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  • andrew.mead.1253 commented on MiiBooth's instructable Ocean Waves in a bottle (Video)1 year ago
    Ocean Waves in a bottle (Video)

    "All that glitters is not Gold". Sometimes it's a glittery, interactive ocean wave simulator. You are a wise-man.Thank-you!

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  • Illuminate Lightbulbs Wirelessly: DIY Slayer Exciter

    I recall stories in the 1970's of TV station technicians servicing transmitter equipment at the base of their broadcast tower at night, using standard 4ft long fluorescent tubes (nothing else) for wireless lighting.

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  • How to "Fly" a Human Powered Hydrofoil - the "Aquaskipper"

    But there are two types of Neoprene. Open cell Neoprene sheet is composed of intercommunicating "bubbles" of Neoprene allowing passage of water, air etc., Closed cell Neoprene sheet is composed of whole and independent Neoprene bubbles that do not permit the passage of water. It alone is impermeable and therefore-"waterproof".

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  • Quick and easy book safe/geocache container

    The Hymn Society of America's shall hear about this! Harrumph!!

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  • IBC above ground plunge pool

    Ok--I'll bite. What's a 1000 litre IBC? An inside barrel cart? An Ice brick cube?

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  • Master a perfect inline wire splice everytime

    While working on a pipe organ restoration project in the 1980's I was warned by my partner ( a former news-wire teletype service technician) to always splice wires in the described manner, though not necessarily as described. Both bared portions of the wired ends should be the same length; lay the middle of one bared end wire atop the middle of the other bared end portion of the other wire to form an "X" with both ends pointing up; then, twist them together using the thumbs and index fingers of both hands while trying to have an equal number of well spaced twists of wire on each side of the middle of the joint. Try to fold-in the ends of the wire splice into the over all splice to reduce the space occupied by the splice--even if there's no space restrictions. It's good practic...

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    While working on a pipe organ restoration project in the 1980's I was warned by my partner ( a former news-wire teletype service technician) to always splice wires in the described manner, though not necessarily as described. Both bared portions of the wired ends should be the same length; lay the middle of one bared end wire atop the middle of the other bared end portion of the other wire to form an "X" with both ends pointing up; then, twist them together using the thumbs and index fingers of both hands while trying to have an equal number of well spaced twists of wire on each side of the middle of the joint. Try to fold-in the ends of the wire splice into the over all splice to reduce the space occupied by the splice--even if there's no space restrictions. It's good practice to never resort to poor technique in the execution of ones job or role in life. It would seem very strange for me to ever connect two wires via the abhorrent pig-tail method. Much of the communication wire service technology basic practices and tools were developed during the US civil war (the 2nd one between 1861-65; the technology didn't exist at all during the first US civil war;...aka "the American Revolution") when "lines of communication" were hastily installed between advancing armies and their headquarters by corps of linesmen outfitted and tooled to climb trees or just about anything semi-solid 20 feet above ground and attach simple insulated wires for carrying telegraphed messages and intelligence. These wires were prone to break by accident and were vulnerable to intentional damage by covert enemies operating behind lines. The linesmen had to make fast but effective repairs as the outcome of battles could easily depend on whether intelligence arrived at an intended destination point via an intact conductive line--this is why some technicians get freaked-out if they see someone use a pig-tail splice in a line--their teachers, were taught by earlier teaches all the way back to as early as the 1840's. Don't forget the first trans-Atlantic submarine cable was lain in 1853 and inside that 2000 mile long cable there would have been tens-of thousands of splices that would have been made under the most intense scrutiny and standards imaginable. The cable quickly failed ( a short section of this sable is on display at the Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa, Canada (I think it's called that). What a thrill it was to discover and see a portion of that cable--I had wondered what it looked like for decades after reading about its laying by what had been the worlds largest passenger ship-that's another great story--.And for heavens sake---use rosin-core solder for soldering wires and electric work on the job. I can hardly believe this has yet to be mentioned.

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  • Make 4 Useful Things From 9V Dead Battery

    A 5th use is of course a paper-weight. The standard 9 volt "transistor" battery is well suited to this task having nicely rounded edges that will not damage paper.The 6th use is for the positive terminal on another dead 9 volt battery. It can be used to contain and store minute quantities of water--perhaps as a water bowl for one's pet cricket.

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