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  • Poor Man's Google Glass/Aid for Those With Tunnel Vision

    Excellent job. I believe you should patent and market this. Definitely worth visiting a patent attorney and getting his opinion as to potential. My father is 97 and has macular degeneration. He and many others in our aging population could afford to pay well for this device. Keep thinking small, recall Sony's initial claim to fame. . . Look into the Macintosh technologies for the camera on the MacBook Air and the iPhone as examples for your goals. The new iPhone X is an amazing device; its technology could inspire your design even more. This project alone and its origins in helping your grandmother are your ticket to being an engineer or running your own company. I am sure your parents and especially grandmother are extremely proud of you! Best of luck.

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  • schreib commented on tanner_tech's instructable DIY Induction Heater1 month ago
    DIY Induction Heater

    What an amazing kid. What. . . ? 14, 16 years old? I am glad I chose mechanical engineering instead of electrical engineering half a century ago . . . I could never have competed against the sparky's-- who have since saved my bacon many a time. Tanner is a perfect example of the cool determination and confidence of top-end electrical engineers. I especially love the part showing the trial and error learning and solutions. Excellent video presentation. and yes, this could be used for knife blades but likely requires longer / bigger coil and other components to handle the amp draw.

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  • schreib followed makjosher8 months ago
      • Rocket Boat
      • Simple Sheet Metal Brake: No Welding
      • Outdoor Workbench With Internal Wood Storage
  • schreib commented on makjosher's instructable The Ski Sled8 months ago
    The Ski Sled

    Fantastic Job. other comments ably do justice lauding you for your stature as a designer and presenter. Something new possibly: -- keep in mind you gotta stop, especially when going fast towards an oak tree! Suggest a knife type drag keel actuated down into the snow at heels of runners. plus wear a helmet!-- It has been years since I downhill skied but as I recall to make a turn . . . it is a process by which one lifts up the entire body a tiny amount to allow pivoting both skiis just above the snow to re-orient them to a new angle. Doing so will be very hard with a platform under your torso where you have no ability to use your body to significantly create a downward force. You can't take the weight off the sled like you can by flexing your legs or hopping a bit with normal skiis...

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    Fantastic Job. other comments ably do justice lauding you for your stature as a designer and presenter. Something new possibly: -- keep in mind you gotta stop, especially when going fast towards an oak tree! Suggest a knife type drag keel actuated down into the snow at heels of runners. plus wear a helmet!-- It has been years since I downhill skied but as I recall to make a turn . . . it is a process by which one lifts up the entire body a tiny amount to allow pivoting both skiis just above the snow to re-orient them to a new angle. Doing so will be very hard with a platform under your torso where you have no ability to use your body to significantly create a downward force. You can't take the weight off the sled like you can by flexing your legs or hopping a bit with normal skiis. However, What comes to mind is a way to momentarily press some object down into the snow while a mechanism allows a central pivoting action. It would require very quick action and very minor angle adjustment in order to prevent excessive drag and loss of control.-- an alternative to this is reconsider the entire flat runner idea. It started out good through your Dad's initial design and your latest work but to advance you may have to AGAIN think out of the box. What comes to mind is going back to flexible runners but with wider bases(ski like) and made of carbon fiber or some composite. Remember, money is no object here! You may even consider going to your local university's mechanical engineering dept and ask them for free consulting assistance. Offering them an opportunity to turn this into an undergrad design class project etc. -- It would be nice to know what you think of Sketchup vs traditional CAD. I still use an OLD version of Vectorworks on my OLD MacBook. Been looking for replacement for years that is less than $1000.

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  • Measure The Moisture Content Of Your Firewood With A Multimeter

    nice idea but like JmsDwh's concerns, the process of driving nails into the wood to 20 or 25% of depth makes me wonder about the reliability of commercial meters with their inability and non-use of this process to get "good" readings. It seems that a simple comparison with a well known moisture meter would be a great adjunct experiment to publish!

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