loading
4 Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • jbraden2 commented on andy70707's instructable Make a mini-fridge!8 months ago
    Make a mini-fridge!

    Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give yo...see more »Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give you 5.5 Amps total that need to be supplied to it. In your case, having a power supply that only supplies 1 Amp would give your entire machine 1/5 of the required amount of power, even though the power supply is working at it's max performance. This would then lead to a super hot power supply, and eventually a blown fuse.If you don't want to do too much work, you could pick up a power supply that gives about 12 Volts @ 4-4.5 Amps, and that should work for your machine. However, at least by my understanding, the most convenient way to do it would be to hook up an adjustable resistor, or just a plain old resistor, directly to your Peltier unit, limiting the amount of current it's allowed to draw. This will allow you to use a greater power supply (say, 12 Volts @ 6 Amps) and not have to worry about it getting too cold or having too much power. If you don't understand, I apologize, I'm not the best at explaining things like this... But I saw nobody answered your question, and I found it to be extremely valid for this project, so I did my best to answer it :)

    Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give yo...see more »Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give you 5.5 Amps total that need to be supplied to it. In your case, having a power supply that only supplies 1 Amp would give your entire machine 1/5 of the required amount of power, even though the power supply is working at it's max performance. This would then lead to a super hot power supply, and eventually a blown fuse.If you don't want to do too much work, you could pick up a power supply that gives about 12 Volts @ 4-4.5 Amps, and that should work for your machine. However, at least by my understanding, the most convenient way to do it would be to hook up an adjustable resistor, or just a plain old resistor, directly to your Peltier unit, limiting the amount of current it's allowed to draw. This will allow you to use a greater power supply (say, 12 Volts @ 6 Amps) and not have to worry about it getting too cold or having too much power. If you don't understand, I apologize, I'm not the best at explaining things like this... But I saw nobody answered your question, and I found it to be extremely valid for this project, so I did my best to answer it :)

    Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give yo...see more »Hey, you might not need this anymore, but the reason your power supply got super hot and died was because the Peltier unit + all of your electronics wanted too much power for the power supply to dish out. Having all of those things on the same power supply caused the power supply to work very hard to meet the demands of your devices, which made it get hot and blow your fuse. By having something that draws near or more than the declared amperage on the power supply, it'll have to work harder to supply the power, meaning heat, and also risking blowing a fuse. Many fuses on power supplys will blow if too much power is being drawn from it. So to put it in perspective, your Peltier unit draws 5 Amps on it's own. Adding in the current draw from the rest of your devices, at most, would give you 5.5 Amps total that need to be supplied to it. In your case, having a power supply that only supplies 1 Amp would give your entire machine 1/5 of the required amount of power, even though the power supply is working at it's max performance. This would then lead to a super hot power supply, and eventually a blown fuse.If you don't want to do too much work, you could pick up a power supply that gives about 12 Volts @ 4-4.5 Amps, and that should work for your machine. However, at least by my understanding, the most convenient way to do it would be to hook up an adjustable resistor, or just a plain old resistor, directly to your Peltier unit, limiting the amount of current it's allowed to draw. This will allow you to use a greater power supply (say, 12 Volts @ 6 Amps) and not have to worry about it getting too cold or having too much power. If you don't understand, I apologize, I'm not the best at explaining things like this... But I saw nobody answered your question, and I found it to be extremely valid for this project, so I did my best to answer it :)

    What do you mean by stacked? If you mean stacking them on top of each other, it wouldn't help too much. In fact, it might hurt the overall efficiency of the device you're trying to make. Normally with Peltier units, one side gets hot, and the other side gets cold. The bigger heatsink is used to dissipate the heat from the hot side of the unit to the outside, and the smaller heatsink will dissipate the cold from the cold side of the unit to the fridge. By having them stacked, I'm not too sure what would happen, but I don't believe it would change the results, compared to having only one unit.

    View Instructable »