loading
11 Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • ladybug2535 commented on wilgubeast's instructable Thirty Unusual Uses for Aluminum Foil6 months ago
    Thirty Unusual Uses for Aluminum Foil

    Aluminum is also correct--it's the American spelling (and how we say it) :)

    You don't need to do that! If you left the lemon juice in prolonged contact with the foil, yes there will eventually be a reaction. However the length of time it takes to cook your fish isn't of concern, as it isn't long enough anyway. Even if it did happen, it won't hurt you.

    Oh yeah, It will RUIN your microwave.

    Aluminum is NOT TOXIC OR POISONOUS. It won't hurt you. The chemical reaction I spoke of has no known health consequences. This is why it is undesirable, but it has nothing to do with harming anyone: "Sometimes when foods are stored in aluminum foil, or when foil is used to cover a pan of food, the foil will develop holes and look like it is being eaten away. Two things may be the cause. 1) When aluminum and a dissimilar metal are in contact in the presence of moisture, an electrolytic reaction may occur causing a breakdown of the aluminum. To prevent this reaction, use plastic wrap to cover metal containers (silver, stainless steel, or iron used to store food. 2) If the aluminum foil was not used with a dissimilar metal container, the reaction was probably a chemical one. It...see more »Aluminum is NOT TOXIC OR POISONOUS. It won't hurt you. The chemical reaction I spoke of has no known health consequences. This is why it is undesirable, but it has nothing to do with harming anyone: "Sometimes when foods are stored in aluminum foil, or when foil is used to cover a pan of food, the foil will develop holes and look like it is being eaten away. Two things may be the cause. 1) When aluminum and a dissimilar metal are in contact in the presence of moisture, an electrolytic reaction may occur causing a breakdown of the aluminum. To prevent this reaction, use plastic wrap to cover metal containers (silver, stainless steel, or iron used to store food. 2) If the aluminum foil was not used with a dissimilar metal container, the reaction was probably a chemical one. It is possible for heavy concentrations of salt, vinegar or some other acidic compound, or highly spiced foods to cause the foil to disintegrate. The product of either of these reactions is an aluminum salt. It does not harm the food but you will want to scrape any deposit off the food as it may impart an undesired flavor and color."It can affect the look and taste of the food but it is NOT toxic or poisonous. It won't hurt you.BY: Angela M. Fraser, Ph.D., Associate Professor/Food Safety Specialist, and Carolyn J. Lackey, Ph.D., R.D., L.D.N., Professor/Food and Nutrition Specialist, North Carolina State University (August 2004)

    View Instructable »
  • ladybug2535 commented on wilgubeast's instructable Thirty Unusual Uses for Aluminum Foil6 months ago
    Thirty Unusual Uses for Aluminum Foil

    As far as foil (or tin) and food, you really only need to be concerned (if at all) with acidic foods such as tomato and pineapple. If it's not acidic there will be no chemical reaction. You don't need to ban aluminum from your kitchen or your cooking. Your own exposure will depend completely on how often you consume those types of foods and how you use your foil For standard cooking or kitchen use it is perfectly safe.

    As far as foil (or tin) and food, you really only need to be concerned (if at all) with acidic foods such as tomato and pineapple. If it's not acidic t(in the chemical sense, not just digestive) here will be no chemical reaction. It's the chemical reaction that allows the metal to leach into your food. This is also why it isn't advisable to leave tomato or pineapple in their cans once you've opened them. Once the air makes contact with these acidic foods the process begins. However, It is perfectly safe to leave anything else in the can, and it is perfectly safe to use foil in contact with non-acidic foods. On the other hand leaving these acidic foods in contact with these metals for a short time isn't going to hurt you either, and it would take repeated contact-a lot of contact, in...see more »As far as foil (or tin) and food, you really only need to be concerned (if at all) with acidic foods such as tomato and pineapple. If it's not acidic t(in the chemical sense, not just digestive) here will be no chemical reaction. It's the chemical reaction that allows the metal to leach into your food. This is also why it isn't advisable to leave tomato or pineapple in their cans once you've opened them. Once the air makes contact with these acidic foods the process begins. However, It is perfectly safe to leave anything else in the can, and it is perfectly safe to use foil in contact with non-acidic foods. On the other hand leaving these acidic foods in contact with these metals for a short time isn't going to hurt you either, and it would take repeated contact-a lot of contact, in order to build up enough in your system for any concern. Moreover, aluminum in cooking utensils does not get into food, and the aluminum that does occur naturally in some foods, such as potatoes, is not absorbed well by the body.You don't need to panic! The point is, you don't need to ban aluminum from your kitchen or your cooking. Your own exposure will depend completely on how often you consume those types of foods in ADDITION to how you use your foil For standard cooking or kitchen use it is perfectly safe. In regards to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease there is no credible scientific evidence linking these with the use of aluminum foil. Frankly, they have no idea as to what triggers these disorders, which also existed BEFORE the household or food related manufacturing of aluminum foil. There's been no link with metal toxicity. For that matter, foil and tin have been in constant use in the kitchen and for food storage since the beginning of the 1920s (Alzhiemer's identified in 1906), so any increase is far more likely to living longer and better diagnostics, not foil. People were more at risk from the lead in the tin can solder (no longer used) than aluminum exposure. Glass was expensive and fragile, so metals were a more economic and durable choice. Frankly, you are at more risk being a couch potato.There is no need to freak out. Though I'm sure you meant well, I get tired of people scaring each other needlessly.

    View Instructable »