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  • garrydelf commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Glow Table2 weeks ago
    Glow Table

    since no one has jumped in on this here's my two cents. Stain the wood before you add the resin in moderate coats, don't let too much go down in the cavities. If using oil based products allow plenty of time for the stain in particular to dry completely, I'm talking days at a time as oil based stains are very slow to properly dry and cure. Then add the resin followed by the poly top coats. Since I've become lazy and impatient I don't use oil based products unless I have to. My stain of choice is aniline dyed shellac followed by several coats of white shellac, light sanding with 340 or 440 grit to remove any nibs and two to four light coats of paste wax hand buffed in between. The heck with all that sanding, waste of time. A buttery smooth satin finish without all the work, you're done i...

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    since no one has jumped in on this here's my two cents. Stain the wood before you add the resin in moderate coats, don't let too much go down in the cavities. If using oil based products allow plenty of time for the stain in particular to dry completely, I'm talking days at a time as oil based stains are very slow to properly dry and cure. Then add the resin followed by the poly top coats. Since I've become lazy and impatient I don't use oil based products unless I have to. My stain of choice is aniline dyed shellac followed by several coats of white shellac, light sanding with 340 or 440 grit to remove any nibs and two to four light coats of paste wax hand buffed in between. The heck with all that sanding, waste of time. A buttery smooth satin finish without all the work, you're done in a day and next to no cure time as opposed to up to three weeks for lacquer.

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  • garrydelf commented on jonassink's instructable Pipe Clamp Bench Vise10 months ago
    Pipe Clamp Bench Vise

    Be very careful using drywall screws in Kreg pocket holes. The tapered heads act like a wedge and can split your wood. Use either the Kreg screws or cabinet screws or other flat bottomed head screw from the box store which are usually cheaper. The pocket hole jig has become one of those under bench dwellers that I wish I hadn't spent my money on. I haven't had the success with them that other people have had. In most cases dowels or screw blocks are a stronger choice. Nice job on the vise. Good recovery on the mis-drilled hole, happens all the time. It's woodworking, don't point out the flaws, show the good points! :-}

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  • garrydelf commented on ana_labrincha's instructable Plywood Dollhouse12 months ago
    Plywood Dollhouse

    Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!!

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  • garrydelf commented on ana_labrincha's instructable Plywood Dollhouse12 months ago
    Plywood Dollhouse

    I was so hoping to make this but no matter what I try with my features lacking Epson printer I cannot print the templates to actual size. Without measurements to go by I guess I will have to pass.

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  • Installing Threaded Inserts in to Plywood

    There are a couple of pieces of information missing in this article. You do not go into the correct method for installing this type of insert. Your photo seems to show the insert being installed with a driver made for the purpose but many of the people reading this will not have one and won't care to buy one. There are several instruction videos on You Tube that shows the installation of this type insert incorrectly. The slots on the insert are NOT for installing the insert with a screwdriver. This is a common mistake. They are to assist with cutting the threads into the wood and are inserted into the hole first. The correct method to install these inserts is to use a bolt and a nut of the same size as the internal thread of the insert. Thread the nut onto the bolt, run the bolt into th...

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    There are a couple of pieces of information missing in this article. You do not go into the correct method for installing this type of insert. Your photo seems to show the insert being installed with a driver made for the purpose but many of the people reading this will not have one and won't care to buy one. There are several instruction videos on You Tube that shows the installation of this type insert incorrectly. The slots on the insert are NOT for installing the insert with a screwdriver. This is a common mistake. They are to assist with cutting the threads into the wood and are inserted into the hole first. The correct method to install these inserts is to use a bolt and a nut of the same size as the internal thread of the insert. Thread the nut onto the bolt, run the bolt into the insert to the end of the threads in the insert, snug the nut up against the head of the insert and use a wrench on the nut to drive the insert in flush with the surface of the wood, hold the head of the bolt and loosen the nut then back out the bolt and you're done. Running the bolt to the end of the threads prevents stretching and deforming the threads in the insert. Sorry to be so long winded but I wanted to save people the frustration of trying to install an insert only to get it about half way in and have the slot strip out and wonder what to do next. Been there, done that, don't want to do it again!

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