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  • getriba commented on 24Eng's instructable Conductive Paint5 months ago
    Conductive Paint

    hi! great info on the subject. I too make mix my own conductive paint. here's how I do it. I take water-based acrylic clear coats for flooring. I take three parts of acrylic clear coat to one part of water. Then I add about 6-8 parts of graphite. I always eyeball this as I work my way up to the consistency that I like. I always go a tad thicker than I want and then dilute it down with water again. I NEVER add any acrylic afterwards, I only add water and/or graphite. water is the key here, because you don't want too much of an acrylic resin in your mix and once the water evaporates it is literally gone completely out of your mix. too much acrylics to graphite increases the resistance. instead of acrylic clear coat (I think in US it is called water-based latex paint) you could also use an...see more »hi! great info on the subject. I too make mix my own conductive paint. here's how I do it. I take water-based acrylic clear coats for flooring. I take three parts of acrylic clear coat to one part of water. Then I add about 6-8 parts of graphite. I always eyeball this as I work my way up to the consistency that I like. I always go a tad thicker than I want and then dilute it down with water again. I NEVER add any acrylic afterwards, I only add water and/or graphite. water is the key here, because you don't want too much of an acrylic resin in your mix and once the water evaporates it is literally gone completely out of your mix. too much acrylics to graphite increases the resistance. instead of acrylic clear coat (I think in US it is called water-based latex paint) you could also use an acrylic binder. usually the restoration supply stores carry it. the same that carry stuff for oil-painters and old painting restorers. you should thin that according to the instructions and play around a bit, because some binders can be highly concetrated and need to be heavily diluted. it is slightly different, but in essence both are similar processes. I have used that on my guitars for internal shielding. I get about 50K of resistance on a Strat but a factory Strat goes up to 140K with stock coating.you always want your binder/paint/lacquer or anything else you are using in the smallest quantities possible but still allowing a good bond to the surface. I opt to use wood finishes instead of binders becase they have drying agents and additives for a hard final finish. it can be stored up to two years.

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