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5Instructables126,456Views10Comments18766 John J Williams Hwy, Unit 4, Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971Joined February 13th, 2012
Lakeside Pottery, a nationally recognized Ceramic and Sculpture Restoration studio, established in 2001 as a ceramic art and pottery teaching facility operating for 13 years. We are now focused only on ceramic and sculpture repair and restoration in addition to custom made pottery and Kintsugi art. Lakeside Pottery is owned and managed by the husband and wife team of Patty Storms and Morty Bachar (see bios). They combine their many years of teaching, pottery, sculpting, engineering and paint... Read More »

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  • lakesidepottery commented on biskies's instructable DIY Faux Kintsugi9 months ago
    DIY Faux Kintsugi

    Kintsugi art gallery - some additional ideas: http://lakesidepottery.com/Pages/kintsugi-pottery-gallery-for-sale.htm

    Kintsugi art gallery - some additional ideas:http://lakesidepottery.com/Pages/kintsugi-pottery-gallery-for-sale.htm

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  • How to Fix Broken China, Pottery or Porcelain

    See more pottery, ceramic and sculpture repair lessons.http://lakesidepottery.com/Pages/Repairing-restoring-ceramic-porcelain-china-pottery-lessons-tutorials.html

    See more pottery, ceramic and sculpture repair lessons.http://lakesidepottery.com/Pages/Repairing-restoring-ceramic-porcelain-china-pottery-lessons-tutorials.html

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  • Repairing and Restoring Chipped, Pottery, China, Ceramic or Figurine

    Kintsugi Art Metaphor: "Mending Broken Pottery With Gold"What Can We Learn From a Broken Pot? Kintsugi, as the practice is known, gives new life or rebirth to damaged or aging ceramic objects by celebrating their flaws and history. One can consider how we might live a kintsugi life, finding value in the, missing pieces, cracks and chips – bringing to light the scars that have come from life experiences, finding new purpose through aging and loss, seeing the beauty of 'imperfection' and loving ourselves, family and friends even with flaws.

    Kintsugi Art Metaphor: "Mending Broken Pottery With Gold"What Can We Learn From a Broken Pot?Kintsugi, as the practice is known, gives new life or rebirth to damaged or aging ceramic objects by celebrating their flaws and history. One can consider how we might live a kintsugi life, finding value in the, missing pieces, cracks and chips – bringing to light the scars that have come from life experiences, finding new purpose through aging and loss, seeing the beauty of 'imperfection' and loving ourselves, family and friends even with flaws.

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    • Repairing and Restoring Chipped, Pottery, China, Ceramic or Figurine
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      7 comments
  • Mending and Filling Broken Ceramic and Pottery

    Thank you all for your kind notes. Perhaps more repair and restoration tutorials can be useful to post. If you have any thoughts of what knowledge we can pass on to the "DIY" community, please let us know.Patty and MortyLakeside Pottery Studio - All Posted Tips and Lessons

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  • Mending and Filling Broken Ceramic and Pottery

    Thank you for your comment. Rice will probably work well with smaller projects but with larger projects, you want to use the plastic pebbles / pellets (see picture). Some people use send but we found it to be a problem where it sticks to everything. If you use rice, make sure no one cooks it later : )Patty and Morty

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  • How to repair broken ceramic, pottery, porcelain or china?

    Ceramic restoration materials are not food safe, liquid or heat proof (over 190 degree F) and therefore repaired items should not be used on cooking or food serving ware. We are in touch with the restoration industry materials leaders and no food safe epoxies or cold glazes are available at this time. There are some temperature resist epoxies (not food safe) that can withstand over 400 degree F - see PC-Fahrenheit or JB Weld that we have used successfully in the past. Restored items should also not be washed, not to used with liquids and not be used with food (food acids or salt may effect the restoration); the restored item is for display only. If cleaning is required, you can use damp soft cloth applied gently without scrubbing. For more details how to fix missing chip

    Good question! Ceramic restoration materials are not food safe, liquid or heat proof (over 190 degree F) and therefore repaired items should not be used on cooking or food serving ware. We are in touch with the restoration industry materials leaders and no food safe epoxies or cold glazes are available at this time. There are some temperature resist epoxies (not food safe) that can withstand over 400 degree F - see PC-Fahrenheit JB Weld or PC-Fahrenheit JB Weld that we have used successfully in the past. Restored items should also not be washed, not to used with liquids and not be used with food (food acids or salt may effect the restoration); the restored item is for display only. See more ceramic and sculpture repair lessons

    Matching colors, texture and sheen is the longest part of process to master restoring ceramic, pottery or sculpture. The likelihood of finding the right color right out of an off the shelf container is very slim. Mixing will be required for a good match. The match must be perfect if it is expected to be invisible. To make a color match perfectly, one must take into account the fact that the color could change as it dries and could change again once cold glaze is applied. The changes are sometimes making the color darker, sometimes lighter and sometimes the hue is modified. The paintings we use are acrylics, oil, enamel or mineral pigments depending on the projects. A good starting point for first time DIY job is to use water base Acrylics. See more specific details of painting process

    Hi, matching colors, texture and sheen is the longest part of process to master restoring ceramic, pottery or sculpture. The match must be perfect if it is expected to be invisible. The likelihood of finding off the shelve blue that will match will is not very good and mixing with more colors for a good match is required. To make a color match perfectly, one must take into account the fact that the color could change as it dries and could change again once cold glaze is applied. The changes are sometimes making the color darker, sometimes lighter and sometimes the hue is modified. The paintings we use are acrylics, oil, enamel or mineral pigments depending on the projects. A good starting point for first time DIY job is to use water base Acrylics. See more about coloring repaired po...

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    Hi, matching colors, texture and sheen is the longest part of process to master restoring ceramic, pottery or sculpture. The match must be perfect if it is expected to be invisible. The likelihood of finding off the shelve blue that will match will is not very good and mixing with more colors for a good match is required. To make a color match perfectly, one must take into account the fact that the color could change as it dries and could change again once cold glaze is applied. The changes are sometimes making the color darker, sometimes lighter and sometimes the hue is modified. The paintings we use are acrylics, oil, enamel or mineral pigments depending on the projects. A good starting point for first time DIY job is to use water base Acrylics. See more about coloring repaired pottery and sculpture

    View Instructable »