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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish Sauna24 days ago
    Finnish Sauna

    Timer system, as you described, might not be as good as you think. I am preparing another instructable to make a digital sauna controller, however it's not ready. For this sauna size you could basically just use regular switch, as temperature is really stable after you get to 80°C. It takes roughly 15 minutes for 5° difference. With switch you can just turn it on, go inside for 10-15 minutes, come out ans switch it off. Just before re-entering you switch it back on. After couple of usages you will master the timing. My "fancy controller" made with raspberry pi died due to SD card failure and I was controlling my sauna like I described for months.

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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish Sauna9 months ago
    Finnish Sauna

    Looks awesome! Maybe I get a chance to see that in person <3

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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish Sauna9 months ago
    Finnish Sauna

    How does "half a year later" feedback goes?

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  • mucek4's instructable Finnish sauna's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Finnish sauna
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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish sauna1 year ago
    Finnish sauna

    There was almost no resin. I have choose planks without visible parts where resin could form. On two spots that did form I have cooled sauna down and use sharp knife to remove resin.For power calculations I have found on internet (I don't remember exactly where) for every 1 - 1.25 m^3 of air 1kW heater is recommended. I got my heater second hand so choosing it's power was not exactly science.

    If you have any more questions feel free to ask.

    80g/kg is 13% humidity at 80°C. This is still dry, compare to Turkish 100% fog. But yes. Adding water helps regulate humidity in air.

    This is something I am getting hard to believe. At 80°C and 80% humidity you need approx. 0.5l of water per 1m^3 of air in sauna. That is 4 liters of water for my sauna - not counting any humid air that goes out trough vent-hole. At 120°C you need almost 5 liters of water per 1 cubic meter of air to keep 80% humidity. If that is true and you do take 50 - 100l of water to sauna and pour it on stones that's fine, but at the same time I would like to see that.My sauna bucket holds approx. 12 liters of water and we use that much of water trough the sauna session. That way we keep humidity up to 30%, normally about 20%.

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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish sauna1 year ago
    Finnish sauna

    This is something I didn't know. Reflective barrier is just under inside spruce planks, but primary job is to keep moisture in.

    I prefer the Finnish sauna... would be the answer. I don't know.Finnish sauna has hot air that makes you sweat. Usually 60 Celsius +Infrared has infrared heaters, that heats you directly and not air. Air temperature is about 40, but you still sweat. However there is no stones to put water on them, to regulate humidity, there is no "let's make hell temperature" as you can't. However it does consume less power.

    Spruce was already dried. It did let some resin out, but not as much as I expected. I didn't use spruce for benches, I used linden. It's more or less the only local tree (here in Slovenia) that could be used for this.Ventilation is made as you have describe it. There is air intake under heater and on the opposite corner on the ceiling. I can take close pictures if you like?

    Do you have any pictures to compare?

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  • mucek4 commented on mucek4's instructable Finnish sauna1 year ago
    Finnish sauna

    Hey. Traditional Finnish sauna is dry and hot (humidity less than 20%, temperatures ranging between 60 - 120 Celsius (140 - 250F) with average between 80-100. It's traditionally heated up with wood, but now-days electrical heater is used.Other types are Turkish sauna (or Turkish bath) where temperatures are between 40-60 with 100% humidity (fog).You can have Infrared sauna, that uses infrared heaters to heat your body and not directly air around you. This type is the cheapest one and you can get them for like 1000€ in supermarkets.Smoke sauna is rarely used today, but it's the wood burning Finnish sauna without chimney.I selected this dry and hot with electric heater cause it's the preferred sauna type of me and my wife.

    Hey. True. At the time of writing I didn't have picture of stove with me. I just went down and took a picture. I have attached images in the article. Finnish sauna does not use a lot of water. A bucket of water is used to pour water over stones and it should evaporate immediately. The little amount of water that could go trough is caught in a small collector at the bottom of the stove. We are using the sauna for little over a year and we didn't have any problems with water.

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