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5Instructables45,152Views44CommentsArkansasJoined January 23rd, 2015
I love experimenting with science and physics, especially projects that involve electromagnetism, energy conservation and audio.

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10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Shelving Contest 2016
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Shelving Contest 2016
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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Is your sister still collecting elements? I am trying to get in touch with fellow collectors to learn from them/help them. Also I would love to see her collection.

    Hi Schidtbag!I have two different kinds of flashbulbs. The big ones you can see in step twelve of my instructable. Did you read the whole thing? If not, keep reading! The bulbs may be too big for your cylinders, i will have to measure them. I also have two flashcubes that have four individual bulbs in them, and are much smaller. I collected them for zirconium/oxygen.I have been collecting for ten years now, adding a sample here and there along the way, usually discovering them in my everyday surroundings with the help of a little research. Many times I came to the realization that I had good samples laying around that I didn't even know I had.You said you are making potash? What does that entail? This probably doesn't help you any, but stump remover is mostly potassium nitrate (KNO3).Th...

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    Hi Schidtbag!I have two different kinds of flashbulbs. The big ones you can see in step twelve of my instructable. Did you read the whole thing? If not, keep reading! The bulbs may be too big for your cylinders, i will have to measure them. I also have two flashcubes that have four individual bulbs in them, and are much smaller. I collected them for zirconium/oxygen.I have been collecting for ten years now, adding a sample here and there along the way, usually discovering them in my everyday surroundings with the help of a little research. Many times I came to the realization that I had good samples laying around that I didn't even know I had.You said you are making potash? What does that entail? This probably doesn't help you any, but stump remover is mostly potassium nitrate (KNO3).Thanks for the heads up about my titanium. From the research i did before my purchase, this is what I understand: The titanium I bought is grade 2. Grades 1 through 4 are commercially pure (99.2% pure according to Wikipedia, unalloyed). They vary in tensile strength as a function of oxygen content, with Grade 1 being the most ductile (lowest tensile strength with an oxygen content of 0.18%), and Grade 4 the least ductile (highest tensile strength with an oxygen content of 0.40%). Ductility is relative however - titanium is brittle at room temperature. This means that if I tried to bend the sample I have to fit into my display it would probably just break. I have to heat it up first. All the grades after four are alloys. I read that Grade 2 is the 'workhorse' of the titanium industry, at least in ground based applications. Titanium metal is expensive to refine, and even more expensive to machine or make into anything, due to its particular properties. As for the price of the sample I bought, with a diameter of 1cm and length 10cm, it is about 7.85 cubic centimeters, so with titanium being 4.506 g/cm3, this means my sample is about 35.4 grams. I payed 2.22 USD shipping included, so thats roughly 6.3 cents a gram, or $63 per kilogram, or $28.63 a pound. Not super cheap, but it hasn't been made into a consumer good yet, which would increase the price considerably. You can wait on titanium if you like, but I waited ten long years to come across a sample 'in the wild' and never did except for the ones i mentioned that were integrated into 'nice stuff'. I love having a chunk of the real metal, something that I can hand to people and make them guess what metal it is. I found a similar sized steel rod and an aluminum one (in my junk heap) so I can let people compare the different densities. I really need to add all this to the instructable.Storing your samples in clear cylindrical containers sounds interesting. I built a display for mine for about $16 and am very pleased with it! You can check it out here.My M.O.:If I can get samples that are at or greater than 99% pure I am more than pleased, especially if the quantity is significant. This means that commercially pure elements are generally good enough for me. As fellow collector Theodore Gray noted in his book The Elements, nothing is ever 100%. Compounds of the elements, for me, are no fun because in most cases they have completely different properties than the elements themselves. Gasses are not a lot of fun either, because you can't really tell if it's in the jar/bottle/ampule or not. It just looks empty. I definitely won't be spending a lot on those! I love the metals. I want big chunks of them! Alloys are okay, especially if they contain enough of the element I am trying to represent so that the properties, at least the ones I care about like density, color, and so forth are not significantly effected.I don't know much about amalgamation, I will have to check into that, but as far as elements in computers go you have a whopping cache of elements there:lithium coin cell batteries that power the CMOSaluminum or copper heat sinks that cool the processorsneodymium magnets inside the hard disk drivesas you mentioned, circuit boards with gold substrates like RAM cardsSurface mount tantalum capacitors (sometimes a few big ones hiding under the processor or on HDD circuit boards)And then there are MLCCs (monlithic ceramic capacitors). Usually you'll find swarms of them around the the processor and large ICs. They contain noble metals like platinum, especially the ones in older units like from the '90s before the price went way up and they started substituting less noble metals. I have seen people on the web extracting the precious metals from them (and isolating the neodymium from the magnets). All of it looks like a lot of bother, especially if I have to buy a bunch of lab equipment and supplies, so I hate to be a downer but for me it just isn't realistic. You seem interested in it though, so good luck.

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Thanks for your comment! I am glad I could help. I would love to see your collection if you have one, so maybe you could post a picture. Hydrogen Peroxide really is an easy way to get oxygen. In fact, a pinch of Manganese Dioxide (the black crud from a zinc/carbon battery) in a few tablespoons Hydrogen Peroxide frees up a crazy amount of O2 bubbles really quickly! Light bulbs do indeed contain Argon, but i am not sure what the percentage is. I still need to research that. Cobalt glass is blue, but does that mean that all blue glass is cobalt glass? How can you tell? I have a bunch of Bud Light Platinum bottles. Are they cobalt glass? I do have a Krypton bulb from a flashlight, but haven't added the step to this instructable yet. I have been interested in cadmium from nickel cadmium batt...

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    Thanks for your comment! I am glad I could help. I would love to see your collection if you have one, so maybe you could post a picture. Hydrogen Peroxide really is an easy way to get oxygen. In fact, a pinch of Manganese Dioxide (the black crud from a zinc/carbon battery) in a few tablespoons Hydrogen Peroxide frees up a crazy amount of O2 bubbles really quickly! Light bulbs do indeed contain Argon, but i am not sure what the percentage is. I still need to research that. Cobalt glass is blue, but does that mean that all blue glass is cobalt glass? How can you tell? I have a bunch of Bud Light Platinum bottles. Are they cobalt glass? I do have a Krypton bulb from a flashlight, but haven't added the step to this instructable yet. I have been interested in cadmium from nickel cadmium batteries for a long time, but from what I can tell the cadmium is mixed with iron inside the battery and I don't know how you could separate it. Osmium in ball point pens? I have heard of osmium tipped fountain pen nibs, but not ball points. I would be interested in where you heard that. Spark plugs would be a good source of Iridium, however I don't think there are any pure iridium spark plugs out there, maybe I am wrong. I would love to have a clock with radium painted hands - not sure how to identify it though. As you can see, I need to do more research on these things. Thanks for your ideas about elements. I love having people to talk to about elements, and I try to add anything I learn to this instructable to save everyone else the trouble researching to answer questions they have about the elements. If you have any more ideas, or just want to chat about elements, message me!

    Glad to hear that light bulbs have that much argon in them! I will just have to stick a bulb in my collection for now, and maybe look around on ebay someday.Also, thanks for looking into the Bud Light Platinum Bottles! Looks like I have some cobalt after all, at least something to fill cobalt's place for now. Like I said I have a ton of the bottles. Maybe we should organize a trade or something! I have lots of extra samples lying around like extra flash bulbs, carbon rods, pure sulfur powder, etc. Let me know what you think.I probably should give up on cadmium from batteries, like you said too dangerous! There are a lot of elements i would isolate at home if it didn't mean possibly burning my face off with acid! I am not averse to buying off of ebay, in fact I bought my first sample off...

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    Glad to hear that light bulbs have that much argon in them! I will just have to stick a bulb in my collection for now, and maybe look around on ebay someday.Also, thanks for looking into the Bud Light Platinum Bottles! Looks like I have some cobalt after all, at least something to fill cobalt's place for now. Like I said I have a ton of the bottles. Maybe we should organize a trade or something! I have lots of extra samples lying around like extra flash bulbs, carbon rods, pure sulfur powder, etc. Let me know what you think.I probably should give up on cadmium from batteries, like you said too dangerous! There are a lot of elements i would isolate at home if it didn't mean possibly burning my face off with acid! I am not averse to buying off of ebay, in fact I bought my first sample off there about a month ago, a titanium rod:http://www.ebay.com/itm/0-4-x4-Titanium-Rod-Ti-Titan-Gr-2-GR2-Metal-Round-Bar-Dia-10mm-Length-100mm-/401249644934?hash=item5d6c57b186:g:yoIAAOSwcLxYGw-rI confirmed it was real titanium by rounding some of the cut edges on my bench grinder - it made white sparks like titanium is supposed to. It was really the only way I was going to get some titanium, as the titanium golf club I have is too nice to ruin and my sister won't let me take the titanium speakers out of her laptop because it still works :(I think you are right about the iridium plugs, I still want one though!gotta run! if I don't message for a while its not because I am not listening, i am just busy

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  • hulkbuild commented on hulkbuild's instructable Make a Fidget Spinner From a Hard Drive2 months ago
    Make a Fidget Spinner From a Hard Drive

    So shiny, so chrome!

    Thanks! XD

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  • hulkbuild's instructable Make a Fidget Spinner From a Hard Drive's weekly stats: 2 months ago
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  • hulkbuild commented on ideasquirrel's instructable How to Make a BUNNYBEAR!6 months ago
    How to Make a BUNNYBEAR!

    Good documentation. I am imagining a burly construction worker who, finishing a long day of framing a house, picks up a scrap cut from the end of a two-by-four. After a few minutes at the band saw, and a few more at the belt sander, he takes the cigarette from between his teeth and burns a few eye holes in it. Voila, BunnyBear. He goes home, and with a grunt drops it near his toddler, who is playing on the floor.

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    You are absolutely right! In fact, I just finished building a display a few months ago, and made it into a prize winning instructable! Check it out! It is super fun putting each element into its proper place on the table, and I am still busy mounting the samples I already have. Also, I hope to keep adding to this instructable as well! Thank you for commenting!

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Thank you for your comment! I am definitely still working on my collection, but may soon have to start buying samples online. Thank you for the ideas and the link to luciteria.com. I appreciate it!

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  • How to Fold an Origami Triforce from The Legend of Zelda

    Hey man, nice to see some real origami. Good write up too.

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  • Periodic Table Display for Element Samples

    Thank you for your vote and your kind words. I always hope my instructables kindle people's interest in science!

    You are absolutely correct, my display will never be totally filled. For the elements that are not collectible, you can place a picture of the element's namesake in its display space. For example, a picture of Marie Curie to represent curium or a picture of the dwarf planet Pluto for plutonium. Many of the people and places that have elements named after them also have been featured on postage stamps, and so stamps are another option. Thank you for your comment!

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  • hulkbuild's entry Periodic Table Display for Element Samples is a finalist in the Shelving Contest 2016 contest 7 months ago
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  • 4000mAh - USB Powerbank Out of the Trash Can

    I asked the owner of my local PC shop if he ever gets his hands on any dead laptop batteries, and he said he did. He said he would set them aside for me when he does, then give them to me the next time I come in!

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  • Start an Element Collection - How to Find Samples in Everyday Places

    Thanks! I put up a step about thorium in magnetron cores! I will try to watch the youtube channel for more ideas. I would love for my instructable to be the ultimate guide, I need to keep working on it and find ways to promote it online. Thanks again for the ideas.

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