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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    as to your points :#1 yes it will hold for a few years. over 20 or 30+ years its another story. if the instrument is subject to a lot of change in humidity, that puts a lot more stress into the joint. the joint may not fail out right, but it will move. In a laminated neck with the mix of grain directions is the most difficult situation because of mixed expansion / contraction rates. I can show you wood that has expanded and moved against the glue. still perfectly stuck on, but now 1/16th out of alignment due to moisture expansion. I have some purple heart that is especially prone to movement, 1/8th over 9" on a peice. its why wood aka PVA glues are not rated for structural applications, the allow the wood to move. For example : https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/cutting-b.....

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    as to your points :#1 yes it will hold for a few years. over 20 or 30+ years its another story. if the instrument is subject to a lot of change in humidity, that puts a lot more stress into the joint. the joint may not fail out right, but it will move. In a laminated neck with the mix of grain directions is the most difficult situation because of mixed expansion / contraction rates. I can show you wood that has expanded and moved against the glue. still perfectly stuck on, but now 1/16th out of alignment due to moisture expansion. I have some purple heart that is especially prone to movement, 1/8th over 9" on a peice. its why wood aka PVA glues are not rated for structural applications, the allow the wood to move. For example : https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/cutting-b... or just read the label on the bottle....#2 there are cold hide glues such as one sold by Titebond and others : https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006NNJY0/ref=asc_df_B...#3 penetration of the surface doesn't matter the way you think. its about establishing a bond on the relative surface which matters. less than 1/100th of an inch, far closer to atoms of thickness. that said, PVA glues can work any where from very well to very poorly depending on the wood. woods with a lot of natural oils may require being wiped with acetone before bonding, or really a different glue should be used. epoxy OTH will not move and produce a rigid joint. its used to build aircraft. in will transmit vibration better which is generally a good thing in instruments, especially in a neck repair. its water proof. it works with oily woods. it can be thinned and applied with a needle into a crack that doesn't go all all the way thru. in fact, if you are really concerned about surface penetration, a little thinning will increase for that, buts its never really been an issue. given that wood has natural absorbing properties, any penetration past the surface I'd expect to be similar, at least if using a 60 min epoxy. epoxy will produce a "stronger than wood" bond. epoxy also doesn't require clamping pressure for a strong joint. as long as the pieces are in place, you are good. PVA glues require strong clamping for a strong joint, which if you don't get right will cause outright joint failure.temps are another factor. PVA's don't cure correctly under 55 F and produce a weak joint which will fail. Epoxy will set setup, just slower. if folks with unheated work areas, a factor to consider.down the road, epoxy can be dissolved with acetone. never tried it, never needed to.epoxy clean up of any overflow is not a big deal. scrape down, sand smooth with 400, 600, maybe 1200. then polish with 2-3 coarse to fine polishes. this might take 10-15 minutes or so depending on how much initial overflow there is to remove. might as well polish the rest of the guitar up at the same time back to new shine.

    maybe, but I don't have any broken headstocks to glue up right now. OTH I can show you a repair done 30 years ago thats just as good as the day it was done. I'm also not going to give up my personal repair method(s) which goe beyond just a simple glue up. having had to fix other peoples "repairs" the rest of this had me cringing like the filler stick and shoe polish. Getting the headstock top to shine is just a matter of removing the tuners, polishing with proper compounds, putting the tuners back on. Instead of getting upset at me, perhaps learning more would be better especially if you want to publish content like this. once upon a time I didn't know these things but I spent the time to become educated about them. still learning new things.

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    wood or white glue is the WRONG glue. period. wood glue is a slight variation on white glue. NEITHER is rated for STRUCTURAL use. Thats something thats hold a load. over time ALL wood glues will move. its. how it is. Instead there are two options. The proper glue is a hide glue. Its what good guitars are glued with when made. The nice thing is that with heat, you can take the joint part. That would of been handy in a dual break situation. The other option is epoxy. While some lutherer types might not like epoxy because its quite permenet, it will hold. In fact it will hold when any oily woods may be involved - dark exotics. My other trade secret to fixing headstocks so they _wont_ break again I'm not saying. hard earned and not for free.

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  • Retro-Mod - Bluetooth Speaker Madness

    or cheat some LED's in, a LOT less power consumption. those tubes are probably still good and worth $$. I agree, if the electronics in it were already gutted, then the conversion made sense. however, restoring it to working order wouldn't of been hard... and you could of had some working living history. you could of hid a bluetooth audio board in the top, and wired in an A/B switch to go from original tube radio to BT receiver. that would of kept it alive, added some new functionality... and would be a nice space heater in winter ;)

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  • steve.oakley.10 commented on djpolymath's instructable Corner Clamp Jig2 years ago
    Corner Clamp Jig

    Don't use white / wood glue. use urethane (aka gorilla glue ) or epoxy , then no pressure on the joint is required, just keep the pieces in place until it sets. :)

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