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  • Heatless (cold) Toner Transfer for PCB making

    Very interesting post, especially to me as a retired "old school" electronic engineer. I went through all the home etching stuff in my youth - when printed circuits started and laser printers were unthought of - and developed several methods using the processes then available.(I used gramophone decks to spin boards I had coated with photo resist and had a mercury street light in a box to expose the boards. I used a dye line printer to get the transparencies and etched with perchloric acid made from HCl and peroxide. No pcs then, so the originals were black tape on cartridge paper.)It occurs to me that this process might be adapted to the transfer of laser printed photos onto canvas. The hobby method mostly used at present is to coat the canvas with a PVA based patent gunk a...see more »Very interesting post, especially to me as a retired "old school" electronic engineer. I went through all the home etching stuff in my youth - when printed circuits started and laser printers were unthought of - and developed several methods using the processes then available.(I used gramophone decks to spin boards I had coated with photo resist and had a mercury street light in a box to expose the boards. I used a dye line printer to get the transparencies and etched with perchloric acid made from HCl and peroxide. No pcs then, so the originals were black tape on cartridge paper.)It occurs to me that this process might be adapted to the transfer of laser printed photos onto canvas. The hobby method mostly used at present is to coat the canvas with a PVA based patent gunk and use this to stick the laser print onto the canvas. When dry, the paper of the laser print is soaked and abraded off. A bit iffy method but some people get good results Your technique should work if the toner prefers to stick to the canvas rather than re-fix itself to the paper.RegardsKevIt

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