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  • ccclarke commented on gizmologist's instructable Splice Cable Like A Rocket Scientist4 months ago
    Splice Cable Like A Rocket Scientist

    To learn more about how NASA requirements for inline stranded wire splicing, Google "NASA-STD 8739.4A" and check out pages 67-69.CC

    To learn how NASA (inline) splices stranded wire, Google NASA-STD 8739.4A and check out pages 67-69.CC

    To learn more about NASA requirements for inline, stranded wire splicing, Google "NASA-STD-8739.4A" and check out pages 67-69.CC Clarke IPC CIT

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  • ccclarke commented on gizmologist's instructable Splice Cable Like A Rocket Scientist4 months ago
    Splice Cable Like A Rocket Scientist

    I train and certify NASA-level solder operators. Unless you can supply current source documentation to prove otherwise, I'm sorry, but this isn't the way NASA splices wires. Twisting conductors like this (called a lineman's splice) weakens the wire, though it does offer a good mechanical joint to constrain the wires prior to solder application. The generally accepted method of two-wire, similar gage splicing uses lap joints, where the opposing conductors are placed end to end against each other, with the insulation one to two wire diameters from the end of the opposite wire conductor. With the proper amount of flux and solder, the (undisturbed) lay of the wire strands should be barely discernable. Add some polyolefin heat shrink, and you've got a solder joint that will survive envir...see more »I train and certify NASA-level solder operators. Unless you can supply current source documentation to prove otherwise, I'm sorry, but this isn't the way NASA splices wires. Twisting conductors like this (called a lineman's splice) weakens the wire, though it does offer a good mechanical joint to constrain the wires prior to solder application. The generally accepted method of two-wire, similar gage splicing uses lap joints, where the opposing conductors are placed end to end against each other, with the insulation one to two wire diameters from the end of the opposite wire conductor. With the proper amount of flux and solder, the (undisturbed) lay of the wire strands should be barely discernable. Add some polyolefin heat shrink, and you've got a solder joint that will survive environmental testing and extended duration spaceflight.CC Clarke IPC CIT

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