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  • bandcoach commented on AndreyT's instructable DIY AUX Splitter 3 months ago
    DIY AUX Splitter

    Unfortunately this project suffers from a basic flaw - the implementation means that any set of headphones can load the other set(s) and therefore introduce distortion to all sets. This is because different makes of headphones have different impedances which the output device (phone, amplifier, etc.) sees as a variable load and so ends up providing variable output power which one moment can be too much and the next not enough to drive the different headphones.Even the same make and model of headphones can have variations in their specifications - all specifications are nominal i.e. expected with a tolerance of +/-5% usually.Decades ago now (1987) I built a few variations on a splitter box based on circuits published in various audio magazines and audio textbooks - the best one had each ...see more »Unfortunately this project suffers from a basic flaw - the implementation means that any set of headphones can load the other set(s) and therefore introduce distortion to all sets. This is because different makes of headphones have different impedances which the output device (phone, amplifier, etc.) sees as a variable load and so ends up providing variable output power which one moment can be too much and the next not enough to drive the different headphones.Even the same make and model of headphones can have variations in their specifications - all specifications are nominal i.e. expected with a tolerance of +/-5% usually.Decades ago now (1987) I built a few variations on a splitter box based on circuits published in various audio magazines and audio textbooks - the best one had each socket loaded with a 33ohm resistor on each leg containing audio (i.e. the left and right channels for each socket but not the ground line for what is hoped are obvious reasons). All resistors were matched to within 0.5% (i.e. +/-0.165ohms) What this did was ensured that the load seen by the driving device (amplifier, phone, etc.) was constant at all points in the circuit; variations in the impedance of individual headsets became a non-event.

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  • bandcoach commented on Magnelectrostatic's instructable Headphone Splitter3 months ago
    Headphone Splitter

    Unfortunately this project suffers from a basic flaw - the implementation means that any set of headphones can load the other set(s) and therefore introduce distortion to all sets. This is because different makes of headphones have different impedances which the output device (phone, amplifier, etc.) sees as a variable load and so ends up providing variable output power which one moment can be too much and the next not enough to drive the different headphones.Even the same make and model of headphones can have variations in their specifications - all specifications are nominal i.e. expected with a tolerance of +/-5% usually.Decades ago now (1987) I built a few variations on a splitter box based on circuits published in various audio magazines and audio textbooks - the best one had each ...see more »Unfortunately this project suffers from a basic flaw - the implementation means that any set of headphones can load the other set(s) and therefore introduce distortion to all sets. This is because different makes of headphones have different impedances which the output device (phone, amplifier, etc.) sees as a variable load and so ends up providing variable output power which one moment can be too much and the next not enough to drive the different headphones.Even the same make and model of headphones can have variations in their specifications - all specifications are nominal i.e. expected with a tolerance of +/-5% usually.Decades ago now (1987) I built a few variations on a splitter box based on circuits published in various audio magazines and audio textbooks - the best one had each socket loaded with a 33ohm resistor on each leg containing audio (i.e. the left and right channels for each socket but not the ground line for what is hoped are obvious reasons). All resistors were matched to within 0.5% (i.e. +/-0.165ohms) What this did was ensured that the load seen by the driving device (amplifier, phone, etc.) was constant at all points in the circuit; variations in the impedance of individual headsets became a non-event.

    View Instructable »