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  • Create a rechargable 2 volt Aluminum/Titanium Ion Battery

    Wow, great idea! Lately I've been playing with the alkaline chemistry (this battery can be considered "acidic", but that's a great idea. See my other battery ( https://www.instructables.com/id/Junk-Battery-265v-Rechargable-Aluminum-Ion/ ) for more information. At some point I think it will be possible to combine what I've learned on both batteries for the final chemistry.

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  • Junk Battery - 2.65v Rechargable Aluminum-Ion

    Stay away from Lead, just buy them. They're messy and dangerous to create, and the factories do a much better job of keeping things environmentally friendly than you can at home.One hint I can give you is Nickel Foam and potassium hydroxide. You can find nickel foam online, OR you can plate nickel on iron. If you made a nickel and iron cell, filled it with water, and drained it, it will make the oxides you need - no need to buy powder. Plating is even better than foam, because the active layer is very very thin on the surface - so you could nickel plate steel wool and have it work. Be careful with your plating solutions when done. Potassium hydroxide and water is the electrolyte.I think within a few years I'll be production ready.. just gotta make that leap.

    "Pourbaix diagrams" get you in the neighborhood, they tell you what chemical is formed at what pH for a given voltage - in aqueous solutions. This will tell you what is happening on the +/- sides of a battery (generally). BUT much of what is available online really doesn't help in the construction of a useful battery - the crappiest battery you might buy is going to be waaaay better than any you can build. I'm working towards one, but it's definitely not going to give you 400 watts. My record is something like 3 watt hours. It's been 4 years, and I can barely keep a white LED running all night. But don't let that stop you. Start small with copper/zinc or copper/magnesium and work your way up and learn the chemistry - that's literally what I've been doing. In an emergenc...see more »"Pourbaix diagrams" get you in the neighborhood, they tell you what chemical is formed at what pH for a given voltage - in aqueous solutions. This will tell you what is happening on the +/- sides of a battery (generally). BUT much of what is available online really doesn't help in the construction of a useful battery - the crappiest battery you might buy is going to be waaaay better than any you can build. I'm working towards one, but it's definitely not going to give you 400 watts. My record is something like 3 watt hours. It's been 4 years, and I can barely keep a white LED running all night. But don't let that stop you. Start small with copper/zinc or copper/magnesium and work your way up and learn the chemistry - that's literally what I've been doing. In an emergency, this could be used to recharge a cell phone - VERY slowly.for an off-grid setup:Solar panel, charge controller, 12v lead acid batteries, inverter : something like https://www.amazon.com/WindyNation-Complete-VertaM...Edison cells will give you some leeway for discharging, they can go much deeper before they are considered "discharged".24v will give you a much more robust system (2X12v in series, then all in parallel).

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  • Create a rechargable 2 volt Aluminum/Titanium Ion Battery

    Lots!I haven't returned to this acid/DES chemistry in a while, but I've been heading off in another direction with a completely different instructable doing something similar with alkaline/silicates:https://www.instructables.com/id/Junk-Battery-265v-...I may circle back to this, however, with everything I've learned since then.Most recently, I've been adding aluminum sulfates to the mix for some interesting results. Watch my progress on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Big-Attic-House-147402252...

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    • Junk Battery - 2.65v Rechargable Aluminum-Ion
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  • Junk Battery - 2.65v Rechargable Aluminum-Ion

    You might take a look at the copper version (the last step).. you can then alternate layers of aluminum and copper to make something with ridiculous capacity... just make sure all the copper layers are connected to each other for your cathode (+) and the aluminum to each other for your anode (-). You overall voltage will be lower, but closer to AA-style voltages (1.3 or so). Starting with oxidized copper in the build will also help shorten conditioning time.I just started building such a stack today, 5 interwoven layers of copper and aluminum. I have the graphite, but I realize that graphite sheets or solid electrodes just might not be readily accessible for many people. I was able to buy a 10' section of aluminum flashing ($6) and 10' of copper ($34) at my local hardware store.

    True, except he should be getting a much higher voltage with magnesium than he does. I haven't looked into magnesium yet - but using this technique he should be closer to 3.5-4 volts with Mg. I don't know about rechargability with MG either - once it becomes MgO, it might just stay there - giving you a "one way trip"I'm able to get 1.7 down to 1.2v with a similar chemistry (see the added end chapter) with copper on the anode with aluminum.Additionally, Aluminum is much easier to find as scrap than magnesium.

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  • Junk Battery - 2.65v Rechargable Aluminum-Ion

    My dad bought it in junior high from a friend who built it from the kit in something like 1957. Over the years he replaced most of the capacitors and a few resistors. I received it last year as a gift from him and had to replace a few bits of my own, works beautifully once it warms up. As a reward for repairing it, he got me a brand new oscilloscope that sits next to it, and we've taken bets on which one will still be operable in another 60 years.

    My dad bought it in junior high (~1957) from a friend who built it from the kit a year or two before. Over the years he replaced most of the capacitors and a few resistors. I received it last year as a gift from him and had to replace a few bits of my own, works beautifully once it warms up. As a reward for repairing it, he got me a brand new oscilloscope that sits next to it, and we've taken bets on which one will still be operable in another 60 years.

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  • Create a rechargable 2 volt Aluminum/Titanium Ion Battery

    Essentially what I have for the graphite. I was documenting what I had on hand.. plus, you have to have a battery on hand (hopefully dead) to destroy to do that. Additionally, I wanted to make sure the residual MnO2 in the graphite wouldn't give me a false reading.But yes, you could totally use a lantern battery.

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