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  • marshgre commented on Paige Russell's instructable Pine Sprig Ice Cubes11 months ago
    Pine Sprig Ice Cubes

    I'm afraid you are confusing pine with balsam fir. It's a common mistake made by the prevalent misuse of the word "pine" to refer to all needle bearing trees. The indigenous peoples of Eastern Canada would cook the needles and inner bark from balsam fir to produce a tea that is high in vitamin C - they shared this recipe with the early French settlers as a treatment for scurvy. Pine trees were rendered for their pitch that was used as an adhesive and sealant when building canoes.Yew does NOT resemble pine in any way - it could however get mixed up with balsam fir if you ignore the different shapes of the trees.attached are pictures showing balsam fir, yew, and pine needles (in that order)

    See below. Pine is being used wrong. The poster of this intractable is using either spruce (that is used as a treatment for gastric disorders) or balsam fir (that is used for its high vitamin C)Many people misuse the word "pine" when they actually mean coniferous.

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  • marshgre commented on Paige Russell's instructable Pine Sprig Ice Cubes11 months ago
    Pine Sprig Ice Cubes

    Please avoid pine for this recipe!Pine contains terpenes that are toxic.Trees like balsam fir, and white or black spruce are good choices.Pine, cedar, and hemlock are toxic. Cat spruce is extremely unpleasant! (you'll know why it's called CAT spruce ;-) )Sorry for being "that guy".

    Mint or basil are good candidates too. I say match the herb to the drink!

    I think the fact that the word "pine" is being substituted for word "evergreen" is the bigger problem here.Pine is a species of tree. Evergreen is the entire grouping of needle bearing trees. The fact that people confuse this seemingly insignificant piece of botanical information is very frustrating and apparently dangerous.

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