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  • emachine56 commented on Random_Canadian's instructable Miniature LED TARDIS Throwaways3 weeks ago
    Miniature LED TARDIS Throwaways

    This is neat! I'm wondering if after putting the electronics and battery in, could you fill the inside of the TARDIS with some wood glue or white school glue like "Elmer's" or silicone to seal the works from little hands? You might try scuffing the battery case and soldering the wires then you could leave out the magnet.Anyways, responsibility lies with the parent. Well done.

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  • emachine56 commented on 4DIYers's instructable 5 Ways How to Remove a Stuck Brake Drum3 weeks ago
    5 Ways How to Remove a Stuck Brake Drum

    make sure you turn the star wheel in the correct direction...turning so that it moves toward the center of the access hole (if the star wheel is moving towards the front of the vehicle when turned, you are going in the wrong direction and tightening the shoes against the drum). Spraying stuck drums with a penetrating oil like "Break Free" or even WD-40 around the lug bolt and center axle holes and then gently tapping in same highlighted area in method #2 with a hammer(the vibration helps the penetrant work) helps trememdously to break the rust bond around the lug bolts.Nice job, forwarded it to the grands who are still learning how fix their own rides.

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  • emachine56 commented on KarenK116's instructable Solar Powered Pipe Light9 months ago
    Solar Powered Pipe Light

    You can do it w/galvanized pipe. Clean it well, as done in this instructable as much of the pipe sold has a waxy coating on it. Dry thoroughly, and paint it with whatever you have. Priming gives the paint a good base for adhesion and provides for a smoother finish but it's not necessary. Nice job!

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  • emachine56 completed the lesson Conclusion in the class LEDs and Lighting Class1 year ago
  • LED Tape - Under Cabinet Lighting - No Soldering!

    Very nice job. I did almost the same thing in my installation. Like you, I found that the tape is just about useless. I also learned the hard way that sections of these strips will fail and removing them can seriously mar the finished bottoms of many expensive cabinets. I used yard-sticks, the thick variety found at my local orange big box home store. Cut each yard-stick to correspond with the cabinet bottom length and use 3M Command type hook&loop fastener . Apply contact cement to the back of the yard-stick and let it dry. Then attach sticks to the bottom of cabinet using the hook&loop things. Roll out your LED strips and tape them to some stiff cardboard. Remove the paper from the adhesive strips and paint the backs of the strips with contact cement. Let dry and then carefull...

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    Very nice job. I did almost the same thing in my installation. Like you, I found that the tape is just about useless. I also learned the hard way that sections of these strips will fail and removing them can seriously mar the finished bottoms of many expensive cabinets. I used yard-sticks, the thick variety found at my local orange big box home store. Cut each yard-stick to correspond with the cabinet bottom length and use 3M Command type hook&loop fastener . Apply contact cement to the back of the yard-stick and let it dry. Then attach sticks to the bottom of cabinet using the hook&loop things. Roll out your LED strips and tape them to some stiff cardboard. Remove the paper from the adhesive strips and paint the backs of the strips with contact cement. Let dry and then carefully press them onto the sticks you installed under the cabinet. They will never move or fall. If a LED strip goes bad, it can easily be removed and replaced. Hope this helps. Thanks for a fine instruct!

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  • Low Budget Knife-maker's Bench Grinder

    Dude this is just awesome. I really like the re-appropriation of parts you had lying about and splitting sander belts is absolute genius! I used wide, hard urethane (100a durometer) skate board wheels as rollers on another project (a mini band saw) that worked well and they have really good bearings. As for motors, go to the Engineering Toolbox site @ http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/electrical-syst... excellent tools here for determining the capabilities of any motor as amp draw alone is not a reliable indicator or motor capability. I totally understand using the best you have on hand for proof-of-concept purposes; not a dang thing wrong with that at all. Regarding AC voltages, you are correct, they can be all over the map depending on your distance from the xfmr supplying your AC. ...

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    Dude this is just awesome. I really like the re-appropriation of parts you had lying about and splitting sander belts is absolute genius! I used wide, hard urethane (100a durometer) skate board wheels as rollers on another project (a mini band saw) that worked well and they have really good bearings. As for motors, go to the Engineering Toolbox site @ http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/electrical-syst... excellent tools here for determining the capabilities of any motor as amp draw alone is not a reliable indicator or motor capability. I totally understand using the best you have on hand for proof-of-concept purposes; not a dang thing wrong with that at all. Regarding AC voltages, you are correct, they can be all over the map depending on your distance from the xfmr supplying your AC. I once lived 771 feet from the xfmr and was lucky to get a consistent 210VAC across both phases because of the voltage drop. Keep those gears turning in the old thinking cap...this is a fine low budget/scrounged project that fills a definite need.

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