author
7Instructables9,648Views26CommentsEarthJoined October 3rd, 2014
Chemistry and electronics have been a staple in my life since I was 8 and have pretty much been my only hobbies although I have dabbled in herbalism, art, music, and various other areas as well.

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  • electricaveman commented on electricaveman's instructable A Simple Time Delay Circuit6 weeks ago
    A Simple Time Delay Circuit

    Well, I have since disassembled the circuit but I would be more than happy to answer any questions you have about it

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  • electricaveman's instructable A Simple Time Delay Circuit's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • A Simple Time Delay Circuit
      678 views
      15 favorites
      4 comments
  • ASPIR: Full-Size 3D-Printed Humanoid Robot

    Well, there is no mouth. That's the only thing that bothers me. This could have to do with the mori uncanny valley type of thing. Still, I must say excellent work and it definitely got my vote.

    I saw that after I posted that haha

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  • ASPIR: Full-Size 3D-Printed Humanoid Robot

    Excellent work, but the head needs some work, it creeps me out a little haha

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  • electricaveman commented on electricaveman's instructable A Simple Time Delay Circuit2 months ago
    A Simple Time Delay Circuit

    IC1 should be LM741CS not LM318P. I just noticed that. The concept is still the same though.

    Well, this is what I came up with. It works perfectly and I must say I like it better than the relay. I changed the resistor value going to the gate of Q1 to a 1K as well.

    IC1 should be LM741CS not LM318P. I just forgot to change the number.

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  • electricaveman commented on electricaveman's instructable A Simple Time Delay Circuit2 months ago
    A Simple Time Delay Circuit

    That would most definitely be a more robust solution. One thing I was thinking is using an op amp wired up as a comparator considering I have a few of those laying around. I'll include a picture. Most of my parts are harvested from other electronics including the MOSFET, capacitor, and relay used in this instructable so I kind of just use what I have on hand.

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  • electricaveman made the instructable A Simple Time Delay Circuit2 months ago
    A Simple Time Delay Circuit

    That would most definitely be a more robust solution. One thing I was thinking is using an op amp wired up as a comparator considering I have a few of those laying around. I'll include a picture. Most of my parts are harvested from other electronics including the MOSFET, capacitor, and relay used in this instructable so I kind of just use what I have on hand.

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  • electricaveman's instructable Electroplating Nitinol for Soldering's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • Electroplating Nitinol for Soldering
      748 views
      10 favorites
      2 comments
  • Make a Powerful 9V Rechargable Salt Battery

    11 ads in a 15 min video, has to be a new record haha

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  • electricaveman commented on Mr.Hyde's instructable Destillation Apparatus2 months ago
    Destillation Apparatus

    Well 2017 and still nothing. I'll give it a go. It looks like it starts off with the glass coffee pot at the bottom as the boiling flask, the steam rises up through the copper tube and partially condenses in the copper vase. This tube likely goes up into the vase above the outlet to provide the water an outlet without going back into the glass boiling flask. The excess steam and water would then go into the water cooled condenser column which is a tube within a tube. The steam goes through the inner tube and the coolant goes through the bigger tube. The center tube does not come into contact with the coolant much like this one-https://www.homesciencetools.com/product/liebig-condenser-300-mm/

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  • Splitting Water the Easy Way

    If oxygen was flammable, then our atmosphere would've burnt up a long time ago. That should be the only argument one needs.

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  • electricaveman followed arduinoversusevil and NurdRage3 months ago
      • Fireproof Carbon Foam From Pyrolysed Bread
      • Hacked Dollar Store Junk; Aka: Personalized Colour Shifting Nightlight.
      • Indestructible Thumb Detecting Shop Stein
      • Make a Tritium Nuclear Battery or Radioisotope Photovoltaic Generator
      • Recover Copper and Fully Recycle Spent Copper Chloride PCB Etchant
      • $50 Vacuum Pump That Can Boil Water at Room Temperature
  • electricaveman commented on noahms456's instructable 10 Minute Stewed Berry Shortcake3 months ago
    10 Minute Stewed Berry Shortcake

    I typed in chemistry and ended up here haha looks delicious though

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  • Fireproof Carbon Foam From Pyrolysed Bread

    Well, I left some charcoal on top of a wood heater one year in a mortar (a ceramic bowl used for grinding). By the end of the winter the carbon that was ground into the ceramic had completely disappeared. The top of the heater stayed above 400 f for about 7 months.

    Its in his youtube channel URL

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  • Make a Powerful 9V Rechargable Salt Battery

    They are wired in series.The zinc on the outside of the nails reacts with the oxygen in the air and oxidizes to zinc oxide and also releases electrons which flow through the circuit then pass to the copper electrode and either reduce any copper oxide to copper metal or reduce the water to hydrogen and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen ions react with the air to reform the water and the hydroxide ions react with the zinc to form zinc oxide and more hydrogen ions thus the cycle is complete except for the poor zinc. Rechargeable by no means. The salt acts as an electrolyte and catalyst and the air is the oxidant, once the zinc and iron are used up, the battery dies and has to be replaced. I have built these types of batteries before and they are nothing to get worked up over. There are metal-a...

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    They are wired in series.The zinc on the outside of the nails reacts with the oxygen in the air and oxidizes to zinc oxide and also releases electrons which flow through the circuit then pass to the copper electrode and either reduce any copper oxide to copper metal or reduce the water to hydrogen and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen ions react with the air to reform the water and the hydroxide ions react with the zinc to form zinc oxide and more hydrogen ions thus the cycle is complete except for the poor zinc. Rechargeable by no means. The salt acts as an electrolyte and catalyst and the air is the oxidant, once the zinc and iron are used up, the battery dies and has to be replaced. I have built these types of batteries before and they are nothing to get worked up over. There are metal-air batteries out there that are truly rechargeable and don't need the electrodes replaced after a while such as iron in potassium hydroxide solution. Use a graphite electrode for the positive and rusty iron for the negative. The battery essentially starts off dead until its charged at a low amperage to around 0.6v per cell. It will hold its charge for months (personal experience) and you don't have to replace the electrodes. Another added benefit is that it can be made from rusty scrap iron, plant ashes, pencil lead, and water. Its basically a half cell reaction from a nickel-iron battery (a WELL tested and reliable chemistry) but instead of using nickel hydroxide for the oxygen, it uses air and water. Its a good apocalypse battery if you want to call it that. I might even do an instructable on that considering most of my instructables are about chemistry, namely electrochemistry. Robert Murray-Smith did a good video on youtube about air batteries among other things -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiF2oM8KRHo

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  • A Homemade Trailer That Is Bolted Together

    I do agree. Bolts have their limitations, especially beyond basic, low stress framework and I don't like using them if I can weld it. This application is about the limit in my opinion and anything more complex is open to some serious speculation. There are just some things that aren't practical with bolts, just like my wood stove I built to heat my house this winter, the only bolts on it are holding the door on haha (this includes the frame and exhaust pipes) EVERYTHING is welded, besides, with bolts, its hard to get a good seal between two flat plates at a 90 degree angle, or a tube coming out of a 2 ft square piece of sheet metal but they do make for nice pivot points, especially if one shears off. One good thing about bolts though is that the parts can be easily moved or replaced but...

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    I do agree. Bolts have their limitations, especially beyond basic, low stress framework and I don't like using them if I can weld it. This application is about the limit in my opinion and anything more complex is open to some serious speculation. There are just some things that aren't practical with bolts, just like my wood stove I built to heat my house this winter, the only bolts on it are holding the door on haha (this includes the frame and exhaust pipes) EVERYTHING is welded, besides, with bolts, its hard to get a good seal between two flat plates at a 90 degree angle, or a tube coming out of a 2 ft square piece of sheet metal but they do make for nice pivot points, especially if one shears off. One good thing about bolts though is that the parts can be easily moved or replaced but that can also be a bad thing at 70 mph going down the road.

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  • Electroplating Nitinol for Soldering

    In my experience, lead is a good electrode, but only for sulfates. I was doing an experiment a while back trying to generate electricity from carbon through a chemical process (charcoal is cheap especially when you have a way to make it and 10 acres of trees to work with haha). Basically what I was trying to do was use the charcoal to carbothermally reduce a metal oxide, then by essentially making an air battery, oxidizing that metal, generating electricity and the metal oxide thus completing the cycle and one of the metals I tried was lead considering it melts at an easily achievable temperature (although the reduction temperature is high (~1200C) which lead to the abandonment of lead in favor of copper which has a much higher melting point but a much lower reduction temperature (~250C...

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    In my experience, lead is a good electrode, but only for sulfates. I was doing an experiment a while back trying to generate electricity from carbon through a chemical process (charcoal is cheap especially when you have a way to make it and 10 acres of trees to work with haha). Basically what I was trying to do was use the charcoal to carbothermally reduce a metal oxide, then by essentially making an air battery, oxidizing that metal, generating electricity and the metal oxide thus completing the cycle and one of the metals I tried was lead considering it melts at an easily achievable temperature (although the reduction temperature is high (~1200C) which lead to the abandonment of lead in favor of copper which has a much higher melting point but a much lower reduction temperature (~250C)). One of the solutions I used to oxidize the lead was sodium chloride solution, it was rather slow and the power output was low but it did work. I've tried electrolysis using lead with the tap water I have and it disintegrates within a couple of hours, even with nothing added to the water to make it more conductive.

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  • electricaveman's instructable Lead From Lead Acid Batteries's weekly stats: 3 months ago
    • Lead From Lead Acid Batteries
      631 views
      15 favorites
      2 comments
  • Determining Mass of Elements in a Compound

    Find an error? Let me know in the comments. I'm only human, well, mostly haha

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    • Electroplating Metal Oxides Onto Electrodes
      1,095 views
      22 favorites
      0 comments
  • Make a two part reusable mold using plaster

    If you preheat the mold, this shouldn't be an issue. I'm not an expert on the subject but I've read that they preheat the plaster molds almost to the temperature of the molten metal to prevent thermal shock but the mold is also broken to get the part out. They were casting iron with the lost wax method of making the molds.

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    • Extracting Copper from Brass by Selective Electrodeposition (Acid Method)
      1,307 views
      13 favorites
      1 comments
  • electricaveman followed Electric Vehicles, Speakers, Reuse, Fishing and 35 others channel 11 months ago