loading
1Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile
  • DIY Hi-Fi: Vintage Receiver Repair and Modification

    Hi -Great article! I have about half dozen wonderful pieces that I got over the years including my first integrated amp when i was in 6th grade, a Kenwood KA 5700. "A vintage receiver in need of repair will run you about 30 bucks, and can be brought back to better-than-factory condition for about 50 to 70 dollars, plus a couple hours of your time." That's nice to hear. A local shop has a minimum price of 185 for repair! I have another KA 5500 that runs a pair of GNPs (mid & tweeter) on "A", and then the matching 2x8 GNP subwoofer on "B"....Clicked to "A" the speakers sound fine (although not much bass), when I click "B" I hear the mid & lower frequencies, somewhat odd sounding, coming from the sub. When I click A & B, it's s...see more »Hi -Great article! I have about half dozen wonderful pieces that I got over the years including my first integrated amp when i was in 6th grade, a Kenwood KA 5700. "A vintage receiver in need of repair will run you about 30 bucks, and can be brought back to better-than-factory condition for about 50 to 70 dollars, plus a couple hours of your time." That's nice to hear. A local shop has a minimum price of 185 for repair! I have another KA 5500 that runs a pair of GNPs (mid & tweeter) on "A", and then the matching 2x8 GNP subwoofer on "B"....Clicked to "A" the speakers sound fine (although not much bass), when I click "B" I hear the mid & lower frequencies, somewhat odd sounding, coming from the sub. When I click A & B, it's sounds terrible, no high frequencies, just a bunch of mid and low mid. I'm not an electronics expert, but I'm pretty technical. Is this an easy fix? Thanks for your time!

    View Instructable »