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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 week ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi John,It's hard to comment without more detail. 19mm cladding is generally viewed as a good thickness for sheds so it should do the job. There's no information on the frame work sizes. It would be a good way to get the basic structure in place if you don't have the time/skills to do it yourself. Beware though that all the paint, varnish, insulation, internal finishings, stove etc required to finish the hut adds a lot of time or cost. That's why theirs is so cheap, compared to others.

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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 week ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi,The link seems to be broken. Can you re-post it? I've not seen the kits, sounds interesting.

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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 week ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi Eckyg,I just took along a light-bar, fixed it to the chassis with screws, plugged it into the tow bar socket and towed it home behind my car. I had to use an extension cable on the light bar because the chassis was so long.It was towable, the moving parts on these chassis, especially ALKO (German made) ones, seem to last a long time.

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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels2 months ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi,I would think that 3mm on the inside is fine but the outer skin would need to be thicker, in my opinion. I am not an engineer though, so I may be wrong. I used 9mm OSB (oriented strand board) on the outside.It is a strong way to build, making a sandwich of stud wall with ply skin. I was surprised just how rigid it ends up, so a thinner skin may well be OK. Ply would be stronger than OSB I reckon. Weight is a key issue, its easy to end up heavier than you planned. A building engineer could do calculations for you to work out optimal sizes. You could make up a test panel to try out your design.

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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 year ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi Hazel,If you take measurements from a touring caravan that will let you see what is "allowed". I think 8ft wide seems to be the maximum for towing with a car. I'm sure DVLA or VOSA could advise.

    Thank you for your encouraging comment.

    Hi,I'm in Scotland (UK) The chassis is the base of an old touring caravan. They can be bought here for £50 - £150 for a twin axle model. I'm talking about something that might be 20 years old or more, so basically scrap/salvage material. The wheel bearings and brakes are often fine though, caravans tend to be very under-used as road vehicles.

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  • Wulbert commented on Wulbert's instructable A Hut on Wheels1 year ago
    A Hut on Wheels

    Hi, This is covered in the description and also in the comments below. The cost was around £4,500 GBP. You could build it a lot cheaper by using recycled windows & door and milling your own timber. Price is very variable, if you want to build cheaper you can do it. I went for strength & quality and paid a bit more.

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