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  • mikebyers47 commented on TheWaterDog's instructable Drilling Holes in Glass Bottles7 months ago
    Drilling Holes in Glass Bottles

    I also should mention that if you're drilling holes in flat pieces of glass, you can make a little basin out of scrap counter top material, etc. and actually drill your piece under water.

    I've done this a few times, and it involved building a fixture to hold the glass vertical and keep it steady. This will work with a diamond hole saw in a drill press, but I think you could also do it (working slowly) with a hand-held tool and a small diamond-coated bit to start. You'll definitely want to keep water on the area you're drilling. If you have access to a glass router, the tool that a lot of stained glass shops have, you can use this to easily enlarge the hole you made with the hand-held tool. Again, keep it wet with a spray bottle. Oh, yeah...eye protection is a must.

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  • mikebyers47 commented on TheWaterDog's instructable Drilling Holes in Glass Bottles7 months ago
    Drilling Holes in Glass Bottles

    It will help if you use some plumbers' putty to build a little dam around the area to be drilled. Use a squirt bottle to keep this dam full of water, and frequently back your drill out to get rid of glass dust and paste. I hate to tell you this, but buying the best, most-expensive drills will pay off if you have many holes to drill. Pay attention to what the bit manufacturer says about drill speeds: it makes a difference. And make yourself a cradle (a couple of pieces of wood) to hold the glass steady while you're drilling. A couple of big rubber bands around the bottle and cradle will keep the bottle from turning while you're drilling. Gloves: my take is that gloves around a drill press or lathe are dangerous, and more likely to catch on the drill shaft than bare fingers. That'...

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    It will help if you use some plumbers' putty to build a little dam around the area to be drilled. Use a squirt bottle to keep this dam full of water, and frequently back your drill out to get rid of glass dust and paste. I hate to tell you this, but buying the best, most-expensive drills will pay off if you have many holes to drill. Pay attention to what the bit manufacturer says about drill speeds: it makes a difference. And make yourself a cradle (a couple of pieces of wood) to hold the glass steady while you're drilling. A couple of big rubber bands around the bottle and cradle will keep the bottle from turning while you're drilling. Gloves: my take is that gloves around a drill press or lathe are dangerous, and more likely to catch on the drill shaft than bare fingers. That's just my take, but I've never had a problem in 30+ years of drilling glass in my studio. Be sure to remove any rings, too. Good article, and I hope this helps you some.

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  • mikebyers47 commented on JP'sW's instructable Make a Cool Light from a Whiskey Bottle8 months ago
    Make a Cool Light from a Whiskey Bottle

    That's true, and I usually use a small sprayer bottle to keep the glass wet as the bit goes through. For drilling larger hoses, a drill press with a coolant/water spray is what you need, but if you're drilling just a few holes and don't want to buy a coolant spray rig, you can always have a friend keep the bit wet with a sprayer as you operate the drill. For very large holes, I've had good success with masking off the area to be cut with a layer or two of 4--mil rubber and the making the initial cut out with a pressure pot blaster using silicon carbide. A standard glass router can then be used to do the necessary clean-up.

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  • mikebyers47 commented on JP'sW's instructable Make a Cool Light from a Whiskey Bottle10 months ago
    Make a Cool Light from a Whiskey Bottle

    To drill holes in glass, plumber's putty (a soft putty used to form seals between sinks and drains, etc.) is just the thing. Roll a small piece of putty into 1/4 to 1/2 inch thickness and form it into a circle. Place the circle of putty over the spot to be drilled and use water to fill the putty "dam". Keep the dam filled with water, and frequently back the drill out to insure it's not clogged with glass residue as you're drilling. An eye dropper is useful for this. No glass dust, and very little heating of the bit or glass if you do it correctly.

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