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  • lcole1 commented on sajingeo's instructable Host your website on Raspberry pi8 months ago
    Host your website on Raspberry pi

    Before the start of this explanation, the contributor should have mentioned that if you are on a subnet of your ISP, you cannot do this. To set up a Pi as a NAS Webserver on your router, you MUST have a public IP (you can check this by searching 'What is my IP' from Google, and if it does not match what your router tells you its IP is, then you are on a subnet (a private one) operated by your ISP, most likely with port-blocking in place to prevent two-way tunnels from being established). Check your IP, check against your router's external IP, and only if they are the same will this work. A hint that you are on a private subnet is if your router says it is at 172.16.x.x (a reserved private subnet sequence) or 192.168.x.x (another private reserved subnet sequence), you are basically 'wall...see more »Before the start of this explanation, the contributor should have mentioned that if you are on a subnet of your ISP, you cannot do this. To set up a Pi as a NAS Webserver on your router, you MUST have a public IP (you can check this by searching 'What is my IP' from Google, and if it does not match what your router tells you its IP is, then you are on a subnet (a private one) operated by your ISP, most likely with port-blocking in place to prevent two-way tunnels from being established). Check your IP, check against your router's external IP, and only if they are the same will this work. A hint that you are on a private subnet is if your router says it is at 172.16.x.x (a reserved private subnet sequence) or 192.168.x.x (another private reserved subnet sequence), you are basically 'walled in' and can't serve. Then, it's a provider or nothing (like GoDaddy).

    What you are saying is incorrect. If your WAN is something like 199.165.x.x, and your router is different, like 172.16.x.x, then chances are you are on your ISP's private subnet. There is no way to have a stable website this way. While your ISP may have their port 80 open on the 199.165.x.x IP, what you are actually doing is having a 'house party' on that IP, and hoping that no one else is hosting on that IP within the subnet. If another person does the same thing on your ISP's public IP number, both sites go down and chances are, your ISP blocks port 80 for everyone. It takes a tunnel to make this stable, and only the ISP could provide the tunnel you need. If your 'what is my IP' google search gives you a different IP than your router's external side, then you are on your ISP's private...see more »What you are saying is incorrect. If your WAN is something like 199.165.x.x, and your router is different, like 172.16.x.x, then chances are you are on your ISP's private subnet. There is no way to have a stable website this way. While your ISP may have their port 80 open on the 199.165.x.x IP, what you are actually doing is having a 'house party' on that IP, and hoping that no one else is hosting on that IP within the subnet. If another person does the same thing on your ISP's public IP number, both sites go down and chances are, your ISP blocks port 80 for everyone. It takes a tunnel to make this stable, and only the ISP could provide the tunnel you need. If your 'what is my IP' google search gives you a different IP than your router's external side, then you are on your ISP's private subnet. You are 'walled in', and cannot host (unless your ISP offers this 'extra feature', most-likely for a charge).

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