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  • Amazing, Cheap & Easy, Cracked Gems & Marbles. for Fantasy & Crafts.

    I did this back in the late 60's/early 70's, with my grandmother. We just heated them in the oven, then poured the cookie sheet full of them into the sink, filled with cold water. No muss, no fuss, and never a thought about safety glasses. I remember a very few crumbling -- very few. We glued them together, making small poodle dogs using around nine per dog figure, with felt lips/ears/tails (red/brown or black). They sat on shelves as decorations for around 15 years. A very few cracked, and fell apart, but usually that only happened when we dropped them.The idea of using them as gem props, for D&D games is great. I can think of a number of uses for these. I never thought about using the flattened glass beads my sons used in their Mage Knight/Pokemon games... They really are...

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    I did this back in the late 60's/early 70's, with my grandmother. We just heated them in the oven, then poured the cookie sheet full of them into the sink, filled with cold water. No muss, no fuss, and never a thought about safety glasses. I remember a very few crumbling -- very few. We glued them together, making small poodle dogs using around nine per dog figure, with felt lips/ears/tails (red/brown or black). They sat on shelves as decorations for around 15 years. A very few cracked, and fell apart, but usually that only happened when we dropped them.The idea of using them as gem props, for D&D games is great. I can think of a number of uses for these. I never thought about using the flattened glass beads my sons used in their Mage Knight/Pokemon games... They really are quite nice looking. Could possibly be used as eyes for paper mache' dragons, as well. Love the faux jewelry examples, also. Cheers!

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  • Printed Wooden Panels for Your Home (or how to decorate your house like a nerd)

    Technically, this is feasible; realistically, I would not try it. I worked as a laser printer repair technician for numerous years. The toner (plastic beads, very, very small, and lightweight) are transferred to the paper sheet by electrostatic charge, and if you blow on the sheet, they will smear, at the least. The only way to get the paper before it has the toner melted onto the page, is to stop the printer before the paper enters the Fuser Assembly -- you won't get the full image on the page, as it enters the Fuser Assembly before the page has been fully imaged. By pulling the paper through the Feed Assembly, manually, you could damage the printer, leading to expensive repairs. The technique discussed here, is easier, and will produce better results. Cheers!

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