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  • im3733 commented on JacoG1's instructable Let's make some pineapple beer!1 year ago
    Let's make some pineapple beer!

    Homebrewer here. Couple of points to hopefully help everyone out.With an OG around 1.040, the most you can expect out of average yeast is going to be around 4%. Most brewing yeast has an attenuation (how much of the available sugar they eat) of around 70-80%. This means your FG (final gravity) will likely be somewhere around 1.010, which is slightly sweet, but not very. With those to values, you can calculate ABV. ABV = (OG - FG) * 131.25.While bread yeast will work, it won't work WELL. Those strains have been bread to primarily eat different types of sugar than brewing yeasts. It's likely you'll end up with some off-flavors when using bread yeast. In a lot of cases, though, letting the beer sit and age longer before bottling can help with this, as the chemicals causing the off flavors ...

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    Homebrewer here. Couple of points to hopefully help everyone out.With an OG around 1.040, the most you can expect out of average yeast is going to be around 4%. Most brewing yeast has an attenuation (how much of the available sugar they eat) of around 70-80%. This means your FG (final gravity) will likely be somewhere around 1.010, which is slightly sweet, but not very. With those to values, you can calculate ABV. ABV = (OG - FG) * 131.25.While bread yeast will work, it won't work WELL. Those strains have been bread to primarily eat different types of sugar than brewing yeasts. It's likely you'll end up with some off-flavors when using bread yeast. In a lot of cases, though, letting the beer sit and age longer before bottling can help with this, as the chemicals causing the off flavors will be eaten by the yeast and cleaned up.Instead of bottling after only 7 days, I would recommend waiting a few weeks (2-3) for fermentation to completely finish, then racking (transferring) the beer to a clean container (try to splash it as little as possible, as this will cause the beer to oxidize and get a cardboard flavor), adding a SMALL amount of sugar (there are online calculators for how much priming sugar to use, target 2.0-2.5 volumes of co2), and then bottling that. This lets you control the amount of carbonation in the beer, which eliminates almost all risk of exploding bottles. If you do that, it's very much safe to use glass bottles.When it comes to cleaning, the rule you will want to follow is that if it touches the wort (unfermented beer) or beer at any point before you pour it to drink, it should be sanitized. Hot water alone is not enough to sanitize items. I recommend a sanitizer like Star-San if you are in the US (I'm not sure what's available elsewhere, sorry).Before I end on the topic of boiling, I need to point out a correction here, chlorine, in quantities safe for human consumption will NOT kill yeast. What it will do, however, is bond with other chemicals and create chlorophenols which have a plastic-like or medicinal taste (think nasty cough syrup). Boiling water for 15 minutes will get rid of chlorine, but it won't get rid of the more stable chloramines that most municipalities in the US (and many abroad) are now using. Those can only be removed by filtering. Alternately, you can use purified water from the store if you want to make extra sure.Finally; boiling. The purpose of boiling when making beer from grain is multi-faceted. It sanitizes the wort, eliminates some to most dissolved gasses, and facilitates enzyme reactions that enable a more effective and efficient fermentation. In this scenario, I would recommend boiling the entire mixture (pineapple included), primarily for the reason of sanitation. You can't know what bacteria or wild yeast are hiding in the water (though if it's treated water, there shouldn't be much) or in the pineapple (fruit commonly have yeast living on the surface, so unless it's pasteurized, it has something living on it). 99% chance that anything that IS in there isn't going to hurt you at all, but it is likely to hurt the flavor and quality of your beer. The last thing I'll say is to echo others in that you should ONLY use items/chemicals/etc. that are food-safe. If you wouldn't be ok with it touching your food or going in your mouth, keep it away from your beer.All in all, well-written 'ible and great idea. Thanks for sharing, and congrats (belated) on getting runner-up in the competition.

    Turbo yeast would result in a much drier end result, more like a dry wine in terms of sweetness (or lack thereof). If you want to bump up the ABV, the better option is to simply add more sugar. In a batch this size, each kg of sugar will raise the OG by roughly 0.016 (assuming you have 22L). Most brewing yeast eats 70-80% of the available sugar, so you can estimate the final gravity using OG - ((OG - 1) * 0.75) (you can use other numbers instead of 75%, too, depending on your yeast. Using those values, you can calculate what the estimated percent ABV will be using (OG - FG) * 131.25.E.g. OG = 1.040FG = 1.040 - ((1.040 - 1) * 0.75) = 1.010(1.040 - 1.010) * 131.25 = ~3.94% ABV

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