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  • procter commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Picture Frame With Bevels and Mitres1 month ago
    Picture Frame With Bevels and Mitres

    Please change the privacy settings on the videos as they are not showable here in NZ. Thanks.

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  • procter commented on deba168's instructable How to Make a Bench Power Supply1 month ago
    How to Make a Bench Power Supply

    I see you have added"Credit :This section is not written by me rather it is taken from electronics-lab.com.The full credit goes to the original author."That is excellent and acceptable.Unfortunately the fact that Banggood (may) have illegally used copyright material does not excuse you from doing the same. Banggod may also have got written permission to use it.When I read an instructable, I expect it to (mostly) be created by the writer. That includes schematics, photos, videos, etc. There would never be a complaint like this if you inserted a link to other material and said something like "See here for details on how to...". But if you did that, your article may be a little smaller... Or you only copied small pieces and put an acknowledgement caption under each pie...

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    I see you have added"Credit :This section is not written by me rather it is taken from electronics-lab.com.The full credit goes to the original author."That is excellent and acceptable.Unfortunately the fact that Banggood (may) have illegally used copyright material does not excuse you from doing the same. Banggod may also have got written permission to use it.When I read an instructable, I expect it to (mostly) be created by the writer. That includes schematics, photos, videos, etc. There would never be a complaint like this if you inserted a link to other material and said something like "See here for details on how to...". But if you did that, your article may be a little smaller... Or you only copied small pieces and put an acknowledgement caption under each piece. Bear in mind that someone else has invested a lot of time and money putting together that material.Keep up the good work, and I'll look forward to your next article.

    The portions that you have authored yourself are very good and I give you credit for them.BUT, this instructable is clearly made up of much material that has been copied from other websites AND you have NOT GIVEN SUFFICIENT CREDIT (that I can see) to the original authors who are the copyright holders!In my opinion this article should be temporarily withdrawn as it is plagiarism. When you have amended it and properly acknowledged EVERY copied paragraph, photograph and diagram, you might be ethically permitted to resubmit it, although copyright material, and whole sections copied, require explicit permission from copyright holders. Acknowledgement includes a caption for every item, something like "The above paragraph copied from...", or "The above image published with the p...

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    The portions that you have authored yourself are very good and I give you credit for them.BUT, this instructable is clearly made up of much material that has been copied from other websites AND you have NOT GIVEN SUFFICIENT CREDIT (that I can see) to the original authors who are the copyright holders!In my opinion this article should be temporarily withdrawn as it is plagiarism. When you have amended it and properly acknowledged EVERY copied paragraph, photograph and diagram, you might be ethically permitted to resubmit it, although copyright material, and whole sections copied, require explicit permission from copyright holders. Acknowledgement includes a caption for every item, something like "The above paragraph copied from...", or "The above image published with the permission of...".Examples:(1) Circuit Diagram: Under section "Step 7: How the Power Supply Kit Works", you have used a circuit diagram that is identical to, and presumably lifted from webpage [http://www.electronics-lab.com/project/0-30-vdc-stabilized-power-supply-with-current-control-0-002-3-a/] (Electronics Lab). That webpage has the words "Copyright of this circuit belongs to smart kit electronics" so you should not be using it! You have not given them credit in your article for the copyright diagram and there is no disclaimer saying "published with the permission of...".(2) Your third paragraph: "This is a high quality stabilised voltage supply..." is identical to the opening paragraph of Electronics Lab.(3) The text: Following the diagram (#2 above) you have cut and pasted the entire section of six paragraphs from Electronics Lab material.(4) The acknowledgement "credit : electronics-lab.com" is NOT SUFFICIENT. You may not copy entire sections of copyright work without permission. You may quote from it to a 'reasonable' extent, but not copy it and claim it as your own article.(5) You also seem to have lifted a lot of material, text and graphics, from [http://img.banggood.com/file/products/201505080459530-30Vinstall.pdf], or elsewhere. You have provided a link to them but have also cut/pasted lot of their material without acknowledgement/permission.(6) You also seem to have lifted a lot of material, text and graphics, from the kitset site [https://www.banggood.com/0-30V-2mA-3A-Adjustable-DC-Regulated-Power-Supply-DIY-Kit-p-958308.html], or elsewhere. You have provided a link to them but have also cut/pasted lot of their material without acknowledgement/permission.And there is a more...If you take the care to 'honestly' produce excellent Instructables, I will have no hesitation in giving you the credit - I look forward to that.

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  • procter commented on StephenCartwright's instructable Sleek Simple Chair2 months ago
    Sleek Simple Chair

    What an elegant chair! Superb lesson - a professional opinion :-), from the son of a cabinet maker plus one teacher to another.I am going to scale this to where my 8 month old grand-daughter will be in about a year's time.Thank you, and I encourage you to present more (and more, and more) of your work. I am very impressed and look forward to your next stunning project.

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  • procter commented on tomatoskins's instructable Wooden Dead Blow Mallet2 months ago
    Wooden Dead Blow Mallet

    Excellent Instructable, thanks.I think your making of lead shot in a bucket of water with a blow torch is so elegantly simple that I laughed - brilliant!My understanding of physics and Newton's second law, tells me that the principle of a 'Dead' blow is that it doesn't bounce (much), so delivers less force, more gradually, and so protects the surface of the target. This is absolutely pivotal if you are tapping something like a sheet of glass.Therefore, the greater the compression on the hammer-head at impact, the more gentle the blow on the target, while delivering exactly the same 'force'. (note: same force as another hammer that doesn't bounce, as opposed to one the rebounds)So my question (#1): Does the lead shot compress on impact?I think the answer is YES, but it will deform and no...

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    Excellent Instructable, thanks.I think your making of lead shot in a bucket of water with a blow torch is so elegantly simple that I laughed - brilliant!My understanding of physics and Newton's second law, tells me that the principle of a 'Dead' blow is that it doesn't bounce (much), so delivers less force, more gradually, and so protects the surface of the target. This is absolutely pivotal if you are tapping something like a sheet of glass.Therefore, the greater the compression on the hammer-head at impact, the more gentle the blow on the target, while delivering exactly the same 'force'. (note: same force as another hammer that doesn't bounce, as opposed to one the rebounds)So my question (#1): Does the lead shot compress on impact?I think the answer is YES, but it will deform and not resume its original shape, therefore will eventually need replacing to remain effective.Solid lead, enclosed, will not compress materially and therefore is of no benefit other than mass.So my question (#2): Will the face of the hammer compress sufficiently?I think you can tweak the surface material to suit your needs when you make the hammer.You could possibly use some Trump hide which is very thick and very elastic and can be thrown out when past its use-by date.

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  • procter commented on Techgenie's instructable Mosquito Killer Machine2 months ago
    Mosquito Killer Machine

    Sandflies, sigh...Here's a quote, not sure of its origin, but probably true:"One way to deter sandflies in NZ is to walk around carrying a penguin as bait, while eating garlic, covered in Dettol and baby oil."

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  • procter commented on Techgenie's instructable Mosquito Killer Machine2 months ago
    Mosquito Killer Machine

    Excellent observation skills!We are lucky here (NZ). Where I live you can count the mosquitoes that invade your house - less than one a day (vision of half a mosquito flying around :-).Good luck

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  • procter commented on Techgenie's instructable Mosquito Killer Machine2 months ago
    Mosquito Killer Machine

    Your instructable is well done.Unfortunately this is NOT at all effective at killing mosquitoes, so you should remove reference to mosquitoes. It is, however, very effective at killing other insects that are beneficial.See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bug_zapperQuote: "External trapsThese traps are not effective at killing biting insects (female mosquitoes and other insects), being much more effective at attracting and killing other harmless and beneficial insects.A study by the University of Delaware showed that over period of 15 summer nights 13,789 insects were killed among six devices.Of those insects killed, only 31 were biting insects. Mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide and water vapor in the breath of mammals, not ultraviolet light.However, there are now bug zappe...

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    Your instructable is well done.Unfortunately this is NOT at all effective at killing mosquitoes, so you should remove reference to mosquitoes. It is, however, very effective at killing other insects that are beneficial.See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bug_zapperQuote: "External trapsThese traps are not effective at killing biting insects (female mosquitoes and other insects), being much more effective at attracting and killing other harmless and beneficial insects.A study by the University of Delaware showed that over period of 15 summer nights 13,789 insects were killed among six devices.Of those insects killed, only 31 were biting insects. Mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide and water vapor in the breath of mammals, not ultraviolet light.However, there are now bug zappers that emit carbon dioxide or use an external bait, such as octenol, to better attract biting insects into the light."

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  • procter commented on bribillin's instructable Particle Detector2 months ago
    Particle Detector

    Just save them as ".jpg" NOT '.jpg-large" (it's that simple).Windows won't recognise ".jpg-large" as a JPEG image.

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  • procter commented on Widgetwizard's instructable 8 Planet Motorized Orrery - 3D Printed3 months ago
    8 Planet Motorized Orrery - 3D Printed

    This is a fantastic project!You have done such an amazing job from design through to delivery, with great detail and excellent engineering. I have voted for you on this and will wait patiently for your next stunner.I'm very glad you are on this planet.

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  • Easy Handmade Wooden Ribbon Box

    Great idea, thanks.Are you allowed to store plums in it or is it wholly bananas?

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  • procter commented on sheepypuu's instructable Realistic Minecraft Grass Blocks!5 months ago
    Realistic Minecraft Grass Blocks!

    I'm not sure which I enjoy more - your excellent instructable or your excellent screen personality. Both clever and charming. More please... and thanks.

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  • procter commented on RowanCant's instructable Cupboard with folding table and lights8 months ago
    Cupboard with folding table and lights

    Brilliant! Well done.I was going to ask the question: Why "Left for me, right for my wife"?Then I realised, women are always right :-)

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  • procter commented on danthemakerman's instructable Saw Blade Knife10 months ago
    Saw Blade Knife

    Hello DanTheMakerManI didn't see the points I am about to make in any of the comments, if they are there already apologies. The rest of your Instructable is excellent and the end product(s) looks great.I think you are doing the complete opposite to what is required, when you describe your heat-treating the steel.To prepare steel for working on, you "anneal" it (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annealing_(metallurgy)), which is a process of heating the steel to, say, white-hot and cooling it very slowly. This makes for soft steel, or "mild steel". When you have finished working on a steel blade you "harden/temper" it, which is a process of heating it to, say, white hot and "quenching" it to cool it very rapidly, usually by plunging it in cold wate...

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    Hello DanTheMakerManI didn't see the points I am about to make in any of the comments, if they are there already apologies. The rest of your Instructable is excellent and the end product(s) looks great.I think you are doing the complete opposite to what is required, when you describe your heat-treating the steel.To prepare steel for working on, you "anneal" it (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annealing_(metallurgy)), which is a process of heating the steel to, say, white-hot and cooling it very slowly. This makes for soft steel, or "mild steel". When you have finished working on a steel blade you "harden/temper" it, which is a process of heating it to, say, white hot and "quenching" it to cool it very rapidly, usually by plunging it in cold water.Each part of the process changes the crystalline structure of the steel. "Tempering" (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempering_(metallurgy)) makes the steel fairly brittle and hard which is what is required for a good edge on a knife or sword. "Annealing" makes the steel soft so that you can file it. Files themselves are also made from "tempered" steel, which has a high carbon content (an impurity) which also means the tempered steel rusts very quickly. What we called "tempering" wikipedia calls "hardening" and describes tempering as a process that follows hardening, leaving the steel less brittle. I'd follow the Wikipedia process now, but we didn't as kids and made stunningly successful knives and short-swords out of files.To "anneal" the steel, you cool it slowly, slower than it will cool in air. This is often done by submerging the white-hot steel in lime powder and leaving it for a long time until you can handle it. Dry sand might do the trick. The slower the cooling, the softer the steel, which is exactly what you want when filing, cutting and hammering the steel.You actually tempered the steel before working on it, or at least tried to. The fact that you cut the saw blade with a hacksaw before annealing it, tends to make me believe, as per one comment, that you are not working with high-carbon steel when using a circular saw blade, even though the teeth most certainly are. Hardened high-carbon steel is quite brittle and would be dangerous on a circular saw as it may fragment/shatter (this is my guess anyway).The best way I have used, as I learnt as a 12-year-old, is to make a knife out of a file. Anneal the file - it becomes very soft and you can grind it, file it, hammer it and shape it. Then harden/temper the steel and you have a knife of the brittleness/hardness of the original file. Then hone it on a stone. Old files are cheap and readily available.Good luck

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  • Practical Guide to LEDs 2 - Essential Circuits

    Your are in the process of creating a very valuable resource.Writing style; careful explanations; examples - they excellent and all work for me.Thank you, congratulations, and don't stop any time soon :-)

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  • procter commented on jgrachie's instructable Build a Raised Garden Wicking Bed1 year ago
    Build a Raised Garden Wicking Bed

    Great instructable, thanks.Comment on "eliminate bending over (50th birthday coming soon)":You are 'probably' in the process of throwing away a few years of your life and 'definitely' throwing away future mobility. Even if you have an injury, this still holds true. If you don't use it, you lose it, and 50 is a pathetically young age to be even contemplating this retrograde step. Say bye-bye to playing with your grandchildren.

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  • DIY Powerful LED Panel - Video and Work Light

    Regarding Lumens, etc, and estimating - download a light meter app to your smartphone.

    Great lesson, thanks. I will be giving this a go for sure.Small educational matter: (12.0 - 9.9 <> 3.1) and (12.0 - 9.9 = 2.1).I'm not sure yet what effect this would have on your project :-)

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