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  • Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin

    My apologies, then, for not reading fully!

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  • Water Saving Toilet-Mounted Basin

    Given the way a standard toilet is designed to flush and re-fill. this solution would not save/re-use any water - though it would add grey water to the water used to flush your toilet.If you look into the toilet tank, you will find float mechanism that controls the fill valve for the toilet so that the incoming water shuts off once the tank has been filled to the proper level.If you were to over ride this float (hold it down, for instance), the water would continue to flow into the tank. At some point the water level would rise above the elevated drain tube designed to prevent over-filling should the float valve fail.Thus, after you flush your toilet, the tank is automatically re-filled. If you were to use this basin, the water running down its drain would fill the tank a bit more than...

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    Given the way a standard toilet is designed to flush and re-fill. this solution would not save/re-use any water - though it would add grey water to the water used to flush your toilet.If you look into the toilet tank, you will find float mechanism that controls the fill valve for the toilet so that the incoming water shuts off once the tank has been filled to the proper level.If you were to over ride this float (hold it down, for instance), the water would continue to flow into the tank. At some point the water level would rise above the elevated drain tube designed to prevent over-filling should the float valve fail.Thus, after you flush your toilet, the tank is automatically re-filled. If you were to use this basin, the water running down its drain would fill the tank a bit more than the level set, then run down the overflow tube into the toilet and out the toilet drain.Another short-coming is the implicit requirement that one use this toilet-mounted sink to wash their hands and brush their teeth. While, I suppose, not necessarily unsanitary - definitely less than appealing.Although, as my wife reminds me, they use a similar combination fixture (usually out of stainless steel) in many prisons.

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  • Spiral Cut a Wooden Dowel Using a Table Saw

    SEARS sold a CRAFTSMAN ROUTER CRAFTER MODEL 720:25250 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ7NYL0HnsQ that you may find on Craigslist for less than fifty dollars.It is designed for using a router to cut the grooves - worth it if you're wanting to make more than one such piece oar need to make 'duplicates.'This, however was a good instructable. Might also try using a Dado Blade if the wider groove was intended.Also thought that, were the wood dowel's OD close to the ID of a PVC pipe (or fittings) the rest could be designed to allow the dowel to be held in place inside a section of PVC pipe.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Router Planer15 days ago
    Router Planer

    I thought that 'flooding' the work piece with an epoxy resin, letting it fully cure and then using this router approach might keep the pieces in place during planing and provide a filler in the process so that the finished project had no gaps between individual pieces of wood/branches, etc. After planing, another coating could be applied to 'finish' the surface nicely - perhaps a poly urethane.

    I noticed the router base was made of three-ply. If you added some one by support strips to the top of each edge they would stiffen the base without interfering with the process. I suspect pressure on the router would tend to lower the bit in the center of each pass if the base were to 'flex.' You might also look to Birch Plywood as it is built with many layers and is less likely to flex.Then, mount your Belt Sander on a similar sled to finish the job! (Hmmm, how to do that!!??)

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on tomatoskins's instructable 20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools15 days ago
    20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools

    Harbor Freight Tools has them.8 Pc Bolstered Screwdriver Set (hex at end of handle). Mayhew Select 66306 Cats Paw Screwdriver Set, 10-Piece (Amazon) More Money Hex on Shank. See GRIP http://gripontools.net/product/grip-grand-rapids-industrial-63072-go-thru-hex-bolster-screwdriver-set-8-piece/ However, adding a six-inch wrench for extra torque may simply help destroy a cheap Phillips Head screw quicker. It might serve for someone with a limp wrist to reach the torque required to set a screw in place, To release a 'frozen' Slotted or Phillips Head screw, the extra torque may prove more harmful than helpful. One of those hand-held Impact Drivers might be better as it keeps the bit into the screw head as the force is applied to the screw head. Usually, it just takes a little bit of turnin...

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    Harbor Freight Tools has them.8 Pc Bolstered Screwdriver Set (hex at end of handle). Mayhew Select 66306 Cats Paw Screwdriver Set, 10-Piece (Amazon) More Money Hex on Shank. See GRIP http://gripontools.net/product/grip-grand-rapids-industrial-63072-go-thru-hex-bolster-screwdriver-set-8-piece/ However, adding a six-inch wrench for extra torque may simply help destroy a cheap Phillips Head screw quicker. It might serve for someone with a limp wrist to reach the torque required to set a screw in place, To release a 'frozen' Slotted or Phillips Head screw, the extra torque may prove more harmful than helpful. One of those hand-held Impact Drivers might be better as it keeps the bit into the screw head as the force is applied to the screw head. Usually, it just takes a little bit of turning to 'break' the screw (or bolt) free. If in metal (Machine Screw), WD-40 and similar products should be applied before attempting to free a frozen screw. Heat helps as well. Brute force applied to a frozen screw is as likely to destroy the screw head as release the screw - then, you'll need another tool!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on yuriysklyar's instructable Bunk Bed With No Screws19 days ago
    Bunk Bed With No Screws

    Are you thinking of a wedged tenon approach?

    "Better Homes and Gardens Leighton Twin Over Twin Wood Bunk Bed, Mu ... Walmart $179 "I got our last one from Big Lots. Apparently, they no longer carry that model. I recall it was about $180 before tax and w/o mattresses. Apparently prices in CA are higher and inflation has hit the Bunk Bed market!

    If the tenons on the side pieces were split in the middle of the long dimension and the receiving 'mortise' through the end panels were cut (like a dove tail - narrow in the inside and wide on the outside) the sides could be fitted snugly and then secured by inserting the long wedge into the slot.In the image I found, two wedges were employed horizontally. If you imagine a single wedge inserted vertically you'll get a 'picture' of what I attempted to describe above.Easier written, I suppose, than programmed into a machine!I assume that, if I had access to a CNC machine, I could cut the through mortises precisely so the wedged side was so many sixteenths wider than the other side with the required angle such that, once the wedge was driven in, the side panel wold break before the tenon p...

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    If the tenons on the side pieces were split in the middle of the long dimension and the receiving 'mortise' through the end panels were cut (like a dove tail - narrow in the inside and wide on the outside) the sides could be fitted snugly and then secured by inserting the long wedge into the slot.In the image I found, two wedges were employed horizontally. If you imagine a single wedge inserted vertically you'll get a 'picture' of what I attempted to describe above.Easier written, I suppose, than programmed into a machine!I assume that, if I had access to a CNC machine, I could cut the through mortises precisely so the wedged side was so many sixteenths wider than the other side with the required angle such that, once the wedge was driven in, the side panel wold break before the tenon pulled loose

    OK, I see what you were suggesting.I was thinking that the CNC machine could cut tapered slots for the side rails - maybe 2-4 degrees) - and the tenons on the rail ends could be slotted to accept a wedge that would lock the tenon into the side piece.Disassembly would not be as easy or 'tool less,' of course. Getting the wedge out - well, that would require skill and patience. Then again, I've had a couple Bunk Beds in my time. I bought them, assembled them, sold them and watched the buyers take them apart and home!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on JON-A-TRON's instructable Flip-Top CNC Table4 weeks ago
    Flip-Top CNC Table

    That was my first thought. Admittedly, I've no access to a CNC Machine capable of handling a 4x8 sheet of plywood - thought eh Baltic Birch comes five foot wide (&sq) as I recall. I was thinking that, if the depth of the surface was equal or less than the height of the table structure, a simple panel could be used for the top (perhaps a torsion box panel to keep it light and strong) such that it stored in a track behind the table. And, if one were to insist upon something complex and creative, the CNC support might be designed to rise up when in use and lower itself when a simple bench top was needed.The problem with the machine/flat surface approach is the nature of a Flat Surface and their inevitable attraction to all things not otherwise fastened down in the shop.From my perspect...

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    That was my first thought. Admittedly, I've no access to a CNC Machine capable of handling a 4x8 sheet of plywood - thought eh Baltic Birch comes five foot wide (&sq) as I recall. I was thinking that, if the depth of the surface was equal or less than the height of the table structure, a simple panel could be used for the top (perhaps a torsion box panel to keep it light and strong) such that it stored in a track behind the table. And, if one were to insist upon something complex and creative, the CNC support might be designed to rise up when in use and lower itself when a simple bench top was needed.The problem with the machine/flat surface approach is the nature of a Flat Surface and their inevitable attraction to all things not otherwise fastened down in the shop.From my perspective, the investment in the CNC would demand it be protected as well as accessible (for tooling changes, adjustments, and such) at a comfortable level. In my case, it would likely prove to be the most expensive tool I ever bought for my shop and might warrant a room of it own ;)

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on GizmoGuy347's instructable Pellet Fed Rocket Stove5 weeks ago
    Pellet Fed Rocket Stove

    Impressive build. Thank you for sharing.I think you had better put a cover plate on that duplex outlet lest someone from the Canadian Fire Department sees this page and turns you in for maintaining an electrical fire hazard. ;)What is that can thing (w/?-mark)?Please show the 'chimney' - where does it go? (exit the room?)I did not find a video on this page. I, too, would like to see drawings and views of front, sides, back.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Born_to_build's instructable Adjustable Solar Panel Mount5 weeks ago
    Adjustable Solar Panel Mount

    I have a couple of old HFT Panels to install and appreciated hearing about the 'balance point' here. Essentially, reading your presentation and the comments got me off the dime!Lucky me - a neighbor has a 4" steel pole he dug up (concrete and all) which is mine for the taking - off to a great start!Thanks

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  • Tubing Roller-Bender From Scratch

    " It broke the first time I used it"I missed that bit - I suspect I was overly impressed by the half-inch stock chosen!I always save my receipts and have no hesitation to return any defective item - then, again, I've a HFT outlet close by. I returned some masking tape last week - exchange for a 'fresh roll' that came in different packaging. I suspect the stuff I bought was from another vendor and they'd had complaints about it - and, so, switched.I looked on You Tube and found several folks using the HFT device with varying levels of success - including two instances where they adapted a hand-held pipe threader to replace the 'ship's wheel' that comes with the tubing bender.and a hydraulic jack to eliminate the manual pressure screw!Given the device provides the basic geometry...

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    " It broke the first time I used it"I missed that bit - I suspect I was overly impressed by the half-inch stock chosen!I always save my receipts and have no hesitation to return any defective item - then, again, I've a HFT outlet close by. I returned some masking tape last week - exchange for a 'fresh roll' that came in different packaging. I suspect the stuff I bought was from another vendor and they'd had complaints about it - and, so, switched.I looked on You Tube and found several folks using the HFT device with varying levels of success - including two instances where they adapted a hand-held pipe threader to replace the 'ship's wheel' that comes with the tubing bender.and a hydraulic jack to eliminate the manual pressure screw!Given the device provides the basic geometry and a template, it would seem worth the money as a 'starter.' The dies were said to be less than ideal and 'packing sand' in the material was suggested in one instance (or two). Some initial 'slop' was removed with a washer, etc.If one is intent upon completing a one-off or a first project, it would seem to be worth trying one out - if returns wee but a short drive, of course.If, on the other hand, one is intent upon manufacturing - well, then the investment in a more robust and dependable solution would be justified.I was not taking 'a shot,' just offering a perspective from one absent your skills and equipment with no need to bend anything at the moment ;)

    Then, again, for the (less than the) price if the 1/2" aluminum plate, there is HFT.https://www.harborfreight.com/tubing-roller-99736....With a 25% Off coupon $135 Plus Tax, Or, if in a hurry, use the 20% off coupon and get one for $144 Plus Tax.

    Ten, again, for the (less than the) price if the 1/2" aluminum plate, there is HFT.https://www.harborfreight.com/tubing-roller-99736....With a 25% Off coupon $135 Plus Tax, Or, if in a hurry, use the 20% off coupon and get one for $144 Plus Tax.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Born_to_build's instructable Adjustable Solar Panel Mount5 weeks ago
    Adjustable Solar Panel Mount

    BTW, if you do this again, look for a steel tube for a mount! A bit tougher to drill into and such, but stronger, longer lasting than wood and less susceptible to most termites ;)If you find a section with and ID = the OD of the main mast, you can fashion a sleeve that will allow mounting the tilt mechanism such that it can be rotated about the main mast and (with a set screw) fixed in one position, then another as the season demands.

    Fastest way too get the answer to such questions might be to 'Google' it! e.g. "Autodesk." in the instant case. As has been pointed out, had you 'Googled" the string "Autodesk Instructables," you might have found this six-year old post (as I just did)" Instructables Joins Autodeskhttps://www.instructables.com/community/Instructables-Joins-Autodesk/Aug 1, 2011 - Instructables Joins Autodesk. The Instructables community is incredible: you build, bake, and create amazing things, then share your projects and ideas with the world. I think it's great when someone builds a project using instructions from our site, but it's even more amazing when we inspire someone to ...

    If you were to cross a section of 4x4 (half lap jointed perhaps) with another 4x4 forming a cross with one arm longer than the other, you could shift the pivot point to the dead center of your panels.Note the bracing is over the arm on the left and under on the right (panel side).This would preserve access to the top of your pole for your next (wind) project as well as acheiving the position of the pivot point recomened here.

    Most of the Bar B Que rotisserie motors I have sen at run on household AC. Moreover, they are not able to reverse the direction of rotation.

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  • Password Manager, Typer, Macro, Payload ... All in ONE!

    "I ended up going with a trackball for my design -- Still need to figure out a case" Hey, why not build the device into a wireless trackball mouse?Then, when you tell people "We need to log into this application," and they respond with "What, have you a mouse in your pocket?" You can simply say, "Well, yes, as a matter of fact I do."There would be/should be extra space inside the mouse for something as small as those shown here - and possibly 'then some.'

    Why not store the Pordtypin password in the cloud? Then design the Pordtypin SW to wait for that input before unlocking itself?

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on bryans workshop's instructable Built-in Kitchen Shelves! 8 weeks ago
    Built-in Kitchen Shelves!

    One can essentially create a large cabinet in this manner - look for a suitable cabinet door at the thrift shop (Habitat ReStore?) or two if you can find a matching pair. The doors from tall cabinets may well come with the cup hinges installed - making fastening to a stud a snap. All you need find is one as wide as 16" or so. If you frame the opening with 3/4 material (a 'face frame') you will gain another ten percent of shelf space (depth) in the process.

    "for all of our books"This approach would not serve for shelving books as the "shelves" are bur 3.5 inches deep. If you have th room to add to the thickness of a wall such that the result is about ten inches deep . . .

    "That it's a load bearing wall will have no bearing" is clever and almost poetry. As long as the studs are left in place, of course is the necessary caveat. Should the homeowner desire a wider shelf and cut a stud to provide that width, jacks and header will be required.

    I've found that, a half-inch diameter disc magnet, son the 'catch' end of your tape measure can serve as an effective 'stud fastener finder.' The tape is extended a foot or so and the magnet is slid along the wall until it 'deflects' or 'grabs' a nail or screw. Once that fastener is located, repeat along that line about 14->16" to the right of that fastener as studs should be 16" O.C. After each stud is 'discovered' and marked, repeat vertically from each located fastener attempting to locate three fasteners (vertically) for each stud so you can draw a vertical line between the marks to 'get a visual' and plumb line for each stud you've found.If there is a switch or duplex electrical outlet, you begin your first 'search' to the left and right of the outlet as they are alm...

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    I've found that, a half-inch diameter disc magnet, son the 'catch' end of your tape measure can serve as an effective 'stud fastener finder.' The tape is extended a foot or so and the magnet is slid along the wall until it 'deflects' or 'grabs' a nail or screw. Once that fastener is located, repeat along that line about 14->16" to the right of that fastener as studs should be 16" O.C. After each stud is 'discovered' and marked, repeat vertically from each located fastener attempting to locate three fasteners (vertically) for each stud so you can draw a vertical line between the marks to 'get a visual' and plumb line for each stud you've found.If there is a switch or duplex electrical outlet, you begin your first 'search' to the left and right of the outlet as they are almost always fastened to a stud (new construction) making it easier to locate your first stud.

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  • Benches and Tables Built As Stressed Skin Panels

    Very impressive and creative use of the construction techniques. Kudos to the upholsterer as well! "I have also used strips of the same 1/4" plywood used for the skin, as ribs glued in place"I built a 30-inch x 78-inch x 1.25-inch shelf years ago using the ribs. However, I created a lattice with the ribs (notching appropriately at the intersections) after a design I saw called Torsion Box construction. It was extremely light weight - I used .125-inch philippine mahogany 'door skins' over ribs cut from ordinary two by fours and spaced (as I recall) about 4-inches on center in each direction with the edges of thicker ribs notched appropriately to fit (and glue) the ends of the internal ribs.I appreciate the flexible router guide - never heard of it before! If you have not l...

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    Very impressive and creative use of the construction techniques. Kudos to the upholsterer as well! "I have also used strips of the same 1/4" plywood used for the skin, as ribs glued in place"I built a 30-inch x 78-inch x 1.25-inch shelf years ago using the ribs. However, I created a lattice with the ribs (notching appropriately at the intersections) after a design I saw called Torsion Box construction. It was extremely light weight - I used .125-inch philippine mahogany 'door skins' over ribs cut from ordinary two by fours and spaced (as I recall) about 4-inches on center in each direction with the edges of thicker ribs notched appropriately to fit (and glue) the ends of the internal ribs.I appreciate the flexible router guide - never heard of it before! If you have not listed a source - please add it.

    "seems to work on just about anything is (in UK at least)"Well then, let's not bring those items to the US! ;)$55/tube! https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search...

    "I still have the cut out"Well, then, fill the edge and make an aluminum-skinned occasionaal table!

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  • charlessenf-gm made the instructable Three Clamps Racks From Scraps2 months ago
    Three Clamps Racks From Scraps

    Hey, I invented this years ago!All joking aside, I like the work you did. I primarily use HFT clamps (so I can have more clamps for the money) and built my first 'rack' as a shipping container when I moved from Florida - ten dismantled and reassembled it to serve as a wall rack. I used a router and indexing jig to cut the uniform slots for the bars and made the slots deeper do I could store the clamps 'face in' or 'face out.'I do not have design software, but wish I did as the ULTIMATE design would employ a single sheet of steel cut, bent/folded to accommodate the clamp bars and the general shape of the fixed jaws such that the protruding 'pads' have a depression to rest into. -------____| with the 'rear' of the metal folded down to serve as an attachment 'plate' used to fasten the ...

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    Hey, I invented this years ago!All joking aside, I like the work you did. I primarily use HFT clamps (so I can have more clamps for the money) and built my first 'rack' as a shipping container when I moved from Florida - ten dismantled and reassembled it to serve as a wall rack. I used a router and indexing jig to cut the uniform slots for the bars and made the slots deeper do I could store the clamps 'face in' or 'face out.'I do not have design software, but wish I did as the ULTIMATE design would employ a single sheet of steel cut, bent/folded to accommodate the clamp bars and the general shape of the fixed jaws such that the protruding 'pads' have a depression to rest into. -------____| with the 'rear' of the metal folded down to serve as an attachment 'plate' used to fasten the rack to your wall (or inside of your cabinet).Manufacturing this Bulletproof Bar Clamp Rack couldn't be simpler! Using rolls of steel stock, it can be cut and formed much as is done with aluminum 'seamless gutters' and 'cut to length' for sale as 6,12.15. or twenty "Bulletproof Bar Clamp Racks." Stainless steel versions? Powder-coated racks - got an oven?All I want is 1% of your sales!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on OrenLederman's instructable Busy Cube #1 - Simple Switch2 months ago
    Busy Cube #1 - Simple Switch

    Nice job!However, given the ample room in the box and that a DPDT (1/0/1) switch is the same size . . . hmmm maybe it could do more! Maybe add another RED LED such that he could make it glow red or white (or green, or yellow). Or add a buzzer and let there be light or sound? With four AA's in the bottom, you could tap off 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 or six volts to operate outputs (LED, Buzzer) that require different voltages - maybe a small motor with an offset weight in its shaft to make the little box vibrate when activated.It is as easy to cut plexiglass as wood, so maybe the next box could allow him to see the components and light them up as well.When I was fifteen, I bought my Dad a small transistor radio (long before the digital stuff) for Christmas. I wired a micro-switch into the wrappings ...

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    Nice job!However, given the ample room in the box and that a DPDT (1/0/1) switch is the same size . . . hmmm maybe it could do more! Maybe add another RED LED such that he could make it glow red or white (or green, or yellow). Or add a buzzer and let there be light or sound? With four AA's in the bottom, you could tap off 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 or six volts to operate outputs (LED, Buzzer) that require different voltages - maybe a small motor with an offset weight in its shaft to make the little box vibrate when activated.It is as easy to cut plexiglass as wood, so maybe the next box could allow him to see the components and light them up as well.When I was fifteen, I bought my Dad a small transistor radio (long before the digital stuff) for Christmas. I wired a micro-switch into the wrappings so that power was cut when the package was laid on a surface and on as soon as it was picked up, Setting it to a loud station and turning the volume up 'all the way' insured that, it would 'blair' as soon as hi went to pick up his present.You might add a 'tilt switch' to override the DPST setting such that, if he held it 'just so,' it would light - but only if titled to the right, say.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on ablank's instructable Metal Rotating Tool Stand2 months ago
    Metal Rotating Tool Stand

    "...if my drill bit is dull and it needs sharpening..."Well, the solution would be to replace the drill press, of course ;)

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on sld7531's instructable Wood Burning Lichtenberg Figures2 months ago
    Wood Burning Lichtenberg Figures

    Am I missing something?It appears you show the equipment and finished art, write about the process generally, but neither show nor describe how the burning is actually accomplished. Also "Wood itself will not conduct electricity, so we have to make an insulating solution. Stir and dissolve 1 Tablespoon of baking soda to 1 Cup of warm water."I believe the wood is the insulator and the solution is to create a conducting solution - e.g. your water and Baking Soda solution."Acids and bases also break down to form ions when dissolved in water. Therefore, a solution of an acid or a base conducts electricity. ... Citric acid and acetic acid (in vinegar) are weak acids. Baking soda and ammonia are weak bases."

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  • Chainsaw Mill Build, Use & Tips N Tricks

    https://www.amazon.com/T-SLOT-ALUMINUM-EXTRUSION-S...https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01H1405DO/ref=asc_df_B0...http://www.flexibleautomationsupply.com/T-Slotted-...http://www.mbkitsystems.com/about-us/t-slotted-alu...Or, Google "extruded aluminium with a t-slot profile"Worked for me!

    I would like to see more detail on the 't' connections you made. I wonder if a couple of these [T Slot L-Shape Interior Inside Corner Joint Bracket] would do the job. (Amazon)It seems there are a myriad of joining brackets designed for this extrusion stuff that would allow one to avoid milling the parts. I am thinking that the hardest/strongest of bolts are only as strong as the material they are threaded into.As one supplier notes, the construction of the extrusion and fittings designed for their extrusions maximize the holding strength: "These inclined groove flanks ensure that connections and fasteners take advantage of the controlled elastic deformation, maximizing the strength of each connection." http://www.mbkitsystems.com/about-us/t-slotted-alu...Impressive Instructab...

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    I would like to see more detail on the 't' connections you made. I wonder if a couple of these [T Slot L-Shape Interior Inside Corner Joint Bracket] would do the job. (Amazon)It seems there are a myriad of joining brackets designed for this extrusion stuff that would allow one to avoid milling the parts. I am thinking that the hardest/strongest of bolts are only as strong as the material they are threaded into.As one supplier notes, the construction of the extrusion and fittings designed for their extrusions maximize the holding strength: "These inclined groove flanks ensure that connections and fasteners take advantage of the controlled elastic deformation, maximizing the strength of each connection." http://www.mbkitsystems.com/about-us/t-slotted-alu...Impressive Instructable, even more impressive results.

    I suspect the splitter would add DRAG. On a TS, the weight of the wood is not pressing down on the splitter, just helping prevent the cut from closing up. In the milling operation here, the significant weight of the off-cut is attempting to close the cut and bind the saw chain. Wedges look to be the best solution and a helper to install them as you go - even better!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on diymontreal's instructable Make a Simple Spline Jig2 months ago
    Make a Simple Spline Jig

    Also look at the "Freud Box Joint Cutter Set, Cuts 1/4 In. and 3/8 In. Joints (SBOX8) set. They are marvelous and cut a fixed width (in this case) spline slot you can repeat with confidence allowing you to cut the splines before or after you cut the slots. They also work well for box joints ;) !"

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on diymontreal's instructable Simple Corner Clamp Jig 2 months ago
    Simple Corner Clamp Jig

    You must be sighkick! I saw tour PF w/S Video and took note of your corner clamps last week with an eye to building myself a set. Last night, I sketched them out from memory but did not go further given the lateness of the hour.Having made a set that required two clamps for another project, I thought this design elegant - possibly with the addition of some fine sandpaper along the gripping edges - or thin rubber for clamping finished work. Planning on experimenting with those ideas as my mitre saw's not the most accurate tool in my shop!Thanks for thinking of me!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Reimey's instructable Motion Activated Security Yard Sign3 months ago
    Motion Activated Security Yard Sign

    Thanks for the links to adafruit!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on diymontreal's instructable Make a Simple Spline Jig3 months ago
    Make a Simple Spline Jig

    Fence issue: You may want to adhere a piece of material (wood, plastic laminate, etc.) to each side of your fence (or just to the left side) so the face of the fence is a consistent thickness. You might be able to use a clamp to squeeze the front edge a bit to remove the 'bulge.'However, as the guide built is intended to keep the work perpendicular to the table and co-planar to with the saw blade, you might consider using two pieces of 12" square plywood joined at a right angle (Use half-inch thick plywood or MDF) with the diagonal braces (thinner is the better) mounted to the inside of the vertical board.Note, too, that the jig does not need to run completely through to cut the corner as required. If, after assembly, you lower the blade beneath the table, then set the jig in pla...

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    Fence issue: You may want to adhere a piece of material (wood, plastic laminate, etc.) to each side of your fence (or just to the left side) so the face of the fence is a consistent thickness. You might be able to use a clamp to squeeze the front edge a bit to remove the 'bulge.'However, as the guide built is intended to keep the work perpendicular to the table and co-planar to with the saw blade, you might consider using two pieces of 12" square plywood joined at a right angle (Use half-inch thick plywood or MDF) with the diagonal braces (thinner is the better) mounted to the inside of the vertical board.Note, too, that the jig does not need to run completely through to cut the corner as required. If, after assembly, you lower the blade beneath the table, then set the jig in place with the center if the jig over the saw blade opening and hold the jig tight to the fence. Then (with the saw running) raise the blade up through the jig until it cuts through the jig to the desired distance/height - plus a bit. With the saw running, slide the jig through the blade until the blade passes through the 'v' in your jig and turn the saw off.Now, when using it, raise the saw blade to the desired height, put the jig in place on the saw, set the piece to be cut in the jig, then holding piece and jig, push them through the blade, stop the saw and repeat three more times.DO not pull the jig back through the blade after the cut is made, It is dangerous, and likely to alter the dimension (thickness) or registration of your spline cut.Note: Using a jig that registers to the table saw surface, you may be able to clamp a board to the saw to serve as a guide.

    When building a jig that rides along the table, consider rounding the edges of the jig front and rear so they do not 'catch' on the table (as we hear at 4:10- 44:12 in the video) You might trim the bottom of your jig a sixteenth to eliminate it riding on the table entirely.

    You might also want to make the splines before cutting the frames. With your setup, the cut is as thick as the blade in use. You might want to look at a dado blade or a full kerf sawblade and think of how to cut the slots to fit your splines.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on G S Haydon's instructable How to Dovetail3 months ago
    How to Dovetail

    "It took some surprisingly vigorous pounding on the wedge to cause one of the joints to fail."Two points here. First the test is full box joint vs half blind dove tail joints. Second, one cannot imaging 'vigorous' pounding using a wedge inside any box built with either joint!Not to mention that all the joints in the test were machine cut and that there are hundreds of thousands of examples of hundred year old furniture built with hand-cut through dovetail joints that lasted for generations without such failure as demonstrated.There is more than one way to . . . This has been but one of them.Be thankful that the author shared and took the time and effort to create a detailed set of instructions.By the way, look at Frank Klausz cut these joints without measurements and a chisel ...

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    "It took some surprisingly vigorous pounding on the wedge to cause one of the joints to fail."Two points here. First the test is full box joint vs half blind dove tail joints. Second, one cannot imaging 'vigorous' pounding using a wedge inside any box built with either joint!Not to mention that all the joints in the test were machine cut and that there are hundreds of thousands of examples of hundred year old furniture built with hand-cut through dovetail joints that lasted for generations without such failure as demonstrated.There is more than one way to . . . This has been but one of them.Be thankful that the author shared and took the time and effort to create a detailed set of instructions.By the way, look at Frank Klausz cut these joints without measurements and a chisel and back saw:

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  • Beginning Woodworking: Making a Bench Bull - a Basic Miniature Multipurpose Workbench

    http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/wk28930/?in...Veneer Press Clamps and Screws This one "veneer press clamp from Klingspor lists < $15US - Isn't Klingspor an EU Firm? If so, hurry before Brexit takes hold!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Tape Measuring Tool4 months ago
    Tape Measuring Tool

    "he large circular void is so you can see when using it as a standard tape measure."Well, that is NOT the reason the author provided: "To save printing filament, and speed up the print time, a large void was added to the middle of the long box. This part is optional, but there's no reason to have it solid, and it's a good exercise in modeling."and "A sharp hobby knife was used to ... remove the support structure from the large void in the middle."Typically, when using a tape measure, one attempts to look down onto the tape and material to be made - ninety degrees when possible as opposed to viewing from either side of the tape through a hole of any size!

    If the purpose of the large circular void was to save material and the printer left a support structure by default, why cut the support structure out? Obviously it adds strength to the piece - no harm, no foul, right?As a practical matter though, this device has limited value. The purpose of measuring and marking requires precision that this solution does not reliably afford - especially as the distance from the point of beginning increases and the tape flexes more as a consequence.

    "You're welcome to make my design better"Appreciate the instructions. If I ever get a 3d Printer . . . .

    As the author said " For rough, one-handed marking"At over half a century of using retractable tape measures from various manufactures - one-handed and with a helper - I have to agree with the author.I saw the value of the video as great instructions on using the software tool - in that regard it was darned near perfection. When making a series of equal measurements - e.g. 'every three inches along a two by - Calipers or a 'story stick' made using calipers when repeating the process along multiple boards would be preferable IF precision is the object.If not, why not simply 'eyeball" it? The tape is laid flat on the stock to be marked, the markings on the tape are right there in plain site and you've a sharp pencil at hand.

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  • Homemade 3 in 1 Multipurpose Workbench: Table Saw, Router Table and Inverted Jigsaw (Free Plans)

    "need to change the tools all the time, which is time-consuming."Certainly a consideration.I built a bench that contains a RAS, Mitre Saw and Router - 10 ft long, solid as a rock. Over the many years, now, I have found the approach 'not all it is cracked up to be.'My suggestion was directed ate hose considering a similar build as it would be foolish to suggest you re-build your admirable effort.Of course, I have a 10" Table Saw, 14" Band Saw, two other Mitre Saws and two small (portable) 'table' saws as well as a jig/sabre saw.One trick to using the sabre saw 'upside down' is to clamp it in a vise using some compressible material on each side to conform to the odd shape of the jig/saber saw - works in a pinch!

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  • Electromagnetic Fidget Spinner Accelerator

    I would think the reed switch could effectively limit the speed as it is a mechanical device. If there is a solid state alternative available, it might allow for faster revolution.As well, mounting the spinner and 'accelerator' so as to allow better control of proximity as well as a 'steady rest' might well allow for better performance.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Magnets4 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Magnets

    If you stick one of those super strong magnets on the end of a tape measure and extend the tape a foot or som it acts like a divining rod as it passes over the nails/screws in the drywall. Another approach - glue a smaller magnet to a string - same thing, just a swinging approach.

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  • Homemade 3 in 1 Multipurpose Workbench: Table Saw, Router Table and Inverted Jigsaw (Free Plans)

    Great work.If you cut the tool base first, then use it as a guide (four scraps of wood approach) to cut the rabbit then cut out the opening for the tool, you may find it quicker and simpler. If you look for Router Table Inserts, you will find information on this approach. They will provide instructions for setting the depth of cut for your insert by setting your bit depth equal to the thickness of the insert material used. Another thought. Why not simply construct three insert plates of the same dimensions and one opening? Then, switch out each tool as needed? One tool remains in place and the other two use the base as a support shelf that slides into supports under the cabinet. One switch, one dust collection, three tools.With the skills demonstrated here, I would suspect you could do...

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    Great work.If you cut the tool base first, then use it as a guide (four scraps of wood approach) to cut the rabbit then cut out the opening for the tool, you may find it quicker and simpler. If you look for Router Table Inserts, you will find information on this approach. They will provide instructions for setting the depth of cut for your insert by setting your bit depth equal to the thickness of the insert material used. Another thought. Why not simply construct three insert plates of the same dimensions and one opening? Then, switch out each tool as needed? One tool remains in place and the other two use the base as a support shelf that slides into supports under the cabinet. One switch, one dust collection, three tools.With the skills demonstrated here, I would suspect you could do this 'easily. ;)Again, most impressive build.

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  • Over Garage Door Hidden Shelving

    By the way, a project like this is a great opportunity to practice joinery skills. The frame could incorporate a simple box joint and a rabbit to 'drop the plywood shelf material into (the rabbit would actually add a half inch or so of usable height (he did not specify the thickness of the plywood used) while increasing the strength overall. Creating the Box Joint ends on the two by fours can be accomplished with a hand saw and a wood chisel (or jig saw, or band saw) while the rabbit will need a table saw or router (best way IMHO). On a project of this sort, the joinery 'finish' is not as critical as when constructing furniture so it is a jood choice for 'practising' the techniques.

    I was not taking a shot. I meant it as a thought for those readers contemplating a similar project. If you 'screw up' the eight foot 2 by it is no great loss. In the shelf build, cut it an use the pieces for the ends! Think if the exercise as Wood Class. If it takes you two tries, it is a cheap lesson. If you do it right off, you learn and get the satisfaction to boot. As they say, you can't succeed if you do take the chance. And, if you don't cuss too loudly when you do screw up, no one but you will know about it!

    My son in law used chains. They do take up less space than a 2 by! And, as the fellow said, provide more flexibility when it comes to tying into a hoist above. I envy you guys with nine foot ceiling height!

    Finding Studs with a Super MagnetI ran across this technique when re-doing our kitchen and it works!I found some on Craigslist similar to http://www.magnet4less.com/product_info.php?cPath=...You simply slide the magnet along the wall where you suspect to find a stud. when it passes over the hidden fastener (drywall nail or screw, for instance) you will feel it resist your pulling - make a mark! Measure over 16" and slide it about until you feel the resistance, make a mark and repeat.Take a level and line an edge with each of your marks and draw a light plumb line up or down to where you need to fasten your project. Slide the magnet along this line to verify (finding additional hidden fasteners along your line) you've found the run of the wall stud or ceiling joist.Then, mark where ...

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    Finding Studs with a Super MagnetI ran across this technique when re-doing our kitchen and it works!I found some on Craigslist similar to http://www.magnet4less.com/product_info.php?cPath=...You simply slide the magnet along the wall where you suspect to find a stud. when it passes over the hidden fastener (drywall nail or screw, for instance) you will feel it resist your pulling - make a mark! Measure over 16" and slide it about until you feel the resistance, make a mark and repeat.Take a level and line an edge with each of your marks and draw a light plumb line up or down to where you need to fasten your project. Slide the magnet along this line to verify (finding additional hidden fasteners along your line) you've found the run of the wall stud or ceiling joist.Then, mark where your project will attach to the wall or ceiling. In the instant case, the two by four will cover 3.5" along the line and in this area you can drive a nail to determine the edges of the stud found and, thus, locate your fastener at or very close to the center of the 1.5" thick stud. The extra holes will be covered by your project and all your fasteners will be as secure as can be.

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  • charlessenf-gm's instructable Recycle Peppercorn Grinders's weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • Recycle Peppercorn Grinders
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  • Ultralight Kayak - Middle School Project

    When updating, ask the English Teacher to help!"...My students have started building there own..."The project is most impressive. Wish I'd had you when I was in Middle School!Great job.

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    • Repairing Holes in Kitchen Plywood Sub-Floor
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  • Say Goodbye to That Formica CounterTop!

    Since a Counter-top is usually 1.5" inches thick, why not simply build the thing out of 2 x 4's? (Well 1.5" x 3.25" after milling square. Need a Planer!). Or slice each 2 by into three strips and orient them in the glue up to help remove/counter any twist or curves. Do the glue up in two 1-foot widths first, then glue these two sections together to get the final 24" needed. Cut a rabbit / groove along the wall side of the countertop and a mating tongue int the backsplash and glue these together to create a water-tight joint! Create a template for the sink cut out and use it with your router to create the opening.Your finished product looks great. If I can get the wife off the Granite counter and tiled backsplash idea, I may post my version next!

    ", this lady wanted to spend as little money as possible."Oh, I thought you were building it for yourself!If cost was an issue, I would think FORMICA (<$2/ft) would be the cheapest way to go. And, far less labor!Just recover the original counter!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Magnets5 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Magnets

    HFT Magnetic Parts dishes are prone to losing their magnets! Poor epoxy maybe. Even when new, they don't have the holding power of the ND magnets.Also, the Free LED Flash lights they offer contain thin ND magnets that can be removed rather easily.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on geotek's instructable Making Box Joints5 months ago
    Making Box Joints

    I cannot take credit for that 'idea.' It is a 'standard' approach suggested by every article I can recall seeing over many, many years.What I have not seen is the idea of marking the sides - which I think is necessary to assure one makes the cuts in the right order and to keep the 'best side out,' if you will.However, I have built several FG Boxes without every seeing instructions mentioning 'the right way' to mark the boards before cutting the joints.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on geotek's instructable Making Box Joints5 months ago
    Making Box Joints

    Good job. I appreciated the ARROWS suggested. Essentially telling us which face and edge goes where, when. I do not see the arrows on the final photo, however. Are they on the interior? Or did you sand them off?If you are making box joints of this size 'regularly,' I would suggest looking into an investment in a set of "Freud Box Joint Cutter Set, Cuts 1/4 In. and 3/8 In. Joints (SBOX8)." There are several sets available and they work 'nicely and precisely." The set I bought worked perfectly.Then, look into constructing an adjustable jig - see Woodsmith.com for one example: https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/adjustable-box... because SETUP is key and can take a while and a few test pieces to get 'right.' I also wonder about the setup block used here. Most of the folks wh...

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    Good job. I appreciated the ARROWS suggested. Essentially telling us which face and edge goes where, when. I do not see the arrows on the final photo, however. Are they on the interior? Or did you sand them off?If you are making box joints of this size 'regularly,' I would suggest looking into an investment in a set of "Freud Box Joint Cutter Set, Cuts 1/4 In. and 3/8 In. Joints (SBOX8)." There are several sets available and they work 'nicely and precisely." The set I bought worked perfectly.Then, look into constructing an adjustable jig - see Woodsmith.com for one example: https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/adjustable-box... because SETUP is key and can take a while and a few test pieces to get 'right.' I also wonder about the setup block used here. Most of the folks who do this simply flip the first piece cut and register it over the pin to line up the first cut on the mating side/edge. Making the setup block shown would seem to introduce a an unnecessary variable - as opposed to using the first set of joints to register the next/mating set.

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  • How to Build DIY Floating Shelf With Invisible Hardware

    Pocket Pegs would not appear to offer the same level of support w/o adding the screws. Also, they would prevent the shelf from mounting flush to the wall as in the build, above (without additional work to recess them into the shelving material).However, for the pins used to be most effective, they should be mounted to the studs. With that in mind, one could simply drill a pair of 5/16" holes (about two inches deep) into two studs and a matching set onto the shelf itself. Then drive tow 5/16" rods into teh wall and the shelf onto them.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable Sliding Wood Crate Storage5 months ago
    Sliding Wood Crate Storage

    Good Instructable, interesting idea & "Nice Work."Not at all sure why the 'crate' style was chosen - aesthetics, probably. However, the side against the wall, as it is not visible might serve better (as would the bottom) were it a solid piece of plywood. Less work, too build as well.One could cut a set of notched in the ends of the solid panels used (on the visible/exposed ends) to retain the 'crate' appearance.Indeed, the supports on the wall could be made from a sheet of plywood as well. This would provide additional fastening positions for both the support and the drawer slides. Adding quarter round trim to the exposed edges of the support board and painting it to match the closet wall would be a nice touch as well.

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  • Simple, Affordable, High Quality Solar Eclipse Viewer From a Cereal Box

    google "2" x 4-1/4" Shade 14 Hardened Glass Welding Lens"

    I saw some viewing glasses at LOWES fro #3 or so - cardboard with dark lens. Similar to what they sell for 3d viewing of movies, albeit with a much denser/darker lens.

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  • Digital Vibration Sensor Using LM358

    This approach might serve as a theft alarm circuit - if you added a latching circuit so that, once 'vibration' was sensed, the circuit remained 'on' for a period unless manually reset. Nice set of instructables. Good work.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Make Everything's instructable How To: Miter Saw Shadow Line6 months ago
    How To: Miter Saw Shadow Line

    Wire the thing to the saw so it is powered by the feed to the saw - eliminating the need for the triple tap and second ac feed line.I would think the LED strip lights would serve as well with far less bulk.

    Look at LED strip light kits. Smaller, bendable stips of light you can cut to length, wire to the driver/power on the existing LED (likely uses same voltage - test first) with a three-way switch to allow choosing LASER line or Shadow line while powering everything form the saw - eliminating need for triple tap and extra AC feed line.

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  • Modern Adirondack Lounge Chairs | DIY

    Really nice video and instructable. Very nice build.I LOVE the glass table top approach to setting a level surface for the build.However, the thought that came first was "How much do these chairs weigh?"Then, "What would they cost?"Then, "How would you replace the wooden parts?"

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  • Using Bread to Sweat a Leaking Copper Pipe

    Difficult to tell from the images, but it appears that your valve is entirely outside the structure. From your image - all covered up in heavy clothing - it appears you are in a Northern clime.You might want to consider (when sober ;) replacing that valve with a Frost-proof assembly.It also appears as if the incoming line is exposed to the elements. Again, a 'bad thing' if freezing weather is common.And, for the other non-plumbers reading this before attempting a repair - take a minute or two to search YouTube for "Soldering Copper Pipe" before getting out a grinder to cut out the 'bad sections!"One might also look to PEX fittings and No-Solder fittings. I would have suggested moving the hose valve/spigot assembly off to the left or right so it could be securely fasted to...

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    Difficult to tell from the images, but it appears that your valve is entirely outside the structure. From your image - all covered up in heavy clothing - it appears you are in a Northern clime.You might want to consider (when sober ;) replacing that valve with a Frost-proof assembly.It also appears as if the incoming line is exposed to the elements. Again, a 'bad thing' if freezing weather is common.And, for the other non-plumbers reading this before attempting a repair - take a minute or two to search YouTube for "Soldering Copper Pipe" before getting out a grinder to cut out the 'bad sections!"One might also look to PEX fittings and No-Solder fittings. I would have suggested moving the hose valve/spigot assembly off to the left or right so it could be securely fasted to the structure, then 't' ing off the main pipe to connect it to the line. You could, also, raise the spigot to a more comfortable height in the process. And, depending upon what was in the other side of that wall, installed a Frost-proof spigot and valve assembly taking the feed from another cold water line inside the structure.One trick that worked for me as a temporary fix (allowing time to research the 'Right Way') was to cut a piece of rubber sheet to cover the crack/leak and secure it with a stainless steel hose clamp. I did that on a feed line from the meter in Florida years ago and never got 'round to fixing the leak properly. As far as I know that temp fix is still in place!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on zposner's instructable Mechanical Iris Door7 months ago
    Mechanical Iris Door

    Given the mess found in most coops I would think a simple drop door (sliding sheet of aluminum) would prove practical. So many moving parts. Could be my chickens are simply messier than your dad's.Neat build. Envy your equipment.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on Todd W Meyer's instructable My Foam Built Micro Camper7 months ago
    My Foam Built Micro Camper

    "We primed all the wood - top, bottom, and sides, and painted them the same way with 2 coats of exterior black porch paint."Not sure about pained 2x3's Using Exterior PT wood seems a better choice. I have found painted wood rots.You might also consider an enchant solution (Phosphoric Prep & Etch) prior to priming the steel. With a spray wand, you can even get inside the square tube - just drain off the excess. It will form a rust resistant coating as it dries. It can be primed when dry and painted of course - on the outside.You can get spray able enamels at Tractor Supply along with a compatible thinner and hardener.Curous - did you mount the new tires before you painted the wheels?

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  • Rusty Junk to Useful Stuff EASY With Chemistry!

    I did this using a large storage tub with eight pieces of re-bar tied together with 10GA copper wire - essentially surrounding the object to be treated and used a battery in parallel with the charge and a solution of Soda Ash Light [the trade name for sodium carbonate (Na2CO3)] and water.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on randofo's instructable Useless Machine Instructions8 months ago
    Useless Machine Instructions

    I would suggest using standards for circuit diagrams. e.g SW-1 for Switch #1 and using standard schematics for your components to avoid confusion.Dimensions of the box and wooden 'arm' would be helpful as well.Note the correlation as between respective contacts in each image.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on smurray2's instructable Cordless/Corded Drill8 months ago
    Cordless/Corded Drill

    Dublin is it? Well, my mother was born in Ireland!

    Craftsman-like build. Impressive looking results. I have found (Craftsman 19.2V systems) that the replacement batteries (two for fifty USD are the easiest route. Sometimes, when the 'kits' are on sale, I can get a new battery and charger and sell off the old battery, charger and tool at a price that reduces my net cost of the new battery and charger far below 'list' price.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Magnetic Tea Towels9 months ago
    Magnetic Tea Towels

    You have to love how these magnetic towels grip to the 'stainless steel' appliances!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on microstill's instructable Microstill9 months ago
    Microstill

    "packing with copper mesh"Watch out for those 'copper' scrub pads - take a magnet with you before buying one - or read the fine print!I've found shiny 'copper' pads dissolve into a pile of rust and shiny 'stainless steel' pads do the same.

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on rootfamilyreview's instructable How to Regrow Green Onions10 months ago
    How to Regrow Green Onions

    They can be planted in the garden as well - and mine over-Wintered strongly and are flowiring as I write this in April.

    Our Winters have been relatively modest with few snow days. I have two down comforters , oh, you mean for the onions!Nah, I just pulled all the tomato and been plants and such but left the bucket of onions to fend for itself - it (they) did!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on gwylan's instructable A Dog Door: the Two-Flap Solution10 months ago
    A Dog Door: the Two-Flap Solution

    The plastic flaps are readily available during Election Season! I used two for the flap glued together at right angles for strength and added insulation. I also glue a thin aluminum sheet to the exterior side.What got me to comment was the picture of your dog - ours is supposed to be a pekinese-chiuaua mixture we got at a flea market in NC years ago. Would love to find another!

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  • charlessenf-gm made the instructable DIY Pull Out Trash Cabinet10 months ago
    DIY Pull Out Trash Cabinet

    Well, I'd been meaning to do this in the bathroom vanity and your project got me off the dime. Finished the basic construction, fitting and assembly using scraps and some slides I bought in bulk a few years back.I had to shorten the slides - turned out as simple as hack sawing an inch off each part and drilling a couple of holes to replace those I cut off!Because the slide was not fit between the sides of the 60" wide vanity cabinet, my base was constructed as a separate entity and will be fastened to the cabinet bottom.The pictures show the 'fitting' stage - it is presently awaiting sealant, primer and paint. I did not construct the drawer to hold a particular can figuring i might not be able to get the same size for free again and, after all, it's a Garbage Can.Thanks for the in...

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    Well, I'd been meaning to do this in the bathroom vanity and your project got me off the dime. Finished the basic construction, fitting and assembly using scraps and some slides I bought in bulk a few years back.I had to shorten the slides - turned out as simple as hack sawing an inch off each part and drilling a couple of holes to replace those I cut off!Because the slide was not fit between the sides of the 60" wide vanity cabinet, my base was constructed as a separate entity and will be fastened to the cabinet bottom.The pictures show the 'fitting' stage - it is presently awaiting sealant, primer and paint. I did not construct the drawer to hold a particular can figuring i might not be able to get the same size for free again and, after all, it's a Garbage Can.Thanks for the inspiration!

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  • charlessenf-gm commented on fixthisbuildthat's instructable DIY Pull Out Trash Cabinet10 months ago
    DIY Pull Out Trash Cabinet

    "glue the drawer bottom"As I recall, cabinet makers leave the bottoms relatively free to expand and contract within the slots/grooves/dados provided. they may tack a brad in the center or just a drop of glue to hold it in place and let it expand and contract without forcing the box apart in the process.

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