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  • How to Make Game Changing Nutella Stuffed Chocolate Cookies

    Nuts! --that is, one kid in the extended family is allergic to nuts, so I can't make these for Christmas dinner. There's no real substitute for Nutella, but I could stuff a marked batch with chocolate and -- what? Marshmallow? Caramel? Any suggestions welcome.

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  • cbowers18 commented on a-morpheus's instructable Undead Pan3 months ago
    Undead Pan

    A fine restoration job. A couple of comments: it's best to use edible cooking oil with a high smoke point. You say you used "organic, cold-pressed" linseed oil, which sounds like the edible oil known in cooking as flaxseed oil. That's an excellent choice, but ordinary linseed oil, the kind used in painting etc, is not. A chart of edible oils with their smoke points is at https://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthies...And: now that your pan is restored, do NOT scour it or wash it aggressively; and no dishwasher! The oil which you have carefully polymerized not only onto but into the surface will make this pan nonstick, and a light wiping with soapy water should get it clean; ordinary dish soap will not destroy the polymerized coating. Each successive use will add to the c...

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    A fine restoration job. A couple of comments: it's best to use edible cooking oil with a high smoke point. You say you used "organic, cold-pressed" linseed oil, which sounds like the edible oil known in cooking as flaxseed oil. That's an excellent choice, but ordinary linseed oil, the kind used in painting etc, is not. A chart of edible oils with their smoke points is at https://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthies...And: now that your pan is restored, do NOT scour it or wash it aggressively; and no dishwasher! The oil which you have carefully polymerized not only onto but into the surface will make this pan nonstick, and a light wiping with soapy water should get it clean; ordinary dish soap will not destroy the polymerized coating. Each successive use will add to the coating; you have created an heirloom for many years to come. Enjoy the fruits of your labor.

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  • cbowers18 commented on evanandkatelyn's instructable Wood Keychain Quick Connects4 months ago
    Wood Keychain Quick Connects

    Have to be careful with neodymium magnets though; when a disconnect is separated, the loose halves will stick to anything ferrous within reach, and that reach is considerable. Imagine dropping your keys, and having them stick to some inaccessible spot, like a car underbody. Or just picking up any ferrous shmertz from the ground. And what is the other separated half doing in the meantime? Also not safe near magnetic strips on cards, or any magnetic media.

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  • cbowers18 commented on Gabriel5's instructable How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking8 months ago
    How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking

    Stefan, it appears that your Karrimat is what in the US is known as Ensolite; Ensolite pads have been in use here since the 1950s. (Thin sheets of Ensolite cut into a doughnut shape are used in winter atop outdoor latrine seats, to keep the user from sticking to the seat in -20 C. conditions.) But there are more advanced sleeping pads on the market; look up Thermarest. And my frame backpack is different from what we know as a rucksack; look up Kelty, or just the generic "frame backpack." The main use of the stuffsack for my 3-season sleeping bag, warm to -10 F., is to compress it into a cylinder 8" x 15"; the waterproofing is an added plus. (My winter bag is warm to -30 F., and has a larger stuffsack.You might enjoy reading "Backpacking: One Step at a Time,"...

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    Stefan, it appears that your Karrimat is what in the US is known as Ensolite; Ensolite pads have been in use here since the 1950s. (Thin sheets of Ensolite cut into a doughnut shape are used in winter atop outdoor latrine seats, to keep the user from sticking to the seat in -20 C. conditions.) But there are more advanced sleeping pads on the market; look up Thermarest. And my frame backpack is different from what we know as a rucksack; look up Kelty, or just the generic "frame backpack." The main use of the stuffsack for my 3-season sleeping bag, warm to -10 F., is to compress it into a cylinder 8" x 15"; the waterproofing is an added plus. (My winter bag is warm to -30 F., and has a larger stuffsack.You might enjoy reading "Backpacking: One Step at a Time," by Colin Fletcher.

    Stefan, I'm not sure what kind of equipment you have. The top flap of my pack has two straps attached on top; my sleeping bag, pad, and tent are strapped to the flap, and whenever I open the pack they flip forward out of the way without any handling or fuss. My bag, pad, and tents all have their own waterproof stuff sacks; no need for sheets of plastic, which tear, blow in wind, and end up in the environment. If you read carefully what I said about food and water, you would not use the word "heavy." And I don't know what you mean by a "lightweight, bulky" mattress, but for long trips, bulk is even more important thatn weight; if you can't fit something into your pack, its weight doesn't matter. But I certainly don't carry either a (heavy) air mattress or a large squi...

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    Stefan, I'm not sure what kind of equipment you have. The top flap of my pack has two straps attached on top; my sleeping bag, pad, and tent are strapped to the flap, and whenever I open the pack they flip forward out of the way without any handling or fuss. My bag, pad, and tents all have their own waterproof stuff sacks; no need for sheets of plastic, which tear, blow in wind, and end up in the environment. If you read carefully what I said about food and water, you would not use the word "heavy." And I don't know what you mean by a "lightweight, bulky" mattress, but for long trips, bulk is even more important thatn weight; if you can't fit something into your pack, its weight doesn't matter. But I certainly don't carry either a (heavy) air mattress or a large squishy foam pad.

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  • cbowers18 commented on Gabriel5's instructable How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking9 months ago
    How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking

    This was a trip on the southern portion of the Appalachian Trail. There are reliable water sources along the way (even if you have to walk half a mile down a side trail to reach them), identified in any of the numerous guide books to the Trail. I tried to keep a canteen ready on my belt, and a spare quart in my pack. I used freeze-dried food, which is compact, lightweight, and expensive (!); an occasional treat like canned sardines to break the monotony. I resupplied twice by picking up packages I mailed to myself at post offices in towns through which the Trail runs. This is standard practice for long-distance Trail hikers, and the post offices along the Trail cooperate.If warm and fair weather could be guaranteed, I could probably have gone the whole trip without resupply, taking lots...

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    This was a trip on the southern portion of the Appalachian Trail. There are reliable water sources along the way (even if you have to walk half a mile down a side trail to reach them), identified in any of the numerous guide books to the Trail. I tried to keep a canteen ready on my belt, and a spare quart in my pack. I used freeze-dried food, which is compact, lightweight, and expensive (!); an occasional treat like canned sardines to break the monotony. I resupplied twice by picking up packages I mailed to myself at post offices in towns through which the Trail runs. This is standard practice for long-distance Trail hikers, and the post offices along the Trail cooperate.If warm and fair weather could be guaranteed, I could probably have gone the whole trip without resupply, taking lots of freeze-dried food.

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  • cbowers18 commented on Gabriel5's instructable How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking9 months ago
    How to Pack a Backpack for Hiking

    There are two things wrong with putting your sleeping bag at the bottom of your pack. First, it implies that every night you have to take everything else out to get to the bag, and then totally repack every morning. Second, there are no clean dry pavements, handy benches, or wall hooks out in the woods to set your pack on; having the sleeping bag at the bottom exposes it to dirt and moisture every time you stop to rest (unless you never take your pack off). Moisture is the worst; you can sleep in a dirty bag, but not a wet one. And the pack bottom doesn't exist that never develops pinholes and wear spots.My bag, along with my sleeping pad, is strapped to the top flap of my pack. Always available, never in the way, high and dry. My longest backpacking trip, living solely out of my pack, ...

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    There are two things wrong with putting your sleeping bag at the bottom of your pack. First, it implies that every night you have to take everything else out to get to the bag, and then totally repack every morning. Second, there are no clean dry pavements, handy benches, or wall hooks out in the woods to set your pack on; having the sleeping bag at the bottom exposes it to dirt and moisture every time you stop to rest (unless you never take your pack off). Moisture is the worst; you can sleep in a dirty bag, but not a wet one. And the pack bottom doesn't exist that never develops pinholes and wear spots.My bag, along with my sleeping pad, is strapped to the top flap of my pack. Always available, never in the way, high and dry. My longest backpacking trip, living solely out of my pack, was 35 days.

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  • cbowers18 commented on Itsatrav's instructable Hex Nut D61 year ago
    Hex Nut D6

    Not only are the spots called pips, "dice" is plural; the singular is "die." You have made one die.Since there is slightly more weight on the "one" face than any other, and slightly less weight on the "six" face (one drillout vs. six), this die will tend to roll a six slightly more often than any other number. "Professional" dice, those used in casinos, are machined to exacting tolerances, taking into account even the weight of the paint in the pips, so that each face has an equal chance of turning up.A common way of making crooked dice is to drill out the pips on the "six" face, insert small lead pellets in the holes, and then paint over them; hence the term "loaded dice." A die so loaded will tend to land with the l...

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    Not only are the spots called pips, "dice" is plural; the singular is "die." You have made one die.Since there is slightly more weight on the "one" face than any other, and slightly less weight on the "six" face (one drillout vs. six), this die will tend to roll a six slightly more often than any other number. "Professional" dice, those used in casinos, are machined to exacting tolerances, taking into account even the weight of the paint in the pips, so that each face has an equal chance of turning up.A common way of making crooked dice is to drill out the pips on the "six" face, insert small lead pellets in the holes, and then paint over them; hence the term "loaded dice." A die so loaded will tend to land with the loaded face down, and the opposite face (in this example, "one") up. That's why casino dice are transparent, to make loads visible. Don't try this at home; even a Presbyterian minister (me) knows about this and other ways to make crooked dice.

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  • cbowers18 commented on seamster's instructable Golf Ball Puzzle1 year ago
    Golf Ball Puzzle

    I haven't tried this yet, but to reduce bubbles, perhaps a few drops of dish soap in the water, to break surface tension?

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  • cbowers18 commented on Shenzhen's instructable Carbon tape heated steering wheel1 year ago
    Carbon tape heated steering wheel

    A nice idea. Unfortunately, disassembling a steering wheel containing an airbag is NOT recommended for amateurs! There is an explosive charge in there. At best, you run the risk of making the airbag inoperable. At worst . . . The steering wheel you show must be from a very old car; all US cars have had airbags in the steering wheel for a quarter century.

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  • How to Solder a Proper Plumbing Connection

    Good work, ShadowRoch. It's especially impressive that when others offered suggestions or corrections, you didn't adopt the attitude of "I already know it all." I have three graduate degrees in two different fields, and I don't "know it all" about either of them, far from it.I have one comment; the last picture shows you kneeling by your work; I assume the picture was posed to serve as a conclusion. But you're posing without the safety glasses you quite correctly recommend. You should be shown doing what you say. That said, I look forward to your next Instructable!

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  • cbowers18 commented on ben maisel's instructable Backpacking Tips and Tricks1 year ago
    Backpacking Tips and Tricks

    Thru-hiking in 1972, I holed up in a lean-to for 36 hours (2 nights) while Hurricane Agnes blew through. Nice to have a book to read while the rain poured down. Also in the evenings after dinner, unless all you're going to do is hike and sleep. And a spiral notebok and pencil (large notebook, 2 pencils) to record thoughts, write poetry, save names/addresses of people you befriend along your way.

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  • cbowers18 commented on SpecificLove's instructable 8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool1 year ago
    8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool

    Yes, such as the ones sold in supermarkets-- two grades, one (green) for scouring pots, one (blue) for scouring non-stick cookware. Neither will scratch glass, although the green one will scratch the paint finish on your refrigerator. But I suppose that someone looking to replace steel wool would go to a hardware store, not a supermarket. As you point out, the greenies sold in hardware stores are designed to function like sandpaper.

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  • cbowers18 commented on SpecificLove's instructable 8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool1 year ago
    8 Life Hacks With Steel Wool

    Interesting ideas. But tell me-- have you ever tried to bathe a cat?

    For those who are worried about scratching their windshield with 0000 steel wool, try a green plastic scrubbie (Scotch or generic); they're good at scouring all sorts of things, but they're softer than glass, so shouldn't scratch.I wonder about the person who reported that 0000 scratched the glass of their aquarium; was it glass, or plexy or Lexan? Those will scratch for sure.

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  • DIY shelf above the stove = extra storage in a small kitchen

    Storing herbs and spices above the stove exposes them to heat and moisture, which will considerably shorten their shelf life. Light is also the enemy of herbs and spices. Bettter to store them in a cabinet away from the stove, and use your clever shelf for other things you want to have handy when cooking.

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  • cbowers18 commented on agentjohnson's instructable How to Plug a Tire1 year ago
    How to Plug a Tire

    I second BobB25's warning. A tire plug is not only meant to be temporary. It IS temporary, in the real sense that it won't last long. Plugging a tire can also throw off the tire's balance, meaning accelerated wear of the tire and the steering and suspension. Having a tire properly repaired and rebalanced-- dynamic balanced-- is much cheaper than a new tire or a suspension fix. You can pay now, or pay later-- with money. A sudden tire failure can also make you pay with your life.

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  •  Unusual Life Hacks Of Super Strong Neodymium Magnet

    I second the caution about using these around food, or anywhere they might be ingested. In addition-- two larger ones, about the size of quarters, are strong enough to pinch flesh between them and produce painful blood blisters on arms or fingers; and-- using them in any non-fixed location, such as a snack bag or as paperclips, invites any other ferrous items anywhere near to stick to them-- they can exert a pull from inches away. Imagine your magnetic "paperclip" with regular paperclips, staples, keyrings, and so forth clinging to it; and don't dare let it near the magnetic strip on a credit card.

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