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  • Iron Man! How I Made My Own Metallic Piece

    I don't think anyone here has the rights to make copies & sell them on Etsy. Making clones of toys for a gift is questionable at best but probably not going to provoke legal repercussions. Selling duplicates of Marvel's IP on the internet may bring in their lawyers, especially as it is literally moulded from their design, which is probably copyrighted/ trademarked/ registered etc. Look for the small print on the toy.Making things because you can is fun but consider the legality of reproducing other peoples work for profit.

    If you do a lot of it get a burnisher, they are simply a piece if hard material that is polished smooth, often steel but you can get stone & other materials.e.g. https://www.amazon.com/Curved-Burnisher-Bezel-Setting-Stone/dp/B000RAYBMGJewellers/ metalsmiths use them to polish hard to reach areas & create effects.

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  • Basic Silver Soldering With Strong Joints

    This looks like an impressive electric kiln for melting aluminium that made me remember this topic.Kids eh… :)I still wouldn't use it for soldering but the project looks nice.

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  • Basic Silver Soldering With Strong Joints

    As a jeweller I have soldered 'tiny' items by hand with a torch & tweezers. It is simply a technique that requires some practice to learn but can be picked up if you are willing to invest time experimenting & have some aptitude for practical working. Ideally use similar metals to learn, copper, brass, nickel, gilding metal and silver can stand in for gold & other precious metals.If the kiln idea works best for you, go for it. I just think that there are existing methods to make soldering easier, for example steel wire is often used to hold parts whilst soldering jewellery - lookup soldering with binding wire e.g…Spring tweezers also help to hold jobs in some cases (& can sink some heat away)…https://www.amazon.com/Testors-8942T-Reverse-Actio...Flux & so...

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    As a jeweller I have soldered 'tiny' items by hand with a torch & tweezers. It is simply a technique that requires some practice to learn but can be picked up if you are willing to invest time experimenting & have some aptitude for practical working. Ideally use similar metals to learn, copper, brass, nickel, gilding metal and silver can stand in for gold & other precious metals.If the kiln idea works best for you, go for it. I just think that there are existing methods to make soldering easier, for example steel wire is often used to hold parts whilst soldering jewellery - lookup soldering with binding wire e.g…Spring tweezers also help to hold jobs in some cases (& can sink some heat away)…https://www.amazon.com/Testors-8942T-Reverse-Actio...Flux & solder have a habit of moving as they are heated & melt - you can easily address that by hand with a metal soldering 'pick' & extra flux (an old needle file or similar works fine). If using a kiln you will need to let the work cool enough before moving to check a joint, so it could take some time to make the same alterations. Generally solder moves towards the heat (provided it is fluxed) which a torch controls easily, I don't know how you would do that in a kiln setup with any degree of accuracy.For ultra fine jobs you need to use a micro torch, often an acetylene based torch is used (or laser/ electrical welding) but that is not required for most handmade jewellery. I have also seen electric heating elements get up to red heat but I haven't tried building a kiln with them for heating other metals to solder - a torch is how I learned the process.Good luck with whatever you decide, learning is part of the fun.

    Kiln soldering works OK but I doubt you will get up to 750ºC (nearly 1,400ºF) to melt silver solder using just an electric cooktop.If you have a technique to modify or overdrive the element up to 750ºC post it here as far as I know most cooker elements are intended for less than a few hundred degrees. A torch & fire brick is faster, easier and simpler for soldering, items can move as flux & solder flows & the metal expands, you can't easily deal with that in a kiln, spring clamps will also weaken as you get up to temp, so they may be ruined in a kiln.

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  • Basic Silver Soldering With Strong Joints

    To do more complex tasks, clean off all flux from previous joints, otherwise they can easily re-melt when soldering additional joints. You can also try coating existing joints with 'anti flux' products that reduce the chance of joints melting. Tippex, pencil lead or rouge polish are cheap alternatives that can do a similar job in a pinch just avoid the fumes as they are heated.Removing them post soldering is best done with pumice powder or a scratch brush, they can occasionally become hard to remove with pickling alone (alum is a cheap, safe pickle worth trying too). Bear in mind that steel will contaminate some pickle solutions, causing them to copper plate the metals. You can also get different grades of silver solder, a jewellery trade supplier (or bullion dealer) will be able to pro...

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    To do more complex tasks, clean off all flux from previous joints, otherwise they can easily re-melt when soldering additional joints. You can also try coating existing joints with 'anti flux' products that reduce the chance of joints melting. Tippex, pencil lead or rouge polish are cheap alternatives that can do a similar job in a pinch just avoid the fumes as they are heated.Removing them post soldering is best done with pumice powder or a scratch brush, they can occasionally become hard to remove with pickling alone (alum is a cheap, safe pickle worth trying too). Bear in mind that steel will contaminate some pickle solutions, causing them to copper plate the metals. You can also get different grades of silver solder, a jewellery trade supplier (or bullion dealer) will be able to provide you with hard, medium and easy grades (there are others like enamelling - extra high temp & extra easy - lowest temp).

    A soldering iron heats up to around 200-350ºC depending on the model & the solder that is being used. That is fine for electronic items that cannot handle more heat. Electronics solder is also much weaker than silver solder but may be adequate for some uses, it also does not generally take a good finish compared to silver solder. You may be able to solder small metal items with a soldering iron but the heat will quickly 'sink away' on larger items preventing it melting correctly, leaving weak bonds.Silver solder melts at a much higher temperature, more like 600-750ºC. You need a heat source capable of reaching that temperature to solder with silver based solder, generally a gas torch.

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  • not_a_droid commented on Funguypro's instructable DIY Raspberry Pi Indoor Outdoor Webcam4 months ago
    DIY Raspberry Pi Indoor Outdoor Webcam

    Use etcher to write the image to the SD card, http://etcher.io (Windows users could use that too). The Pi foundation have a page on how to use etcher…https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/magpi-video-tutor...ssh is accessed via Terminal, which is built in on OS X. I can't see anything else that is required.

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  • Raspberry Pi as a NAS (Network Attached Storage)

    The Pi hardware uses USB for the built in ethernet port & the USB storage, USB2 speeds are shared between both devices.It means NAS solutions like this are limited by how quickly the Pi can route data over USB. I did tests for a similar setup with an earlier Rasbian OS & got speeds around 2-4 MB per second via the network!If you use Wifi instead it gets even slower. Most modern switches & routers will run at up to around 60MB/s with gigabit ethernet speeds, the Pi's 'fast' ethernet (not Gigabit) can only manage 4-6MB/s at best.I'm not sure anyone wants to transfer Terabytes of data via a link that runs at Megabytes per second, but it's OK for limited use.There are examples of Gigabit USB adaptors on Pi, but I don't think you will get around the USB2 speed limits with the Pi...

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    The Pi hardware uses USB for the built in ethernet port & the USB storage, USB2 speeds are shared between both devices.It means NAS solutions like this are limited by how quickly the Pi can route data over USB. I did tests for a similar setup with an earlier Rasbian OS & got speeds around 2-4 MB per second via the network!If you use Wifi instead it gets even slower. Most modern switches & routers will run at up to around 60MB/s with gigabit ethernet speeds, the Pi's 'fast' ethernet (not Gigabit) can only manage 4-6MB/s at best.I'm not sure anyone wants to transfer Terabytes of data via a link that runs at Megabytes per second, but it's OK for limited use.There are examples of Gigabit USB adaptors on Pi, but I don't think you will get around the USB2 speed limits with the Pi's hardware…http://www.jeffgeerling.com/blogs/jeff-geerling/getting-gigabit-networking

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