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  • foxposte commented on Renard_Bleu's instructable Portable Fresnel Solar Oven9 months ago
    Portable Fresnel Solar Oven

    Hi Renard--Thanks for sending me your link. You did a great job with this project! I would be reluctant to cut the lens, too, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, and it worked! It occurred to me that you could use telescoping legs such as seen on some photo tripods to solve the issue of too-short legs, but your solution works fine. I watched another video where the guy was making lava into basalt rock--but with a spot lens--this is a VERY powerful and potentially dangerous lens--but then, sticking your hand in a fire is dangerous and people quickly learn not to do it! I could see the spot lens being used for spot welding, although it would be clumsy, and take some practice. Back to cooking if you don't have sunlight, what about using a Coleman gas lantern? Any kind of light can theo...see more »Hi Renard--Thanks for sending me your link. You did a great job with this project! I would be reluctant to cut the lens, too, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, and it worked! It occurred to me that you could use telescoping legs such as seen on some photo tripods to solve the issue of too-short legs, but your solution works fine. I watched another video where the guy was making lava into basalt rock--but with a spot lens--this is a VERY powerful and potentially dangerous lens--but then, sticking your hand in a fire is dangerous and people quickly learn not to do it! I could see the spot lens being used for spot welding, although it would be clumsy, and take some practice. Back to cooking if you don't have sunlight, what about using a Coleman gas lantern? Any kind of light can theoretically be used--I just don't know whether a lens of this size will need sunlight to provide powerful enough light for the purpose of cooking. The issue of tracking the sun is an interesting one--some flowers will track the sun during the day--I wonder what the physics is that allows them to do that? Doing it manually, I can envision a ferris wheel contraption, with the food in an enclosed pyrex ball, so that as the Fresnel lens pivots on one side, the food in the pyrex ball pivots on the opposite axis. The wheel need be only half a wheel, of course, or less, depending on your latitude. In the Arctic in the summer, the sun is always at approximately 20 degrees above the horizon, so there you would need to track it horizontally, instead of vertically--fascinating concepts to think about!

    Hi Renard--Thanks for sending me your link. You did a great job with this project! I would be reluctant to cut the lens, too, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, and it worked! It occurred to me that you could use telescoping legs such as seen on some photo tripods to solve the issue of too-short legs, but your solution works fine. I watched another video where the guy was making lava into basalt rock--but with a spot lens--this is a VERY powerful and potentially dangerous lens--but then, sticking your hand in a fire is dangerous and people quickly learn not to do it! I could see the spot lens being used for spot welding, although it would be clumsy, and take some practice. Back to cooking if you don't have sunlight, what about using a Coleman gas lantern? Any kind of light can theo...see more »Hi Renard--Thanks for sending me your link. You did a great job with this project! I would be reluctant to cut the lens, too, but nothing ventured, nothing gained, and it worked! It occurred to me that you could use telescoping legs such as seen on some photo tripods to solve the issue of too-short legs, but your solution works fine. I watched another video where the guy was making lava into basalt rock--but with a spot lens--this is a VERY powerful and potentially dangerous lens--but then, sticking your hand in a fire is dangerous and people quickly learn not to do it! I could see the spot lens being used for spot welding, although it would be clumsy, and take some practice. Back to cooking if you don't have sunlight, what about using a Coleman gas lantern? Any kind of light can theoretically be used--I just don't know whether a lens of this size will need sunlight to provide powerful enough light for the purpose of cooking. The issue of tracking the sun is an interesting one--some flowers will track the sun during the day--I wonder what the physics is that allows them to do that? Doing it manually, I can envision a ferris wheel contraption, with the food in an enclosed pyrex ball, so that as the Fresnel lens pivots on one side, the food in the pyrex ball pivots on the opposite axis. The wheel need be only half a wheel, of course, or less, depending on your latitude. In the Arctic in the summer, the sun is always at approximately 20 degrees above the horizon, so there you would need to track it horizontally, instead of vertically--fascinating concepts to think about!

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  • foxposte commented on Renard_Bleu's instructable Bug-Out Barrel for a Family of Four10 months ago
    Bug-Out Barrel for a Family of Four

    Thanks, Renard! I would like to explore the use of a Freznel lens--available in plastic small sheets cheaply to heat the water. It could concentrate any source of light to speed up condensation of water, but watch out! These lenses can produce very high heat and so can be very dangerous. Must be used with extreme caution. I'd make the condensation system out of copper, which has a melting point of around 2,000 degrees F. Also you don't want a "spot" Freznel lens for this purpose, as it could even melt copper, but one which produces a more diffuse area of heat--obviously, uses for solar hot water heating, and cooking are intriguing as well....I haven't experimented with any of this, at this point. I'm investigating concrete building materials using basalt pea gravel, vs. foa...see more »Thanks, Renard! I would like to explore the use of a Freznel lens--available in plastic small sheets cheaply to heat the water. It could concentrate any source of light to speed up condensation of water, but watch out! These lenses can produce very high heat and so can be very dangerous. Must be used with extreme caution. I'd make the condensation system out of copper, which has a melting point of around 2,000 degrees F. Also you don't want a "spot" Freznel lens for this purpose, as it could even melt copper, but one which produces a more diffuse area of heat--obviously, uses for solar hot water heating, and cooking are intriguing as well....I haven't experimented with any of this, at this point. I'm investigating concrete building materials using basalt pea gravel, vs. foam crete, vs. hemp crete. Finding any of these alternative materials to mix with cement is difficult, as these are not yet mainstream ideas. And I can't really afford to buy a wholesale supply of pumice pea gravel from China!

    Thanks, Renard! I would like to explore the use of a Freznel lens--available in plastic small sheets cheaply to heat the water. It could concentrate any source of light to speed up condensation of water, but watch out! These lenses can produce very high heat and so can be very dangerous. Must be used with extreme caution. I'd make the condensation system out of copper, which has a melting point of around 2,000 degrees F. Also you don't want a "spot" Freznel lens for this purpose, as it could even melt copper, but one which produces a more diffuse area of heat--obviously, uses for solar hot water heating, and cooking are intriguing as well....I haven't experimented with any of this, at this point. I'm investigating concrete building materials using basalt pea gravel, vs. foa...see more »Thanks, Renard! I would like to explore the use of a Freznel lens--available in plastic small sheets cheaply to heat the water. It could concentrate any source of light to speed up condensation of water, but watch out! These lenses can produce very high heat and so can be very dangerous. Must be used with extreme caution. I'd make the condensation system out of copper, which has a melting point of around 2,000 degrees F. Also you don't want a "spot" Freznel lens for this purpose, as it could even melt copper, but one which produces a more diffuse area of heat--obviously, uses for solar hot water heating, and cooking are intriguing as well....I haven't experimented with any of this, at this point. I'm investigating concrete building materials using basalt pea gravel, vs. foam crete, vs. hemp crete. Finding any of these alternative materials to mix with cement is difficult, as these are not yet mainstream ideas. And I can't really afford to buy a wholesale supply of pumice pea gravel from China!

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  • How to purify water in the wild with 2 water bottles.

    I just thought of a great addition to the survival kit: get a small plastic Freznel lens--they are now available very cheaply on-line--get the kind that spreads the light a bit rather than focusing it, and you can heat up your water, or cook food, especially if combined with aluminum foil for extra solar reflection. You do need some sunlight for this method to work. Be careful not to burn yourself!

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  • foxposte commented on Renard_Bleu's instructable Bug-Out Barrel for a Family of Four10 months ago
    Bug-Out Barrel for a Family of Four

    I'm working on inventing dehydrated water--think of the savings in weight! More practical is a water still--boil available water in first container, with tubing above, so steam can condense at top, and run into second container. Obviously, this idea is not new, but it is practical for slowly producing potable water.

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  • foxposte followed Organizing, Survival, Electric Vehicles, Pallets and 6 others channel 10 months ago