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  • How To Electro-Etch a Solid Metal Plaque

    Want to let you know that I did actually get a much better etch than I thought before I cleaned off the resist. It took two hours, but the voltage was low, and the salt solution had been used before. I mixed up a new batch of salt water today, much more saturated, and got a new charger. I'm going to try it tomorrow with higher voltage. I want to clad small gift boxes for the children for Xmas. I always bite off more than I can chew. Maybe only my two grandkids will get them this year. Anyway, the flashing I bought from Lowes is thin and cheap, so I can experiment. The only expensive part is the p&p blue. They are worth it, though!Want to say thanks!I

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  • How To Electro-Etch a Solid Metal Plaque

    OK, I tried again last night, and kind of got an etch. Not very deep at all. I think I have to increase either the salt in the solution, or the power it's getting, or both. Any ideas?

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  • How To Electro-Etch a Solid Metal Plaque

    I had scrubbed the heck out of that piece before I tried. Today, I bought a roll of aluminum flashing from Lowe's and cut a piece of that. I sanded it, then scrubbed it with Dawn to get rid of any oils. I'm now applying the resist (P&P Blue), and I'm going to give it another try tonight. I'll let you know how it turns out.Thanks so much for your reply and help!Connie Carufel

    I have used this process with great success on copper and brass, but when I tried exactly the same process on aluminum, I got nothing at all. Do I need a different salt solution for aluminum?

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