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1Instructables8,875Views12CommentsConcord, CAJoined June 22nd, 2016
I'm a maker, programmer, and designer. I love music, games, and simple design. I'm looking for work!
  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    That's probably because you haven't configured your router to pass http requests to your IP address on to the raspberry pi. I recommend using port 80 with sudo privileges when you're ready to interface with it. You'll need to look up a guide for the type of router you own for this part.You definitely should also remove your IP address from your comment.

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    That will be an easy fix. The raspberry pi doesn't have a copy of the saveState.json file, because I disabled git tracking for it. It gets annoying when normal app functioning creates changes to the app. In retrospect, I should have used a default state to start the app, but it's easy enough to copy the file over.Copy the text from your computer's saveState. Run `touch saveState.json` in the root directory of your raspberry pi app and paste the contents in. That should do it for you!

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    Ah, that's because Google Assistant will be the trigger. The Maker web request is the IFTTT action.

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    It is trying to read your password and port from a hidden .env file that you will need to create. Run `touch .env` in the root of the project. In that file, you'll need a port and password with syntax like this: PORT=80PASSWORD=password_hereI didn't want to share my info up on GitHub, and I figured you wouldn't either!

    So, the problem there is that you are making a GET request to the API, which is telling you the state of the sample switch. You'll need to make a POST request to the server in order to affect the state. A great tool for this is https://www.getpostman.com/.

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    It sounds like Apache is hijacking port 80. You'll need to disable the Apache server with something like 'sudo service stop Apache' and then you'll be able to to run the Node.js server with 'sudo node app.js'.Also, if you haven't yet, make sure to run 'npm install' in the console so that the package manager can pull in the additional resources that I aren't part of the bundle. You'll need those before Node will be able to execute my starter code. Let me know if that helps!

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  • call_me_kyle's instructable Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip's weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip
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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    I've just released a starter application that requires you to use a password query string in the URL. It's not the most secure method, but it should keep your friends from messing with you.https://github.com/krpeacock/google_home_starter

    I've just set up a starter application for you to use. Let me know if you have any issues setting it up! https://github.com/krpeacock/google_home_starter

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    I'm going to build the new project over the weekend. I'll reply here with it once it's ready, and I'll update the Instructable to point to it. Also, for my benefit, do you think you'll need more details on the electronics portion, or are you mainly concerned about the Node.js environment?

    Great! I'll let you know when I've got something for you to use.

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    This is an intermediary step. Since you have the ability to edit the body of the post request on IFTTT, you can readily attach some private key or JWT to your request. Hopefully, I'll get that next step running as part of my starter code, and then I'll share my authentication solution with everyone!As for a local solution, you can check out this https://timleland.com/wireless-power-outlets/ implementation. There is a project that imitates a Phillips Hue Bridge, which can be accessed on local wifi. Unfortunately, those protocols limit you to On/Off and "dimming" features.My approach has the benefit of being accessible through browser, phone widgets, and voice control, as long as you set up those features. Since the server's API can handle whatever requests you can dream up, it ...

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    This is an intermediary step. Since you have the ability to edit the body of the post request on IFTTT, you can readily attach some private key or JWT to your request. Hopefully, I'll get that next step running as part of my starter code, and then I'll share my authentication solution with everyone!As for a local solution, you can check out this https://timleland.com/wireless-power-outlets/ implementation. There is a project that imitates a Phillips Hue Bridge, which can be accessed on local wifi. Unfortunately, those protocols limit you to On/Off and "dimming" features.My approach has the benefit of being accessible through browser, phone widgets, and voice control, as long as you set up those features. Since the server's API can handle whatever requests you can dream up, it leaves room for scheduling events, affecting multiple devices, and so on.

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  • Google Home + Raspberry Pi Power Strip

    Thanks! I use the strip at my nightstand along with a couple Phillips Hue bulbs around the apartment for the full "smart home" experience

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