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  • rhkramer commented on ecrouch's instructable PVC Rain Gutter Cleaner7 months ago
    PVC Rain Gutter Cleaner

    I am not the OP, but I'll respond anyway--I would say, yes, you could get water up "into" the roof (or, I would say, somewhat under the shingles), but I don't see that as a major problem (unless your water pressure is so high as to be able to damage the shingles). Some of my reasoning: * Most modern shingle roofs (in our area) have at least a 30 to 36" wide layer of a product named something like Weatherguard (or equal) under the bottom row of shingles. This is sort of like an upgraded tar paper, usually made of rubber and with a (iiuc, heat activated) adhesive on the bottom. It is intended to avoid leaks due to ice dams (which, in general, cause water to lay on the roof and possibly back up under the shingles). I don't remember exactly, but when I replaced my roof ...see more »I am not the OP, but I'll respond anyway--I would say, yes, you could get water up "into" the roof (or, I would say, somewhat under the shingles), but I don't see that as a major problem (unless your water pressure is so high as to be able to damage the shingles). Some of my reasoning: * Most modern shingle roofs (in our area) have at least a 30 to 36" wide layer of a product named something like Weatherguard (or equal) under the bottom row of shingles. This is sort of like an upgraded tar paper, usually made of rubber and with a (iiuc, heat activated) adhesive on the bottom. It is intended to avoid leaks due to ice dams (which, in general, cause water to lay on the roof and possibly back up under the shingles). I don't remember exactly, but when I replaced my roof (myself ;-) I put two or three strips (widthwise) of this material under my shingles, so even if ice dams backed the water up 5 feet or more, I shouldn't have any leaks. (Also, in an area of my lower roof, where the gutters from my upper roof dump water on the lower roof (a bad design, but I haven't rearranged the gutters yet), I have Weatherguard under those shingles. * I would do any gutter flushing either on a sunny day or knowing that we would still have sunny warm days, so, even if I didn't have material like that on the roof, the (minimal) water that might get under the shingles would dry out over the next few days.

    I hope this is not a duplicate--I made this comment earlier, but it hasn't shown up yet--are these comments moderated?I am not the OP, but I'll respond anyway--I would say, yes, you could get water up "into" the roof (or, I would say, somewhat under the shingles), but I don't see that as a major problem (unless your water pressure is so high as to be able to damage the shingles). Some of my reasoning: * Most modern shingle roofs (in our area) have at least a 30 to 36" wide layer of a product named something like Weatherguard (or equal) under the bottom row of shingles. This is sort of like an upgraded tar paper, usually made of rubber and with an adhesive (iiuc, heat activated) on the bottom. It is intended to avoid leaks due to ice dams (which, in general, cause wat...see more »I hope this is not a duplicate--I made this comment earlier, but it hasn't shown up yet--are these comments moderated?I am not the OP, but I'll respond anyway--I would say, yes, you could get water up "into" the roof (or, I would say, somewhat under the shingles), but I don't see that as a major problem (unless your water pressure is so high as to be able to damage the shingles). Some of my reasoning: * Most modern shingle roofs (in our area) have at least a 30 to 36" wide layer of a product named something like Weatherguard (or equal) under the bottom row of shingles. This is sort of like an upgraded tar paper, usually made of rubber and with an adhesive (iiuc, heat activated) on the bottom. It is intended to avoid leaks due to ice dams (which, in general, cause water to lay on the roof and possibly back up under the shingles). I don't remember exactly, but when I replaced my roof (myself ;-) I put two or three strips (widthwise) of this material under my shingles, so even if ice dams backed the water up 5 feet or more, I shouldn't have any leaks. (Also, in an area of my lower roof, where the gutters from my upper roof dump water on the lower roof (a bad design, but I haven't rearranged the gutters yet), I have Weatherguard under those shingles.) * I would do any gutter flushing either on a sunny day or knowing that we would still have sunny warm days, so, even if I didn't have material like that on the roof, the (minimal) water that might get under the shingles would dry out over the next few days.

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