have one on my list before. However, I have to agree with @3ra1n1ac. that having your fingers that close to the blade of the tablesaw is an awful idea and a terrible example for people who are trying to learn.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on BobbyArndt's instructable Folding Tables Counter Height1 year ago
    Folding Tables Counter Height

    "...I have seen my sales increase at craft fairs since I adjusted table height."That sounds totally unreasonable for about five seconds, then I think of how much easier it would be to examine something that's for sale if it is closer to my eyes to start with. Great point and great instructable. I see a table right beside me that's about to grow a few inches.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Neo2119's instructable Industrial Design Table1 year ago
    Industrial Design Table

    Nice table and great instructable. When I saw 41 inches for the height, you had my attention. Having to bend over to reach what I'm working on is not pleasant when you're well over six feet/180 cm.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on Elias Stratakos's instructable Wall Tool Holders1 year ago
    Wall Tool Holders

    This is a great instructable and my tools would really look nice and, more importantly, be easier to find so I could use them if I had this. Will be thinking.Magnetic tool holders are truly a mixed blessing. The good is the convenience and flexibility--of storing the tools. The bad is that the tools will be magnetized and if your life is like mine, there will be enough tiny filings attracted to the magnets to make your life miserable. I don't have a magnetic tool holder, but stray magnetism from whatever source it comes means the tips of my Phillips screwdrivers always have iron filings around them. A magnetic tool holder will mean any and all iron/steel (not real stainless steel) tools will pick up filings, brads, small washers, and about anything else that's magnetic, usually wh...

    see more »

    This is a great instructable and my tools would really look nice and, more importantly, be easier to find so I could use them if I had this. Will be thinking.Magnetic tool holders are truly a mixed blessing. The good is the convenience and flexibility--of storing the tools. The bad is that the tools will be magnetized and if your life is like mine, there will be enough tiny filings attracted to the magnets to make your life miserable. I don't have a magnetic tool holder, but stray magnetism from whatever source it comes means the tips of my Phillips screwdrivers always have iron filings around them. A magnetic tool holder will mean any and all iron/steel (not real stainless steel) tools will pick up filings, brads, small washers, and about anything else that's magnetic, usually when I don't have a spare hand to sweep them off. If this will definitely NOT be a problem, then it's a great idea.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on seamster's instructable Build a wooden fence and gate1 year ago
    Build a wooden fence and gate

    The word is the gate (and other parts of the fence) I'm going to repair were built by a "professional." I'm forced to conclude that "professional" means he was from [nearby large town], and (2) he has a nailgun.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on seamster's instructable Build a wooden fence and gate1 year ago
    Build a wooden fence and gate

    I'm not going to build a new fence, but wanted to see if I could learn something. I did."Diagonal cross-braces like this should always angle downward to the lower hinge."You got me wondering why, so I went to other websites and saw the same thing. I finally saw that this puts the compression load from the brace into the gate hinge, rather than into thin air--like on the sagging gate into my back yard. Thanks!

    View Instructable »
  • KeyPi - A cheap portable Raspberry Pi 3 "Laptop" under $80

    @DanielD4, can't agree on the not practical. I'd suggest that the uses are apt to be specialized, though. Years ago, when I was doing networks in businesses and schools, laptops were not cheap enough for me to carry one with me. (And they were fat and heavy back then, too.) Something like this would be handy now for someone doing service work on odd things like electronic home furnace controls or refrigerators. But the challenge of getting something like this to work to do anything is enough to make me think of it. When you were through, most of the parts that make it up could be disassembled and used for something else, if you needed them and didn't need the "laptop," so the money wouldn't be totally wasted.

    View Instructable »
  • High Precision Cardboard CNC Drawing Machine

    I'm with the people who say it's too expensive, as I don't yet see a need for it as is. But...there are several parts to this and I might adapt one or more of them to something I do need. That's the benefit of having these things on Instructables. Another side of me remembers the benefits of designing and building something complex and learning as I go to make the whole system work. That can be a tremendous accomplishment.

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on mikeasaurus's instructable No-wrinkle Button Seam1 year ago
    No-wrinkle Button Seam

    @mizar5 Yes! Those awful pocket flaps! Thank you for seeing the additional possibility!

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on carl5blum's instructable Triple Your Tool Storage Space!1 year ago
    Triple Your Tool Storage Space!

    Great job on the workshop and great instructable. The amount of guilt accumulated by people who read this and then think about the condition of their tools will be phenomenal. Somebody mentioned magnetic strips for holding tools. The downside is using tools in conditions where there are iron filings and the dust from sawing iron and steel. Can be terribly annoying if the tools are magnetized and many of them get magnetized, anyway. However, they'd be great--most of the time--in a woodworking shop. Okay. I'm starting on where to put the rack and how to support it. I'm big on planning and your descriptions and pictures have done a tremendous part of that for it.Thanks!

    View Instructable »
  • UncleEd commented on SpecificLove's instructable 8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool1 year ago
    8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool

    The steel wool has to be crammed into the crack or hole very tightly. I can see their stripping off pieces from a pad of steel wool--or even from the loose ends sticking out of the hole in the picture in the article. I wouldn't think steel wool would be comfortable to sleep on, but I'm not a mouse.Steel wool crammed in cracks and around pipes also stops small insects, according to our exterminator.

    View Instructable »